old school

Members
  • Content count

    6,222
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About old school

  • Rank
    Hero Member
  • Birthday 04/08/1952

Profile Information

  • Location
    So Cal
  • Interests
    Recording Music, Disc Golf, Body Surfing, Gardening, People
  • Interested in Sound for Picture
    Yes
  • About
    4th generation Californian.. Proud father of 2 sons, Married for 35 years and counting. USC Film School grad. 33 years in local 695

Recent Profile Visitors

4,295 profile views
  1. I'll check it out Mike. I saw "The Hero" today. A small American film. Well made IMO. I hope you are well. CrewC
  2. That's the truth IMO. Think about films like "Ordinary People", "Last Detail", "Wait Until Dark", "Last Picture Show" etc.... Story was paramount, even above star power. They all had strong directors, single producers, good writers, maybe a literary heritage, quality actors (not stars per se) and a realistic shooting and post schedule. Not how they're made today. I agree w Mike West as well about the UK films and what we call TV. Best place to find well made story driven content. CrewC
  3. Happy Dad Day to all you Dads. Personally speaking, it's the thing I'm most grateful for the honor of being. CrewC
  4. As a music recording hobbiest, I really enjoyed this post/video. Gear, with all its pluses, minuses, limitations, characteristics, etc all play a big part of a songs sound, but the biggest, most important element is the performance when done 50's style live in a room with players making the magic. Thanks for this find mono. CrewC
  5. As always, great job Richard and all who contributed to this and every issue. Thanks. CrewC
  6. Excellent advice. That is the POV that the best sound people I've worked with all shared. CrewC
  7. This has the Ansel Adams in NM look... CrewC
  8. The world is definitely a louder place than even 10 years VAS. But I'd like to add a little history to your comment about Jim Webb. I did 4 or 5 films w Jim and I can absolutely tell you he hated multitrack and thought it was the wrong way to make film. He made many great points about that work flow when we talked about it because I pumped him for info many times because I liked Altman Films. He really didn't like being associated with multitrack but was proud that he and his team pulled it off with Altman, but left that camp after "A Wedding". He never looked back. I'd like to add that I think Altman was an artist who knew the craft well, so well he could push the "rules". He made many films his way, and while I liked a lot of them, some were..... For the record, I love the tools we have today. Coupled with a good director and story worth telling, many do great work and there is hope some will carry on. Jeff and Don and I had the fleeting good fortune to do some good work. He and Don continued to do it well and fight the good fight to do it right, but sadly, that is not an option all that often these days. Almost all of what we considered "good sound" is not wanted or recognized as such. It'd be interesting to see "An Officer and a Gentelman" mixed and posted in today's workflow world. I have a good idea what that would sound like. Not as good.;~) Sharman's OP is a good starter for the state of sound for picture. I, like Phillip and others don't want to come off as cranky old farts bemoaning the new kids and what not, it really isn't that. I feel the product made these days is more rollercoaster ride than stories I have love since I was a 5 year old watching movies at the Fox Fullerton Theater full of kids, teen, and adults. I do see/hear good work in some of the small and independent films and that keeps my hopes alive. CrewC
  9. Since this is such a wide open and subjective topic, I doubt we can find an answer in that one size never fits all. I will throw this out though, "Time". Back in the day as they say, there was time to do things right. 60 day shooting schedules were the norm. One camera was the norm as was interdepartmental cooperation that was expected and a part of every set up and shot to complete a film. On top of that, actors who used the tools of the craft, their voices. Directors were seldom "first time" and usually he usually had one producer guiding the "story" they set out to make together. Add to that a reasonable post production schedule that allowed the director and producer to find the film they set out to make. And technically the dialog was one track and only the on camera actor recorded per shot. Re recording was not 196 tracks of ProTool files jammed and compressed into an over loud listening experience mixed with an unrealistic schedule where finesse is not an option. Not that we are ever going back, but something has been lost IMO. CrewC
  10. FWIW, I saw and played a bit w the Mix3 & 6 today. Very cool units. I like what they do for different purposes in our world. My only issue is powering. Seems limited. Tempted to buy. Definitely want to try it as a ProTools interface too. Thanks to all who posted the good info. CrewC
  11. I like your videos Dave. Are you going to make one about the MixPre as a USB interface for ProTool? CrewC
  12. Like a licensing fee? Seems like a good way to open a revenue stream for Zax, but from all I've seen over the years I doubt it's about the money with them. Just my 2 cents. FWIW, lawyers get rich, not small companies in this type of thing. CrewC
  13. I'm glad you A students are as dumbfounded as I am... CrewC
  14. Being a C student I have trouble seeing the infringement of the PDR to the Zax recording transmitter. Seems to me a stand alone recorder is just that and a integrated recorder in a wireless transmitter is something else. Seems like a reach, but again, I'm a C student at best. CrewC
  15. Never gets easier when one of our musical heros die. I never met him or his band mates, but I got very close to them via their gift of music. I hope he passed peacefully, high on the love we shared through the music they brought to us. Jam on brother. CrewC