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IATSE and AMPTP Ratify "New" Area Standards Agreement


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48 replies to this topic

#1
Richard Lightstone, CAS

Richard Lightstone, CAS
  • LocationLos Angeles

Los Angeles, Sept. 5 – The International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, Moving Picture Technicians, Artists and Allied Crafts (IATSE) and Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers (AMPTP) announced today the ratification of a new Area Standards Agreement. The agreement covers 8,000 IATSE members working in feature film and television production in most areas of the United States outside of the Los Angeles and New York regions. The IATSE and AMPTP reached a tentative agreement on a new contract on August 24th, and the agreement was subsequently ratified by the IATSE General Executive Board.

The new contract, which will run through July 31, 2015, includes 2 percent annual wage increases and an increase in health plan contributions of $5 per day in each year of the three-year agreement.


#2
boomhead

boomhead
  • LocationSF Bay Area
Is this contract available to see online? I've looked at the websites of Local 52 and 695 and can't find it. Any suggestions?

#3
Richard Lightstone, CAS

Richard Lightstone, CAS
  • LocationLos Angeles
Here is a link to the 2009-2012 Agreement. As the report said there is a 2% increase in wages from July 31st 2012. I'm sure every other clause is unchanged.
http://www.usa829.or...t_2009-2012.pdf

#4
mikefilosa

mikefilosa
  • LocationAtlanta, GA
Actually, no mention has been made, yea or nay, to /of any of the AMPTP proposed "interchangeability" provisions -
I am hoping that they quietly didn't accede to any of that - but no one can confirm for me one way or the other.

MF
Michael Filosa, CAS
Atlanta, GA
www.afpusa.tv

#5
Izen Ears

Izen Ears
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA
Yay 2%! At that rate my scale will catch up to the basic agreement in... uh... well, that is to say - never!
Dan Izen

#6
RPSharman

RPSharman
  • LocationCambridge - UK
So sound mixers will continue to earn less than the lowest paid camera assistants.

Well, as the union says, "You can always ask for more." :-)

#7
Henchman

Henchman
  • LocationEncino, CA

So sound mixers will continue to earn less than the lowest paid camera assistants.

Well, as the union says, "You can always ask for more." :-)

If you a making scale, I guess so.
I'm sure there are mixers making more than scale.
That's how it works in my part of the industry.
Re-recording mixers with experience make more than scale.
Scale is a starting point. And a very decent starting point I would like to add.
I don't know what sound mixer scale is. Or what is charged for gear either, so I can't make a comparison.

Addendum.
I see that union scale is $66 an hour, 8 hour minimum.
Anybody complaining about that as a scale rate, needs to have their head examined.
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#8
RPSharman

RPSharman
  • LocationCambridge - UK
ASA scale for sound mixer is $31.02/hr (plus the 2%) - the loader rate for 600 in the regional agreements is $31.90. Operator scale is about $45/hr.

Production sound mixers rarely get over scale.

Basic agreement rate is $66/hr (or about $56 on a weekly, which is what most TV mixers get, which also means straight time for 48.6 hrs) - but most shows are on some special side letter. I don't think any mixers actually getting the Basic Agreement rates are complaining too much, but a good equipment rental is getting trickier.

#9
Henchman

Henchman
  • LocationEncino, CA
Plus, add on the rental package, and it's good money no matter how you slice or dice it.
Comparing it to what a camera assistant or anyone else makes, is pointless.

I just read up on what the camera assistant does, and how one becomes a camera assistant.
And from what I read, it requires a specialized skill set, that takes years to learn. And is not as simple as it sounds.
And I can see where there would en a lot less 1st assistant camera people, then there are mixers.

Same reason there are more experienced SFX and dialog editors and sound designers, that there are re-recording mixers.
And why re-recording mixers generally get paid more.
Its not because what they do is less hard,or less important.

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#10
Henchman

Henchman
  • LocationEncino, CA

Production sound mixers rarely get over scale.
.


I gurantee you they do.
When I moved to LA I was trying to figure out pay rates etc. And most people acted like there are no gurantees at studios anymore, and would pretend that rates are just ok.

Both we completely false statements.

I have learned since, that a lot of re-recording mixers make anywhere from double to triple scale. And that there are feature mixers that have a $500k a year guarantee.

It all depends on teh level of projects you are on, your credit list and above all, your reputation.
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#11
RPSharman

RPSharman
  • LocationCambridge - UK
I'm not talking about 1st ACs. That job is difficult and stressful for sure, and requires knowledge and experience. But they'll always get another take for focus. I'm talking about the loader and 2nd making more than the mixer. I don't care how you slice it, the person recording the words, the performance, has a much greater contribution to the project.

Equipment rental shouldn't count as rate. We make a business investment by buying gear. It's not part of our rate. Camera assistants and operators own gear too. Some own lots. I don't include that in the rate.

And I think you can count on one hand, maybe two, the number of production mixers getting over scale. Post is a whole different story.

#12
Henchman

Henchman
  • LocationEncino, CA
I looked for rates on loaders and 2nds, and so far have found they make nowhere near what mixers scale is.

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#13
Henchman

Henchman
  • LocationEncino, CA
I would also like to point out,that if you think rates are too low now. Then you can imagine what they would be without a union.
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#14
studiomprd

studiomprd
  • LocationHollywood CA
" rates on loaders and 2nds, and so far have found they make nowhere near what mixers scale is. "
of course all this is limited to the IATSE world, and non IA can be all over the place... including Tuna Sub's.
SENATOR Mike Michaels, c.a.s.
Studio M Productions

#15
Mirror

Mirror
Henchman, I see you have little to no experience in production or you wouldn't be saying what you're saying. Post maybe. You don't know what you're talking about. We (production sound mixers) live in that world so we do know what we're talking about. Sharman is correct, you are not. BTW, I have never heard of a production sound mixer making 500K in a year. Ever. Perhaps mixing and dealing blow on the side but 500K is about twice as much as a busy mixer would make. Including gear.
"It is important to remember that government interference always means either violent action or the threat of such action. Government is in the last resort the employment of armed men, of policemen, gendarmes, soldiers, prison guards, and hangmen. The essential feature of government is the enforcement of its decrees by beating, killing, and imprisoning. Those who are asking for more government interference are asking ultimately for more compulsion and less freedom."-- Ludwig von Mises

#16
Henchman

Henchman
  • LocationEncino, CA

Henchman, I see you have little to no experience in production or you wouldn't be saying what you're saying. Post maybe. You don't know what you're talking about. We (production sound mixers) live in that world so we do know what we're talking about. Sharman is correct, you are not. BTW, I have never heard of a production sound mixer making 500K in a year. Ever. Perhaps mixing and dealing blow on the side but 500K is about twice as much as a busy mixer would make. Including gear.

If you re-read my post, you will see that the $500k is in relation to re-recording mixers, as that is what that post was referring to.


" rates on loaders and 2nds, and so far have found they make nowhere near what mixers scale is. "
of course all this is limited to the IATSE world, and non IA can be all over the place... including Tuna Sub's.


Of course.
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#17
Henchman

Henchman
  • LocationEncino, CA
I would be very surprised to see the sound mixer on the Titanic making the same as the sound mixer on say, "Breaking Bad"
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#18
Mirror

Mirror

If you re-read my post, you will see that the $500k is in relation to re-recording mixers, as that is what that post was referring to.




Of course.


You do a lot of comparing apples to oranges and it's hard to keep track with the way you reply to an apples post with your orange answers.

I would love to see your source where you state that a lot of production mixers are getting over scale these days.
"It is important to remember that government interference always means either violent action or the threat of such action. Government is in the last resort the employment of armed men, of policemen, gendarmes, soldiers, prison guards, and hangmen. The essential feature of government is the enforcement of its decrees by beating, killing, and imprisoning. Those who are asking for more government interference are asking ultimately for more compulsion and less freedom."-- Ludwig von Mises

#19
Mirror

Mirror

I would be very surprised to see the sound mixer on the Titanic making the same as the sound mixer on say, "Breaking Bad"


The Titanic was made 15 years ago. They just finished up the last season of Breaking Bad
"It is important to remember that government interference always means either violent action or the threat of such action. Government is in the last resort the employment of armed men, of policemen, gendarmes, soldiers, prison guards, and hangmen. The essential feature of government is the enforcement of its decrees by beating, killing, and imprisoning. Those who are asking for more government interference are asking ultimately for more compulsion and less freedom."-- Ludwig von Mises

#20
Henchman

Henchman
  • LocationEncino, CA

You do a lot of comparing apples to oranges and it's hard to keep track with the way you reply to an apples post with your orange answers.

I would love to see your source where you state that a lot of production mixers are getting over scale these days.


Really?
I think this was pretty clear:

I have learned since, that a lot of re-recording mixers make anywhere from double to triple scale. And that there are feature mixers that have a $500k a year guarantee


As far as LOCATION mixers getting above scale, how about we let some of the resident mixers who work on big budget movies and shows chime in.
Anybody here worked on big budget pilots like "Revolution", or "Wonder Woman" last year.
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#21
Henchman

Henchman
  • LocationEncino, CA

The Titanic was made 15 years ago. They just finished up the last season of Breaking Bad


And? Getting paid over scale, is getting paid over scale. Wether it was yesterday or 15 years ago.
Okay, how about the latest "Batman" then.
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#22
studiomprd

studiomprd
  • LocationHollywood CA
" I would be very surprised to see the sound mixer on the Titanic making the same as the sound mixer on say, "Breaking Bad" "
guess you could be surprised...
just some rambling info to mull...
On Waterworld, which was at tits time the most expensive movie ever, the Mixer was paid scale, as Universal was keeping costs under strict control... Though equipment rentals were generous, BTW, but rates scale, and at least one top mixer turned it down for that reason...
A lot of work at WB is paid weekly scale, even some top shows, so that first unit mixers get a lower rate than day playing 2nd unit mixers...(and also a lot must use WB equipment packages!)...
OTOH, getting a guarantee over minimums, or getting daily when weekly could be paid is getting overscale. in production sound, many boom operators get overscale, by being paid a higher classification rate than the minimum specified by contract.
SENATOR Mike Michaels, c.a.s.
Studio M Productions

#23
RPSharman

RPSharman
  • LocationCambridge - UK

I looked for rates on loaders and 2nds, and so far have found they make nowhere near what mixers scale is.


Before this last 2% raise, the Area Standard Agreement rate for department head (including sound mixer) was $31.02/hr.

The Regional Standard Rate for a Local 600 loader/data wrangler/utility (they do NOT work under the ASA) was $31.90/hr.

The Regional 600 rate for an operator was about $45/hr, as stated above. Other camera rates fall between those two.

If you are using the Basic Agreement as your measurement, then you are correct. But there are VERY few projects shooting under the Basic Agreement outside of Los Angeles. Of course when the show returns to Los Angeles for post, I believe the post crew is paid the rates under the Basic Agreement.

Mixers have left "Breaking Bad" and "Walking Dead" and I suspect some others too because of their rate being $30/hr, and production refused to pay over scale.

#24
Henchman

Henchman
  • LocationEncino, CA

If you are using the Basic Agreement as your measurement, then you are correct. But there are VERY few projects shooting under the Basic Agreement outside of Los Angeles. Of course when the show returns to Los Angeles for post, I believe the post crew is paid the rates under the Basic Agreement.


As I am in LA, What happens in other territories is completely irrelevant.
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#25
Henchman

Henchman
  • LocationEncino, CA

Though equipment rentals were generous, BTW, but rates scale, and at least one top mixer turned it down for that reason...


So, if at least one top mixer turned it down, then by default, there are mixers who get more than scale.
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#26
RPSharman

RPSharman
  • LocationCambridge - UK

As I am in LA, What happens in other territories is completely irrelevant.


For you, yes. But for the production mixers who "move" to these incentive states for work, and who must earn significantly less because of this someone skewed pay scal, the subject is quite relevant.

#27
RPSharman

RPSharman
  • LocationCambridge - UK

So, if one top mixer turned it down, then by default, there are mixers who get more than scale.


As I stated above, you could probably cound that group on one, perhaps two, hands. And it would not be on every movie.

#28
Henchman

Henchman
  • LocationEncino, CA

For you, yes. But for the production mixers who "move" to these incentive states for work, and who must earn significantly less because of this someone skewed pay scal, the subject is quite relevant.

And I'm sure the cost of living is much, much less as well.
I'm not quite sure why anyone would move to make significantly less.
I moved to make significantly more.

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#29
Mirror

Mirror

As I am in LA, What happens in other territories is completely irrelevant.


Please refer to the ORIGINAL topic of this thread.

And I'm sure the cost of living is much, much less as well.
I'm not quite sure why anyone would move to make significantly less.
I moved to make significantly more.


90% of production is now done outside of L.A. It is better to move and work at a lower pay than it is to not work at all.
"It is important to remember that government interference always means either violent action or the threat of such action. Government is in the last resort the employment of armed men, of policemen, gendarmes, soldiers, prison guards, and hangmen. The essential feature of government is the enforcement of its decrees by beating, killing, and imprisoning. Those who are asking for more government interference are asking ultimately for more compulsion and less freedom."-- Ludwig von Mises

#30
Mirror

Mirror

And? Getting paid over scale, is getting paid over scale. Wether it was yesterday or 15 years ago.
Okay, how about the latest "Batman" then.


Apples and oranges again.

Being that Batman is a Warner show, I would be shocked to hear it was over scale.
"It is important to remember that government interference always means either violent action or the threat of such action. Government is in the last resort the employment of armed men, of policemen, gendarmes, soldiers, prison guards, and hangmen. The essential feature of government is the enforcement of its decrees by beating, killing, and imprisoning. Those who are asking for more government interference are asking ultimately for more compulsion and less freedom."-- Ludwig von Mises

#31
RPSharman

RPSharman
  • LocationCambridge - UK

And I'm sure the cost of living is much, much less as well.
I'm not quite sure why anyone would move to make significantly less.
I moved to make significantly more.


Ummm... because that's where the work is. It won't be long before other states follow NY's lead and offer huge incentives to move post production facilities into their states. You might find your tune changing when that day comes. Or perhaps it won't affect you.

I'm still in Los Angeles, and doing quite well, but I am concerned for my fellow sound department members and how this all affects them.

#32
Jeff Wexler

Jeff Wexler
  • LocationSanta Monica, CA USA

As I am in LA, What happens in other territories is completely irrelevant.

Please, Henchman, this "discussion" needs to stay on topic and try and be a little more careful with the numbers. The statement "What happens in other territories is completely irrelevant" is totally inappropriate. The Area Standards Agreement (the main title of this topic) doesn't apply to work being done in Los Angeles... so, if you live in L.A. and therefore find the discussion of "what happens in other territories" irrelevant, I would strongly suggest you S . T . F . U . and exit this topic. Start another thread, please, about how RE-recording mixers working in Los Angeles make upwards of 500K a year (also not entirely true but oh well) and you may find yourself in the company of ONE.

I am not going to bother to refute some of the other declarations of fact that you have put up here but I will say that I have done some really, really big budget movies and worked at SCALE, and I have done some really little movies with basically no money that have paid me over scale. And I will add that we should never consider equipment rental in the equation when we are talking about hourly rates of pay --- the "hourly" part refers to the hours of our lives that the employer gets of our labor in return for the rate being paid. Whether we get equipment rental money (because we own equipment and run a SEPARATE rental business with its own set of rental rates) IS irrelevant as is any discussion of cost of living, the possibility of quality of life issues depending on where we live, etc.

Okay, RANT OFF (for now, but I hope this is read carefully and appropriate behavior follows).
Jeff Wexler, CAS
Santa Monica, California
 
"I don't care if you've got ninety tracks... what does it sound like, baby"
- Ray Charles

#33
Henchman

Henchman
  • LocationEncino, CA
As far as my opinion, what happens in other territories being irrelevant, the point is looking at the OP, it refers to a Los Angeles article, but I realize it's about the entire US.
It's not that I don't care about other states, but when I see people who are here in LA complaining about rates, then it's an LA based discussion. I looked up what a sound mixer gets paid under the basic agreement here in LA, and they make way more than a camera assistant.

And my point about re-recording overs and what they actually get paid, was that it was from personal experience. People pretending that rates are lower than they really are. And as you yourself have stated Jeff, you work on projects where you get more than scale, and you work on projects where you don't. I doubt you are the only one.
This nonsense that nobody ever gets over scale, is just that.

As far as rentals go, IMO, what you make form the rentals is income. Pure and simple. Its not part of your rate, but it is most certainly income, no matter how you twist or turn it.

And if this is such a low paying, crappy way to make a living. Why would anybody do it?
Oh, right. Because it's not.
Some people just like to bitch no matter what.
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#34
Jeff Wexler

Jeff Wexler
  • LocationSanta Monica, CA USA
"As far as my opinion, what happens in other territories being irrelevant, the point is looking at the OP, it refers to a Los Angeles article, but I realize it's about the entire US."

It's NOT about the entire US, that's the first thing you are confused about. It cannot be about the entire US because there are jobs done on the East Coast and the West Coast that typically DO NOT have anything to do with Area Standards rates (the TITLE of this topic).

"It's not that I don't care about other states, but when I see people who are here in LA complaining about rates, then it's an LA based discussion."

Wrong again. Thew only thing you do have right here is that the DISCUSSION is taking place amongst many people, some of which are based in LA (but obviously it is a discussion that is open to and participated in by many others who do NOT live in Los Angeles, and several people who do not even live in the US!). I live in Los Angeles, I am talking about this from my home in Santa Monica, I am complaining about the RATES because they STINK and it affects us all whether you find it to be irrelevant or not. It's sort of like "well, it's not happening to me so why should I give a hoot". Not a great attitude and not at all supportive of our community of sound professionals, the very core and raison d'etre for this site.

"I looked up what a sound mixer gets paid under the basic agreement here in LA, and they make way more than a camera assistant."

And if that very same sound mixer and the very same camera assistant take a job outside LA where they are offering employment at rates under the Area Standards contract, the sound mixer could very well be making less than the AC.

"And my point about re-recording overs and what they actually get paid, was that it was from personal experience."

I am a member of the Editors Guild, some of my best friends over the years have been in post, and I am well aware of their position in the industry and what their earning potential is. I also know, from many personal conversations, that they are concerned (which you evidently are not) about the erosion of rates here, in other states and around the world, since they understand that this has an affect on the entire industry (even if it doesn't directly affect their income today).

"And as you yourself have stated Jeff, you work on projects where you get more than scale, and you work on projects where you don't. I doubt you are the only one."

Again, you missed the main focus of THIS topic --- the Area Standards contract and rates of pay. Very few if any of the production sound mixers who work in other states under the Area Standards contract make over scale deals ... period. This is the fact.

"This nonsense that nobody ever gets over scale, is just that."

Wrong again. Not nonsense... reality. I think you would be surprised how few sound mixers even working under the best rates of the West Coast Basic Agreement make over scale deals.

"As far as rentals go, IMO, what you make form the rentals is income. Pure and simple. Its not part of your rate, but it is most certainly income, no matter how you twist or turn it."

So, money I make from a business I started making bio-degradable water bottles out of hemp is income, but so what? This has no bearing on the discussion of hourly rates of pay for our labor on a job. It does, of course, have relevance to each individual's personal financial situation and lifestyle, but that's not what this discussion is all about. If you are interested, we could have a discussion about the erosion of rental rates over the years and how that particular revenue stream for those who own their own equipment has gone through massive changes.

"And if this is such a low paying, crappy way to make a living. Why would anybody do it?
Oh, right. Because it's not.
Some people just like to bitch no matter what."

And some people like to engage in extended combative conversations riddled with diversions, inaccuracies and lies just because they love the sound of their own voice.
Jeff Wexler, CAS
Santa Monica, California
 
"I don't care if you've got ninety tracks... what does it sound like, baby"
- Ray Charles

#35
Henchman

Henchman
  • LocationEncino, CA
Quite tho contrary Jeff, I do give a hoot.
Which is why I am a very vocal supporter of the Union.

Why do you think rates have been eroded, and in what way?
And if a camera assistant IS making more in some cases, then it seems they must have a stronger union.
Why is that?

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#36
Jeff Wexler

Jeff Wexler
  • LocationSanta Monica, CA USA

Quite tho contrary Jeff, I do give a hoot.
Which is why I am a very vocal supporter of the Union.

Why do you think rates have been eroded, and in what way?
And if a camera assistant IS making more in some cases, then it seems they must have a stronger union.
Why is that?

There are no simple or quick answers to your questions above. Certainly the overall erosion of pay rates, if we really want to thoroughly discuss the root causes, would be a lengthy conversation. The Camera Union (or "Guild" as they are called) is not a "stronger union" --- it is the same union, the I.A.T.S.E., but the Camera Guild has a national CONTRACT. It is this national contract that levels the rates of pay across all the states in the United States. Sound people, on the other hand, while members of the I.A.T.S.E., are members of various Locals, locals which work under specific contracts. Those contracts do not necessarily travel so well. By that I mean there are all sorts of conditions, many of them contested and contentious, when a member in one local travels to work in another state. By the rules of the contract, for example, if I am hired for a job and I am a member of Local 695 (here in LA) and my deal comes under the West Coast Basic Agreement, my wages (scale wages) and working conditions (when I go into overtime, when I get meal penalty payments, etc.) are all set --- the employer cannot violate this and it doesn't matter where we are actually working. But, on the same job, the production can hire another sound mixer (for 2nd Unit work for example) in Georgia where we're shooting and that mixer will be working under a DIFFERENT CONTRACT with much lower rates of pay and often different rules regarding working conditions. The camera person, on the other hand, wherever they are hired and wherever they are working, benefits from a scale rate of pay that is uniform across the US.
Jeff Wexler, CAS
Santa Monica, California
 
"I don't care if you've got ninety tracks... what does it sound like, baby"
- Ray Charles

#37
jacefivesound

jacefivesound
  • LocationBoston, MA

But, on the same job, the production can hire another sound mixer (for 2nd Unit work for example) in Georgia where we're shooting and that mixer will be working under a DIFFERENT CONTRACT with much lower rates of pay and often different rules regarding working conditions.


So, so true. And some places the cost of living is less, others, not so much. Although I understand the ASA, and recently even spoke with president Loeb about it, I still feel (as sound department members) being divided into separate contracts only weakens us as a whole.
Jason Fyrberg

#38
Henchman

Henchman
  • LocationEncino, CA
Everyone would benefit from combining all union locals into one big union.
Just as the mpeg did with soundeditng and mixing.

I don't understand why sound mixers themselves have not been mobilizing to make this happen. It's a win win situation all around.

I'm truly baffled.
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#39
studiomprd

studiomprd
  • LocationHollywood CA
" Everyone would benefit from combining all union locals into one big union. "
for now, consider the advantages of L695 becoming part of L600
SENATOR Mike Michaels, c.a.s.
Studio M Productions

#40
afewmoreyears

afewmoreyears
  • LocationWestern United States

Everyone would benefit from combining all union locals into one big union.
Just as the mpeg did with soundeditng and mixing.

I don't understand why sound mixers themselves have not been mobilizing to make this happen. It's a win win situation all around.

I'm truly baffled.

Because they are all loosers with no balls... ;D

Only kidding...

#41
Henchman

Henchman
  • LocationEncino, CA

Because they are all loosers with no balls... ;D

Only kidding...

Well, I think it comes down to too many people not being involved enough.
It's so easy to sit back and complain, and expect someone else to fix the problem.

It doesn't work that way.

" Everyone would benefit from combining all union locals into one big union. "
for now, consider the advantages of L695 becoming part of L600


That would be a smart move, IMO.
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#42
Jeff Wexler

Jeff Wexler
  • LocationSanta Monica, CA USA

Everyone would benefit from combining all union locals into one big union.
Just as the mpeg did with soundeditng and mixing.

I don't understand why sound mixers themselves have not been mobilizing to make this happen. It's a win win situation all around.

I'm truly baffled.

Nothing baffling about it. All of us union members, production sound mixers, boom operators, re-recording mixers, ADR mixers, sound editors, etc., we're all in the SAME union. The differences are the "Locals" that we are in which was based on where we have permanent residence. All of this changed when the various camera Locals were merged into one "local" with a national contract. All sound people, production and post, used to be in various locals around the country with the main locals being Local 695 on the West Coast and Local 52 on the East Coast. About 10 years ago (maybe more, I've sort of lost track) all the POST production sound people were moved into the Editors Guild. Production Sound people remained in the various locals (again, primarily L695 and L52) across the country. So, what is this lack of "mobilization" you are so baffled by? As members of Local 695, for example, working under the Basic Agreement (with pretty damn good rates as you always point out), what sort of mobilization could our members (only 1500 of us) do to affect radical changes in the way in which the International operates? You have to remember, the merger of the 2 big camera locals (L659 on the West Coast and L644 on the East Coast) was not member initiated --- there wasn't this big mobilization or uprising to force the I.A. to make a national guild (union local) with a national contract. And, the post-production sound people's move into L700 (Editors Guild) was also something that the International unilaterally initiated.
Jeff Wexler, CAS
Santa Monica, California
 
"I don't care if you've got ninety tracks... what does it sound like, baby"
- Ray Charles

#43
Izen Ears

Izen Ears
  • LocationNew Orleans, LA
Um. No one worth their salt works for the ASA scale, I never have. It's a bullshit rate compared to camera, but ESPECIALLY compared to the sound people on the basic agreement. I personally have no idea how to combat working for scale other than "no thanks." Just imagine what would happen if we all said that... What a nice dream.
Dan Izen

#44
bigmaho

bigmaho
  • LocationNY and NM

Really?
I think this was pretty clear:



As far as LOCATION mixers getting above scale, how about we let some of the resident mixers who work on big budget movies and shows chime in.
Anybody here worked on big budget pilots like "Revolution", or "Wonder Woman" last year.


When I work on motion pictures and tv I get NY / Local 52 scale which ranges from $48-55/hour. When I work out of town in ASA contract areas I usually negotiate to NY or LA scale. I work the big films and the little. Rates are about the same. The only wiggle room is in equipment rentals. LA mixer rates are a bit better.

#45
SoundHound

SoundHound
Wow! How the mighty have fallen since I retired 9 years ago (just slipped form the "Roster" a few months ago by choice). Regardless of wages the Production Sound Mixer is the head of a (very small) department and "The Keeper of the Flame" for an entire medium-Sound.

For the 37 years I worked the "Mixer" was, typically, the second highest paid crew behind the DP. Inconceivable that the Mixer is paid at or below any AC in this century. In 1990 I grossed over $250,000 (my best year-don't imagine that's $500K in 2012 $$$ though) with a 6 months series (and other work but not 52 weeks) including lots of equipment. Just my 2 cents for perspective.

And as to the topic please listen to JW who is very successful, very experienced with so many decades in the biz. And O. K. I'll say it he's a Legend. Because a good forum is not about winning at semantics but learning and helping each other.



#46
Henchman

Henchman
  • LocationEncino, CA
As a re-recording mixer, I wish location guys still had the power and say they once had on set.
IMDB Credits

Living the Dream

#47
Michael P Clark

Michael P Clark
  • LocationAtlanta, Georgia, USA


Mixers have left "Breaking Bad" and "Walking Dead" and I suspect some others too because of their rate being $30/hr, and production refused to pay over scale.

 

Robert, this information, at least for "The Walking Dead", is incorrect in regards to rate. I can't answer for the mixers that left the show, on their own accord, but this was not the rate they were working at.


Michael P. Clark, CAS
Atlanta, GA


#48
RPSharman

RPSharman
  • LocationCambridge - UK

Robert, this information, at least for "The Walking Dead", is incorrect in regards to rate. I can't answer for the mixers that left the show, on their own accord, but this was not the rate they were working at.

 

Thanks, Michael.  That's good to know it wasn't minimum.  Perhaps the rate was higher, but not a high enough (Basic Agreement) rate.  Maybe the same for "Breaking Bad" too.

 

Sorry for the misinformation.



#49
studiomprd

studiomprd
  • LocationHollywood CA

speaking of contracts....

SAG-AFTRA has a new contract for commercials

http://www.hollywood...-details-438718

 

" One-time 6 percent increase. The increase is effective over the term of the contract (April 1, 2013 – March 31, 2016) and is mathematically equivalent to 2.9% annual increases. That compares with the 2 percent annual increases that have become customary in Hollywood labor deals. "


SENATOR Mike Michaels, c.a.s.
Studio M Productions