Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'cart'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Main Board
    • Current
    • The Daily Journal
    • General Discussion
    • Equipment
    • Cameras... love them, hate them
    • Recording Direct to Computer
    • Workflow
    • The Post Place
    • Images of Interest
    • Macs... and the other computer
    • All Things Apple
    • Technical Reference
    • Do It Yourself
    • Manufacturers & Dealers
    • Work Available - Available for Work
    • Post to the Host
  • JWSOUND RESOURCE
    • Donate to Support JWSOUNDGROUP

Categories

There are no results to display.


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests


About

Found 23 results

  1. I've had this zuca case for a couple months now and it has worked well when traveling around NYC for small eng and boom op gigs, but I wanted a secure place to put my pole on set as well as give it bigger wheels to better navigate crappy sidewalks. So I finally put some pieces I've been collecting together. Switched out the 4" skate wheels for 8" scooter wheels, sawed off the original front feet and added casters. Attached 2 boom holders on the back using broom holders from the container store (elfa system) and 2" pvc caps protected in the radius of the back wheels.
  2. I recently produced some blueprints for my carts. Here they are. I'm planning further modifications and accessories in the New Year. Any suggestions or requests?
  3. Introducing a new concept in Production Sound Carts for 2016. Thoughts, constructive comments and suggestions please (thanks again for all of those that contributed a few months ago when I posted my Bag Cart concept). Dimensions: 1150mm x 718mm x 715mm Storage: 8u Racking front (19") & Rear (10.5") Weight: Under 14kg Max Load: 40-50kg Wheels: Front 6" & Rear 16" Folded down the dimensions are 1150mm x 718mm x 395mm (including the rear wheel) or 995mm x 718mm x 340mm (without the rear wheel) so ideal for transporting in the boot of a standard hatchback or estate. I am considering a bespoke top handle made of CNC milled aluminium and anodised to match the wheel forks if people would be interested in that. It would add another $150-250 though so won't be including them on the standard model as I want to keep prices as accessible as possible. Further details will be released at www.facebook.com/soundcart in the coming weeks. Your thoughts please...
  4. Hey folks, I finally got my first sound cart going. There were a few things I knew it had to do: 1. It had to be affordable. Very affordable. 2. It needed to be arranged in a way where I could go from a cart-based setup to a run-and-gun setup very quickly. Ideally in less than a minute. 3. It needed to collapse small enough to fit in the back of my Ford Focus. It took me a while to figure this out, but here it is. I already had the SKB case from an old cart I purchased from LSC, but never used. I think it was originally owned by Scott Farr. Luckily, it even had the keyboard and mixing shelf already installed, plus a hook for the headphones. The rest of the shelves I bought from a provider on Amazon. They're made by Penn Elcom, but I noticed that the larger shelves lacked rear support. Again, I built this cart with budget in mind, so that was one concession I had to make. I also knew I needed a design where all the transmitters and such would fit in moldings. That way I could very quickly see that I had all the little pieces of my kit at wrap time. There's been way too much L&D over the years. I just used Pelican foam for that. The only drawback to this design is that the case is now VERY heavy. I have found a way to lift it by myself somewhat safely, but I always look for a hand on set first. The milk crate holds a couple of bags filled with some of the more awkward shaped gear in my kit like chargers and the label maker. The big black bag holds my cables, and I highly recommend it. You can get it here: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00BJ8Q49S/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 Right now, the Octopack uses two small antennas, but I would like to get proper shark fins soon. I also definitely need to get something to hold scripts. On a related note, I went into quite the hole buying all this gear, so if anyone needs a mixer, PLEASE keep me in mind. Thanks for looking!
  5. Matthews DIT Cart is designed to be customized. http://products.msegrip.com/products/kerri-kart
  6. Although I designed the Kerri Kart for the camera department... I think many sound recordists will love this cart. Yes... it uses standard grip gear, perfect for customizing for each production. Please drop by the Matthews Booth C5437 at NAB 2016, and say hello. Bill Kerrigan
  7. This is a photo diary of the birth of my new sound cart. It is based on wooden 8U 19" cases (bought from Thomann) and will have the option of adding more modules. It breaks into single modules for transport in a car. The base will, apart from having wheels, hold things like comtek RX, small playback speakers, spare headphones, and similar stuff you typically need handy only during set-up. It will also contain small mic stands, LPDAs, and a spare Rycote basket. The main module will hold two drawers with TX, lavs, lav accessories, mics, suspensions, TX batteries and so on, and have 4 units of open space to house RX racks, script, comtek TX, headphones, and similar stuff. The recorder will either sit in this compartment as well, or in a bag on top - depending on the kind of job. In the back will be the power compartment with a power supply for 230V external power and a battery compartment (17Ah lead battery and/or 5.2Ah NP). This module can also be taken on a driving car shoot if necessary (though I prefer having only a bag for that kind of shoot). The modules will connect with bolts (Obi - German equivalent of Home Depot). The front door of the main module can be bolted on top and hold the bag, antenna mounts, and a screen. On the sides will be two boom holders and handles. Here are the parcels from Thomann:
  8. Prompted by Jeff's #fbf post on FB today, I'm about to embark on a cover solution to my current cart configuration. I've been in New Mexico for the last 4 months and the wind, dust, rain, etc. that I have experienced has got me thinking. The boat cover, sail maker route seems to be the most logical as is evident by the photo Jeff posted today. Anyone have experience with this in LA? Any recommendations? Thanks in advance. PWP
  9. Not sure whether this is the right place to post this, but I'm looking for something that can be easily installed in a rack to keep the drawer of my mixer from sliding out during travel or while rolling on location. Airliner flightcarts have a very elegant solution (and, I bet, pricy) to keep them from rolling away from their nooks. Also, if I'm not mistaken, Chindha had somethig similar, but I just haven't been able to find any online, and don't even know what they're called… I would be extremely grateful for any suggestions or pointers you may have, even if it's not strictly that kind of latch. I'm open to any suggestion that will resolve this particular issue. TIA! BK
  10. My next cart thinking has to do with the above title. Saw a magnificent upright custom case cart here (will get and post an image of it in due course) here with a hinge top that I imagined might work design-wise to: Lid monitor storage Sides Protect the top shelf Light rain and sun protection Will hold a tarp from monitors and mix surface It will have to be custom, but absolutely doable. Then a sliding shelf to be made out of/on top of extant static mixer shelf so I may draw the mixer back over my knees some. Also custom work, but...I think these things will make the cart perfect and I can quit tweaking for quite some time. Snort. Jan
  11. If you don't know me already, I'm the DP who invented the Jokerbox. I've been a shooter for over twenty years. And right there beside me, through thick and thin, has been the sound man. (or woman) So recently, I designed a Jokerbox bundle thats just right for my brothers and sisters of the sound wave. I took an inventory of the stuff my sound techs were lugging around. I took input about how they would like to use the Jokerbox. (sometimes a lot of input) And what I came up with is the "Jokerbox Audio Bundle". For example, I designed a full size tray that utilizes the entire top level of the Jokerbox. This allows you to move the tray to the top of the cart to keep the items you use most close at hand. And get this, with a simple adapter you can turn the lid on the Jokerbox into a mic stand. For more information, and to see the video, check out the website at www.Jokerboxes.com The Audio Jokerbox Bundle costs $196 and includes free shipping to the contiguous United States.
  12. Hello everyone! I'm back with a few questions about sound carts specifically on sound stages. First off, I am setting up a sound stage cart and I would like to find out and see how other professionals take care of their carts and where they stow them in the stage, how often they do maintenance, etc. etc. So, would any of you be able to help me out and give a brief description of your cart and where you store it and if there are particulars to look out for like how you air-tight enclose it while construction is going on in the stage for a new set, etc. ? I'm looking for specifically where you stow it after shoots, Do you have a climate controlled space? Do you lid it up and tarp it between shoots? How often to you clean and run maintenance checks? Do you have a cart that specifically stays indoors and another one you take outdoors? Thanks! I look forward to your answers!
  13. After a few mods and additions, looks like I'm finally mobile with this bag cart. The best part is it all folds up into a sedan trunk with ease. Now if only I can hire a boom op more often... Thanks to Scott Farr for the folding hand truck
  14. A friendly acquaintance of mine does custom metal fabrication. I'd be curious to know what you think of this http://www.brooklyncustom.com/prototypes.html The cart was commissioned by the US military and was tested in active duty. That leads me to think it would be very expensive, but you might be surprised. Reach out to David if the design invokes your imagination. It can be dragged up stairs, but if I remember correctly the recon team gave it a whirl by tossing it out a high story window, and it didn't pass their final tests. I'd be curious to know from your perspective which features translate to a suitable mixer cart
  15. Chinhda has been pretty busy lately both revising the T-slot cart and making a new product. David
  16. Inovativ provides the film and photography industries with mobile equipment carts specifically designed and constructed to meet their unique needs and overcome the deficiencies of equipment carts currently serving the market. Inovativ carts are compact in design, super strong, balanced, stable, durable and customizable. As a result, our customers will find a significantly better alternative to the equipment carts they are now using. The Scout http://www.inovativcarts.com
  17. I am building my cart and after seeing many people using the yamaha 0196vi as their front end I have decided to use the Midas Venice F as Midas offers far superior audio products to Yamaha and far superior features. Primarily because I like Midas Preamps and because I like the idea of firewire and analog direct outs instead of USB as in the o196vi. My question relates to powering these AC behemoths. I will of course be running on 12 volt DC cart power from my Meon. Is there an efficient way to convert DC to AC for the mixer? I would think that the midas console actually uses DC power internally and converts the AC input to DCinternally. Is there a way to bypass its AC-DC converter and go straight in as DC? Seems silly to convert power twice, that being said does this have any drawbacks (as in are power inverters efficient?). How have other mixers solved this problem when using gear that is designed to be plugged to AC. I have already asked the guys at Midas about it but hoping for some insight from you guys too. Chris
  18. Does anyone have any experience with GoalZero solar panels, their larger solutions look like they could work for a small cart. Is there any reason why they wouldn't work? check out this link http://www.goalzero.com/large-extreme.html
  19. I will be recieving my 788t today and a bag and a BDS, my CL8 and CLwifi next week along with 3 more channels lectro SR/SMV and I already have a great boom kit. I will build my bag rig first and then over the next year transition onto a cart. I will continue to post on my progress. In preparation to utility the third season of the walking dead I am building on Trew Audios Video Assist kit. The main difference in mine is durability and use. First off every show I have been on does not need audio from or to the sound cart from video village. We just need video. My system uses the muxlab 500037 to give us 4 BNC inputs/outputs and no audio. I am going to install all this into a nice aluminum box and put ethercon (neutrik connectors for cat5) wall plates on it. I have to thank several folks in the area for their contributions to this design; including Bartek Swiatek and Michael Clarke who have both taught me loads in my time as utility with them. My bag rig comes in today and I will be building my cart over the next year. -Chris
  20. Hello Everyone, Just got back from getting Axient Certified at Shure out in the Chicago area. Was talking to some of there people about the uses for the system and was curious what people thought of it as a cart system or as a tool for some of the more studio driven reality tv shows. Also if anyone has any questions about it I'm more then happy to answer.
  21. What kind of power strip (using the term loosely) are you using on your carts? I don't have a particularly special one. My setup is: wall or geni power -> power strip -> cart power distro box -> expensive gear I have my AA and 9volt battery chargers in the power strip as well. Should I have a specific power strip? By that, should I have one with a high protection threshold, or noise filtering abilities? I will probably be upgrading the cart power next year (probably something from Remote Audio or PSC). I never noticed any kind of line noise that was because of my AC power. Have I just been lucky? I know that no power strips are 100% effective, but should I be using something better than the fairly generic computer/electronic surge protector I have? Some of my friends that do sound reenforcement type setups can't say enough about the problems they solved by upgrading their power conditioning units. We're in a different situation, but I am not sure if it's luck that I have been ok so far. Offhand the only issues I ever encountered were a charger you could "hear" when it was cycling off an on. I also had an issue when I was trying to use a pure sine wave inverter, the first one I tried caused a terrible buzz that was only fixed by replacing the unit.