RPSharman

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About RPSharman

  • Rank
    Hero Member
  • Birthday 04/02/1969

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  • Location
    Thornbury - UK
  • About
    Production Sound Mixer - primarily features and TV.
  1. Green laser sounds cool. Or a starter pistol.
  2. I have had three 50s for a long time, and many colleagues have used them for many years. I use mine in all kids of environments, indoors and out. I've never heard of one stopping working. I got a weird noise on one of mine recently (it was over 15 years old) and sent it in. They replaced some bits, and now works as new.
  3. It really depends on where you are in LA. I have been using 22 and 25 Lectros here, and there's ample room in the blocks. There are also plenty of resources here where you can get extra wireless in a matter of minutes in case you run into any trouble. I wouldn't worry about it.
  4. Oh! There's a video assist forum on Yahoo Groups. You'd be better off asking people who do that work. My experiece these days is that there's some sort of camera utility or data wrangler (who often likes to call himself a DIT). They set up monitors for DP. Video assist then taps off that. What you show up with as a package is between you and the UPM. They get what they pay for.
  5. I'm confused. On a union job there's a video person. In LA they're 695, so technically part of "our" department. This is not the case anywhere else in the world. I thought the OP was saying that on low budget films they want to assign the task of video assist to a person in the sound department. Not hiring additional staff, but expecting what is likely a 2-person department to handle the task. Considering the modern demands on both sound and video departments, these jobs should very much be separate.
  6. Prepare the can of worms for opening... Video Assist is a union position on union films. It's its own job. A non-union film has no business using video assist. But if they must, I'd steer as far away from that responsibility as possible, and leave it to the camera department. On "low tier" films, you'll have a tough enough time doing your own job. They can rent a Pix that'll auto roll and cut with SDI feed from a pro camera. You can run XLR to Pix, or charge for wireless hop. If you're already running sound to camera for some reason, they can play off the camera. SDI feed will send audio too (I think).
  7. There should be a bottom shelf so muck on the ground or wet grass doesn't get on the bottom drawer.
  8. Awesome.
  9. I did Mumblecore pioneers Duplass Brothers' third film. They made it clear in the interview that everyone gets wired if they're in a scene. Scripted or not. Booms will be kicked out of the room in favor of three cameras, if there's not enough room. They were clear that audiences simply don't notice or care about dialog if the story is "real". It didn't go down that way on the day, and we got pretty good sound, but I had to negotiate a few things to preserve the performance over a camera angle they wouldn't use. It was a constant struggle to convince them they'd want a piece of critical dialog, as they truly believed they had reinvented the wheel. Not sure any of their films have made money. But the kids in this video probably saw the films and thought they were awesome.
  10. There are soundboard apps for iPads as well as laptops. "Soundboard" by Ambrisia is what I downloaded recently. You can assign each off line to a row of keys. It's pretty easy. I edit the clips in Audacity (free) and drag them into soundboard.
  11. I have shipped my small (96wH) via commercial airline through a freight company - UK to US. I have 3 in the bag. I attach one to my 664 via cable and have 2 spares taped. Not sure the carry-on rule applies, but why not do it anyway. My ipowers are all in devices too, with one spare each. They are all in one pelican with a clear label. My cart battery is SLA. I have large LiPO in the UK. I don't ship it. I am about to ship back to the UK. Dynamic in the UK and PackAir in LA seem to have shipping movie gear down. They had no issues whatsoever. I think the sensible thing is to have battery resources at your location. My cart power supply of choice does not hold LiPO, for this very reason.
  12. If they're inviting you on a tech scout, they're expecting to pay a full day rate. No gear. I have had some low budget shows not want to take me on scouts to save money. If I am available, and want to use the opportunity to meet the players before day one, then I'll see it as time well spent. But I might self drive and come and go as I please. If there's other work to be had, and they aren't paying, then I don't go. I think there's great value in going on tech scouts. On TV in LA, we don't go, and we often get killed on locations where a simple fix for bad BG noise would have been available had we been on the scout. I have usually been able to negotiate scout days on low budget stuff for this exact reason. The say, "We're not going ot change the location, so why take you?" - My response is that because of that, it's important to gather information so we are prepared to make their locations work, even if they're not optimal.
  13. Not trying to be funny, but why not swap them at lunch? It will have a marginal effect on overall battery purchase replacement formula, and will insure the IFB doesn't die at an inopportune moment. You can keep running your 520s.
  14. Don't just "point at the mouth". Think of the voice pattern as a ball resting on someone's mouth, and the boom pattern is a cone. You want the ball in the cone. You don't want the person's head in the cone. The higher the mic, the wider the cone gets. You want the cone catching the ball, which is only in front of the actor. If you get too "pointy" with the mic, you get behind the actor and it makes it easier to miss cues when you have to "point" the other way. All the balls collect in front of people who are taking to each other. Cuing back and forth heavily will also cause shifts in background noise in poor locations. That is going to be more noticeable in your final product than being a little loose or a little off mic. Just listen with your ears and try to blend dialog and keep background noise consistent. New boom ops are best served keeping a mic a bit more vertical, a bit higher and more in front of the actors. It'll protect you from missing cues and shifting noise. If it's consistent, a lot will be forgiven. And no noisy pants, as previously advised.