Dutch

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Everything posted by Dutch

  1. Not sure where your seeming angst is coming from Crew, but it's not rooted with me. I capitalized your screen name because they taught me in school to always capitalize names and it's no sign of disrespect. I disagree with your statement as it's a mix of quality gear and knowing how to get the most from it that produces professional results. I've been reading this forum since 2011 and joined within the last few years. I have a dozen IMDB credits since the last film on your list and over 3000 hours of feature film and reality TV work in that time period.
  2. Thanks Jim, it's been a long tough winter and I realize everyone is facing personal/professional challenges. Just hours ago my girlfriend dumped me because she sees no future in what I enjoy doing (film production/sound). It's been one of those weeks! Lol This is a pretty awesome group of people here and I'm very thankful of all the positive member contributions. Wish I had enough spare $$$ to make the trip out to NAB and meet some of these people in person.
  3. I will take that to heart Old School. But frankly I wish you'd share some of how you deal with recording challenges. I wouldn't take that as self congratulating or blowing smoke. Don't you ever say that I threw shade on John because that's bullshit and not true. I spoke to John as a peer who ripped on another peer. Surely Robert doesn't need my defense but I've appreciated the viewpoints he shares and I agree with 99% of what he shares so I did. Obviously there are biases here that I'm unaware of.
  4. John, since your comment was about what I wrote, please vent your thoughts to me. I'd love to get a 688 eventually and what you said may have some validity. But my role in the area I service is certainly not to compete against the people who taught me how to be a professional. My 633 fills a niche and does it well. Right now my niche is not as a department head for feature films. For those I enjoy supporting my friends careers as a boom op or assistant. So John as good as you may be as a sound mixer, it's really not cool to throw stones. Not many of us are in the same league as some of the masters on this board. In my opinion it takes not only skills, a willingness to listen, but also genuine humility to get to their level. Peace out bro!
  5. Thanks RP, you summarized it well! I concur as we're hired and paid well to get clean recordings in challenging situations. White hot, artifact free, and impactful recordings that support the 4-8k high def visuals being recorded. As an example I recently did a roundtable shoot with women who had lost a child. I knew it would be emotional so I ran my boom and 4th lav through my 302 into the 633 line inputs. Also chose to put the African American woman through that lav as she had the most powerful range in her voice. Was a good move too as she went from super quiet whisper to thunderous vocal projections. Those 302 limiters saved that part of the scene until I could ease the faders down. The director was worried we lost the audio as she was deafening but to her surprise on playback it was excellent, even at clipping. My mentors never taught me that stuff but they did teach me how to plan, to think, and set the standard that I strive to maintain as a professional. Being a good soundman is much more than being technically proficient and really is a background art form unto itself.
  6. Sure hope guys like Old School and you only semi-retire. I'd split my wages anytime just to have you on set and soak up some of your wisdom. Thanks for breaking the trails and building the bridges!
  7. Not sure what was funnier, Dan's rant or the picture of a zoom with a cedar! Nah, Dan wins!
  8. Thanks Glen, as I typically work in small market areas it's important to invest in gear carefully. Looking forward to the early summer specials and word back about the latest and greatest from the NAB show.
  9. I have a lot invested in Lectro's but really like the new Zax wireless after working with a peer who swears by them. Just been waiting on the FCC auction which just ended and saving a few more $$$ before taking the plunge.
  10. Of course you always leave headroom, that's elementary! I love the size of my 633 but realize that there's always a trade-off between size and function. Surely it would be the size of a 688 if it had six analog in's. Chris's comment about it not being a professional unit because of this trade-off was quite untrue as exampled by the many great sound recordists using this gear. When working on unscripted projects you quickly learn the benefit of hardware limiters which has nothing to do with proper gain and headroom settings.
  11. One of the great films has to be "Microcosmos". Philippe Barbeau and Bernard Leroux did an incredible job on sound. The film took 3 years to make and is still probably the most ambitious film of its type to this day. Have you ever heard an ants footsteps? Watch this film! It's a marvel from both visual and sound perspectives. Short clips: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=76R2EKEnoJQ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HfUf5IawJ30 http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0117040/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microcosmos_(film)
  12. Not sure what you mean by more professional unit as they all have their drawbacks Chris. I just run the inputs through my 302 and into 5 and 6 when using my 633 when additional analog are needed. I'd put my recording results using SD equipment against anything on the market in a field comparison. Not knocking other equipment either as it's all give and take.
  13. Works great, especially with the heavy duty Canare 4 wire. Not needed for under 50ft but for my boom op 2-way and 100ft long it really saves time.
  14. +1 Dan Izen, I'd fight alongside you in the trenches any day brother! So true, everything Dan stated, so sadly true!
  15. I'd keep your 302 as it's a very versatile piece of gear. There's something special about those limiters too! Maybe someone here can explain why they seem to work better than the ones on the 633? I've used the 302 and 633 combo for many interesting applications (ex: pzm's + shotgun's) with good results. The 302 also provides an extra 3 channels of phantom power when needed without having to commit to the larger footprint of the 664 or 688. Not to mention that you're covering your butt by having two mixers if you also have a simple recorder such as the DR-40 which is what I use for emergency. You can get creative too in follow car or other challenging applications by having two mixers/recorders.
  16. It's guys like yourself and Don that I'd love to learn from as we share a similar passion for the art form of film making. Keep me in mind if you ever need a second boom or if Don isn't available, it would be an honor to work with people of your caliber!
  17. "King", well said ramallo! My mother in-law told me a story about seeing Chuck Berry at a small venue concert and only about 20-30 people showed up. He wasn't upset though and had everyone come up and get close around him in a semi-circle. All smiles and full of his patented vigor he rocked the place for a full show. Only now, looking back can we see that those special people (Chuck Berry, and Elvis), The King's of Rock-n-Roll started a renaissance in music lasting 25 years that may never again be duplicated in any era of time. No other art form touches our emotions and communicates to the masses as music does, to be King of that renaissance is quite the lifetime achievement. Chuck Berry may have passed away but he will always be with us!
  18. Easy to see that Don commands respect on set and is an asset to the sound mixer and the production in general. My biggest pet peeve with the young film crew professionals is they don't care about the production, only their little bubble.
  19. That's some great advice Johnpaul215. Many of those old films I'm still in awe of and if I had a time machine I'd love to see how it was accomplished with the people/tech of those times.
  20. Sorry for not accepting your viewpoint and using the word ridiculous in my last post. I just see the sound department as such an important entity in the media creation process. You're probably right that the days of 4 or 5 mixers making $600 a day are history. But I do know that great PA's deserve a decent wage as they're like gold on a set. Technology can never replace a sound person who cares about the production and the quality of sound in the end product. We are the ears of the set and know things that nobody else does. We have the opportunity, if we choose, to make many things better on set with the things we hear. We hear the uptight crew members and can help smooth things over before they come to a boil. We hear the stress of the talent when a Director gets frustrated and barks at them. On boom I often use compassion or an encouraging word at these times and it seems to help keep them focused on their delivery. We have the power to fix things before they become real issues and I see that as part of my role too. These comments are only to emphasize that technology cannot replace the often unseen benefits we can bring to any production.
  21. I agree with AFMY as well but it's way more than just gear or even technical expertise. Nearly every gig I'm on I hear the same thing, "You're much nicer than the other sound guys we've worked with." I see it on this board too with certain members. Wish people a happy holiday and get no response, but say something negative about someones favorite piece of gear and you'll get plenty of grumpy replies. The attitudes often diminish your expertise and having a positive attitude during 60 hour work weeks goes a long way. So lighten up a little. One thing I learned from booming is you get way better results by being nice to cast and crew than by arguing. Great sound comes equally from working well with others as the gear itself. Machines or software can't replace the personal touch and human elements. To say that the Dugan addition to the 633 will lead to "Sound PA's" is ridiculous. Though it does help former boom op's like me do a better mix and advance my career as a department head. Thanks SD!
  22. SD rocks! Can't wait to try it out and hear other mixer's experiences with the software. Did a round table discussion recording over the weekend and wished I had the Dugan feature as it was challenging without. Thank you SD!
  23. Thanks Constantin, and FYI, I truly value your input on this forum as you're always willing to share your wisdom and help guys like me who eat a lot of macaroni and cheese for dinner (American poor mans food). Your boom op sounds amazing and I strive for that level anytime I'm in that role. The reason I'm adamant about using headphones is because they're also my eyes so to speak. The pristine part of the cone on a 416 booming at 32"-36" from chest level is less than a foot wide. Often with indies there is no rehearsal, camera is on an ez-rig, and my eyes are watching the DP, talent, and potential obstacles in my foot path. My ears guide my hands as much as my eyes do. Surely it's a bit easier when using a CMIT-5U but I won't risk that mic in inclement weather/high humidity situations. In this region some of my peers will work indie's for $400 a day with gear so you can imagine why there's some stress in some of my postings as I don't like to be a dog chasing scraps of meat. We only get a couple of union gigs a year in upstate and our tax credits haven't materialized into much as in other areas of the country so joining that fraternity isn't in the affordability cards right now. But I love this line of work, it's a passion, and I revere those who laid the bricks before me (god bless you Mr. Wexler/many others here and that's respect not ass kissing). Probably would've bailed a few years ago and will spare you the horror stories but a few of those films did really well (over a million paid views as well as theatrical releases) with kudos from DP's, Producers, Directors, and internationally known talent. Still just a journeyman at this craft though and really do appreciate what it's taken for many on here to master it. I owe quite a few beers to some of the major contributors on this forum as you've saved my butt on many occasions by sharing your expertise. Oh and yes I've had a few tonight so pardon the heartfelt response if it seems un-engineer like. Lol Thank you!
  24. Christian, I respect both you and Constantin but to make comments like that really works against the level of quality that hopefully we're all trying to achieve. Surely each genre has its own level of production quality. Theatrical released feature films are supposed to be the pinnacle of this profession. It's great that technology gives more and more aspiring artists a chance to express themselves. But the author said " My films are micro budget (the last one possibly the lowest budget film to ever get a theater release)." That's great, wow, maybe even impressive as it implies a level of quality people were willing to invest in to pay for a theatrical release. There are many great "indie" films that never get that opportunity. Since I make a living primarily in that genre, I see the disturbing trends of Producers who cut corners thinking that technology can take the place of experienced technicians. I've watched the trend of professional boom operators being replaced with "noodle armed" free labor from local film schools so they can add another "named actor" for a three line cameo. That tactic is just for the purpose of enhancing marketing but does little for the overall film. Sorry for the seeming rant as my intention isn't disrespect to anyone. My intention is respect! Respect for each individual crew position that it takes to make a quality film. Technology can't replace skilled people in this industry. So go back and read what Brian W wrote as it's all great advice! I'd gladly work with Brian knowing he works toward standards of excellence and he'd value my skills working toward that same goal.
  25. +1 for Brian W, anything less than his recommendations is ridiculous. Much like asking an experienced dolly operator to do his job without a monitor. Sure it can be done but come on be real! Speaking of dolly techs, anyone know how crazy Omar from L.A. is doing?