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SDO

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About SDO

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  • Location
    Montreal, QC, Canada
  • Interested in Sound for Picture
    Yes
  • About
    Sound Mixer, Boom Op

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  1. Ok, thanks Constantin for the precision about crosstalk and print-throught. Will do some reading on the subject.
  2. Sending LTC timecode to a camera from an syncbox is not a problem. Timecode signal is like a pulse wave with width modulation. Just make sure that the amplitude is not peaking. I don't think it could bleak to the other track. Maybe i'm mistaken but wasn't the bleading a problem only with tape?
  3. This topic as interesting as it is, concern a reality of producer/distributor controlled tv show. Where time and money are more important than artistic vision and creativity. So sure art or perspective are not part of the choices and decision. As much as the director ( unless he s the producer... ) has almost no saying in the artisitic direction of the show, in the script, of the way he should tell the story, but has to follow a formula , shoot every angle possible, and follow a recipe that producers and distributor choose. Same for all the other crew that work in those show. This is commercial work were the client, as Henchman says it many time, is King , and were the craftsmen has no artistic saying over the client decision. This is junk food formula , even if the cook is a 4 stars chef, (and he better be to do the job right and fast) where hyper realism and a strickly pragmatic vision of sound is the way to go . But it pays the bills... sorry for my bad english for my cynism or lack of romantism but i'm not really shocked or surprised with everything i've been reading about post choices of using only lavs when they have 2 days for dialog on a 42min show with client on their back telling them how they want it to sound. I guess reading from the guy who cut and mix Michael Haneke dialog would be a whole different story... And fortunately there is exceptions to those rules.
  4. Best inside mic for least echo.

    Totally agree And concerning the Super Cmit, after listening to the clip, it seems to be a really good tool mostly for ENG stuff, where post don't have time to work on sound properly or to give editing a "cleaner" worktrack option if nothing else works . Maybe also for IFB in critical environment/locations...
  5. Best inside mic for least echo.

    I've never used the SuperCmit ,only the Cmit, but if you read the information about how the DSP works (based on IIR filters ), it seems (on paper) more efficient then post processing noise removal, mainly because of the use of two capsule, front and rear. It enhance the information of the signal you want to process and further the analyse (under 3Khz) and removal of those unwanted frequency by the help of those 2 signals difference and analyse. Unlike using only a mono signal and then trying to work from this information, in post, to remove noise or echo. Mainly with FFT based algorythm, and with generaly some artifacts if you work on the same freq as the voice, as Michiel just said. The compagny that did the DSP part of the Super Cmit, is releasing a reverb removal tool... http://www.illusonic.com/de-reverb/
  6. Best inside mic for least echo.

    There is plugins ( Unveil and De-Verb) that can remove some of the reverb from recordings. Could be one (semi) solution , if nothing else work. But no magic here. Here's a link that show some examples of it. http://designingsound.org/2013/03/review-of-zynaptiqs-reverb-reduction-processor-unveil/
  7. A Talk with Rupert Neve

    Thanks Vasileios! Extremely interesting master class from Mr. Neve and is philosophy about sound. Stephen de Oliveira
  8. Paul Walker RIP

    Nice Letter from Darryl, Really sad when i heard the news. Worked with him on Brick Mansions this spring. He's daughter was staying with him in Montreal and he was saying how much he wanted to get close to her and spend more time with her. He was a gentlemen and a great person to work with. All my condolences to his family and loved ones.
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