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Olle Sjostrom

The Ultimate Wireless Frequency List

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A quick google took me to Ireland's department of communications website. Wasn't very helpful though. In the EU in general (please someone correct me if I'm mistaken), everything within 470-790 is license required but you can use it... The spectrums around 820 and upward are usually free to use but might come with transmission power restrictions.. Also I would believe the UK frequencies are a good pointer to where you might legally be OK to transmit. Now as far as actual usability goes... That's something different. And I AM working on a wiki type we page where users can actually fill personal information on which frequencies worked where and when. So that'll hopefully be a good tool whenever it's done..

But still; use your ears and plan frequencies after what seems to give you the best results range and audio wise.

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Siddho   

 

In Ireland the official frequencies are the same as the UK, channel 38. PM me if you wish and I will try to give you some more information.

 

 

ah, thanks a lot Barry for the info. Great help. Am I right then in assuming that channel 70 (863 MHz to 865 MHz) will also be OK to use?

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Hi Siddho,

Theoretically that should be fine but things aren't as regulated in Ireland as in the UK. I have been using the 606 band and Lectro block 24 for a while now but I couldn't be sure about channel 70.

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What's the status on this endeavor?? I want more! I'm hungry for wireless knowledge.

Not sure if this can be fit into this thread as well, or if someone can redirect me to another thread that's more appropriate... but I was wondering if there is a more updated version of Lectrosonic's wireless guide (the last one was from like 2000). Or anything similar to it. 

Wireless keeps changing, especially lately. So anything accurate to the past several months maybe? Might be a good addendum to the wiki.

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" Wireless keeps changing, "

sure, some things change, like the frequency assignments,  but the technical basics remain pretty much the same, and the information in the Lectrosonics wireless guide is still applicable.

 

personally, the ultimate wireless frequency list reads:

50MHz - 4.8GHz, subject to local government frequency allocations

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" Wireless keeps changing, "

sure, some things change, like the frequency assignments,  but the technical basics remain pretty much the same, and the information in the Lectrosonics wireless guide is still applicable.

 

personally, the ultimate wireless frequency list reads:

50MHz - 4.8GHz, subject to local government frequency allocations

Yes, the fundamentals remain constant. But I would assume that the application of said fundamentals must vary in SOME way depending on the changing frequency assignments, different regulations, new technology, etc. 

I'm just asking if there's any piece of reading that I can get at that might enlighten me, as well as others who want to study up and stay educated.

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"any piece of reading that I can get at that might enlighten me "

lots of them

most of the wireless microphone manufacturers have "wireless guides", including not only our usual suspects Lectrosonics, Sennheiser), but also the companies that are huge in the live performance, and other uses of wireless microphones (Shure, Audio Technica); the information in these guides is completely relevant.

in addition most of these same companies have some frequency selection information on their sites, along with plenty of FAQ's, and specvific product information.  reminder: Television broadcasters are only a piece of the actual interference picture that will be encountered in use, and interference varies greatly from time to time, and from place to place.

Now, if that stuff isn't sufficient, or technical enough for you, perhaps you will find what you are looking for at other places, like the ARRL website www.arrl.org and their many books, including the annual "Handbook", and "Antenna Book" publications.  There are numerous sources for radio and or antenna theory and operation information (Google is your friend); and then there is always the wealth of information in the archives of jwsoundgroup.net. as well as the constant articles in various publications for professionals and even prosumers...

warning: physics and math are involved!

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"any piece of reading that I can get at that might enlighten me "

lots of them

most of the wireless microphone manufacturers have "wireless guides", including not only our usual suspects Lectrosonics, Sennheiser), but also the companies that are huge in the live performance, and other uses of wireless microphones (Shure, Audio Technica); the information in these guides is completely relevant.

in addition most of these same companies have some frequency selection information on their sites, along with plenty of FAQ's, and specvific product information.  reminder: Television broadcasters are only a piece of the actual interference picture that will be encountered in use, and interference varies greatly from time to time, and from place to place.

Now, if that stuff isn't sufficient, or technical enough for you, perhaps you will find what you are looking for at other places, like the ARRL website www.arrl.org and their many books, including the annual "Handbook", and "Antenna Book" publications.  There are numerous sources for radio and or antenna theory and operation information (Google is your friend); and then there is always the wealth of information in the archives of jwsoundgroup.net. as well as the constant articles in various publications for professionals and even prosumers...

warning: physics and math are involved!

YES! Awesome! Thank you!

Haha, well my dad is a robotics programmer and machinist, and my brother is a mechanical engineer. Growing up in a household like that, you get to have a pretty good understanding of mathematics and physics. I actually almost got into that myself, until I started working in film. So, yes, the more technical, the better.

Once again, thank you for the useful post.

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Now, if that stuff isn't sufficient, or technical enough for you, perhaps you will find what you are looking for at other places, like the ARRL website www.arrl.org and their many books, including the annual "Handbook", and "Antenna Book" publications. 

So there are TONS of books on there... All of which are ~$30+ 

I'm assuming for the annual handbook, it should be this one: 

http://www.arrl.org/shop/2014--Handbook-Softcover-Centennial-Edition/

 

But there are like 10 different ones on antennas. Is there a preferred one? Lol I can't afford them all.

Also, I'm not in ham radio at all. Not sure if that changes anything.

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I suggest you digest all of the various free wireless guides available on the manufacturers' websites...ander through the FAQ's...

do some searching, as the various AV magazines, Systems Contractors and Film Video magazines are frequently doing helpful, though sometimes basic articles...

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Reviving this thread, I'm heading to Argentina in a week and wanted to know if there were frequencies that worked better than others. I currently own Lectro Block 21 and 22, can rent if needed. Thanks in advance.

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One issue to be aware of is that there are frequencies that can get you in trouble with certain governments, depending on where and how you use them. I would be wary of using any U.S. block unless I checked with the government regulations on transmitter strength and frequency. I believe Japan has regulated wireless transmitters down to 10mW, as one example, just to curb RFI.

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I also have some international stuff coming up and wanted to see if anyone here could help with a few of the countries below. My main concern is being able to bring this wireless gear into these countries legally. I'd hate to bring it knowing it will probably work in our remote locations, only for it to be turned away because of local regulations I'm unfamiliar with. Several of the other places are already listed. Thanks for the hard work, Olle (and friends)!

 

  1. Iceland
  2. Italy
  3. Croatia
  4. Malta
  5. New Guinea
  6. Honduras
  7. British Virgin Islands
  8. Vietnam

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