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" MY NEXT COMPUTER WILL BE A PC. "

yes, but will it be a Mac, from Apple ?

Knock it off...  we've been through all this. The Mac is a personal computer but it is not a PC.

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There are several types of computing. There is a desktop personal computer, there is a laptop personal computer, there is a tablet personal computer there are handheld personal computers and there are other types of personal computers.

If you have it, and it's some type of computer, it's still a PC (personal computer)

PCs can be intel, atom, amd, etc. based.

Those processors can run osx, windows, linux, unix, android, etc..

Apple strictly runs OSX or IOS on the hardware they use, and lock it down so thats ALL it can use. It's a proprietary OS for their company.

Other manufacturers like dell, sony, Samsung, and HP pick and choose with different models and brands, and do not use proprietary OSs

 

 

 

personal computer  noun
 
: a general-purpose computer equipped with a microprocessor and designed to run especially commercial software (as a word processor or Internet browser) for an individual user

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Chris, are you nuts? "Apple strictly runs OSX or IOS on the hardware they use, and lock it down so thats ALL it can use. It's a proprietary OS for their company." Apple was the first to offer, on their hardware, dual-boot, Apple OSX.x or Windows OS, or Linux, or...

In fact, for many people, the Mac runs Windows OS and Windows applications better than their Windows only PC. And then their is the Hackintosh --- a PC running some variety of the Mac OS.

 

Again, I agree that any computing device that is used personally can be referred to as a "personal computer" or "pc" if you prefer. But in the popular vernacular (and for the last 20 years or so) referring to a computer as a "PC" means that it is a computing device (hardware) from any company OTHER than Apple, and using an Operating System typically and historically from Microsoft beginning with MS-DOS then "progressing" on to the various DOS shells that were the early versions of Windows, and on and on.

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Jeff,

I guess he meant that Apple converted to hardware that was historically running windows/Linux operation system after they realized that their PowerPC ibm architecture was going nowhere.

And yes OSX is just another operation system running on intels "PC" x86-64 architecture Making it no different then any "PC".

Running osx86 on a "PC" made by apple or any other computer manufacture does not make any difference. In fact a lot of windows "PCs" have exactly the same hardware as their apple counterparts.

I7 on apple is exactly the same on a ASUS.

Same goes for video cards and other parts.

 

I think every apple user should bow and give their respect to Microsoft,intel,amd,ati,nvidia and others for paving the way for the fast modern computing.

(:

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Thanks, Rado, for the history lesson and the clarification of hardware and architecture (though I already knew that). My point is, and always has been, more about the LANGUAGE and the way we speak about our computers, regardless of the path of development of the hardware and software (operating systems) they have used. Here is a little test you (and Senator) can do. Ask 10 people at random "what is a PC?" and also ask them "what is a computer made by Apple?". I can virtually guarantee you the answers will be something on the lines of what I have been talking about: a PC is a computer running Windows, a computer from Apple is a Mac. If you press further, people will agree both the PC and the Mac are personal computers, but only one of them is a PC. Another variation on this survey would be to ask people "what computer do you use?". They will invariably answer that either they use a PC or that they use a Mac. If they are a Mac user they may say that they use "an Apple" but they will never say that they use a PC. I will add that the basic consumer, the person who just uses their computer for personal stuff, will not care or even have followed the various chipsets or architecture employed over the years by the manufacturer of the personal computer they use.

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I think every apple user should bow and give their respect to Microsoft,intel,amd,ati,nvidia and others for paving the way for the fast modern computing.

 

Should every PC user bow down to Steve Wozniak then?

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Should every PC user bow down to Steve Wozniak then?

Yes. And every Sound Devices user should bow to Zaxcom. And so on. Oh no, why does it suddenly feel like I'm burning?

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All computers are all the same, they get faster, they fail, they achieve, they help, they complicate, they're always obsolete, they got us to the moon, they allow NSA to spy, they create useless arguments, and they make the designer rich because you must have one.   ::)

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I was troubleshooting a new MacPro this weekend, moving Pro Tools cards back and forth between the new and old computer. I'm thinking a small, powerful computer with various thunderbolt devices daisy chained might actually simplify things.

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Of course it will. The new Mac Pro just represents a different approach which ultimately will move things forward in a good way. All those people who were clamoring for an updated or new Mac Pro (to replace their aging Mac Pro tower), what did they want the new one to be? Good article (one person's opinion) appeared in Macworld online today. It's a good READ.

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I remember when the '5 Flavor' iMacs appeared. The PC pundits predicted absolute failure for the design and concept. As it turned out, it really helped resurrect the company. After that, translucent turquoise was everywhere.  It's all about thinking outside the box.

 

Hard to predict about the new Mac Pro, but I would hesitate to declare it doomed just yet.

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I remember when the '5 Flavor' iMacs appeared. The PC pundits predicted absolute failure for the design and concept. As it turned out, it really helped resurrect the company. After that, translucent turquoise was everywhere.  It's all about thinking outside the box.

 

Hard to predict about the new Mac Pro, but I would hesitate to declare it doomed just yet.

 

There are far too many people who do not hesitate at all in declaring that the latest great thing from Apple is a disaster and will fail. Fortunately, it has never worked out that way, for Apple or for the millions of satisfied users of Apple products and services. I wonder if Michael Dell took his own advice and sold all his Apple shares way back when. I guess he missed out on the over 1000% increase in the value of the company that he insisted should do the right thing and close up shop.

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I remember when the '5 Flavor' iMacs appeared. The PC pundits predicted absolute failure for the design and concept.

 

Didn't the early iMacs have 75% drive failure rate due to heat and had to be redesigned?

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A list of Apple worst products and biggest failures :)

 

http://www.digitaltrends.com/features/apples-worst-products-and-biggest-failures/

 

I didn't want to be forced into posting lists to support my discussion. I will resist, but the list that I would post would be the long running list "predictions" about the death of Apple that have been going on almost since the beginning of the company. Of course Apple has had some mis-steps and some failed products, but my point was that with EVERY new product, even before it has had a chance to either succeed or fail, there have been people who have slammed them as dismal failures from day one.

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