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jgbsound

Multi-Mono vs Multichannel plug-ins in ProTools.

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So I'm wondering if someone could explain the fundamental difference between multi-mono and multi-channel plugins in Protools?

 

From what I understand the multi-mono plugins are good for unlinking the functions within the plugin and treating each channel to different values separately. 

 

Whereas the multi-channel plugins are good for "correlated processing" (one process that relies on another in the same effects chain?).

 

But doesn't this happen with either plugin type, by the fact that you have one plugin inserted above the next in the chain?

 

When would this be any different?  The only example I could think of is side-chaining.

 

Is my thinking wrong about this?

 

Could you give me an example of how you would use one over the other in a particular situation?

 

Thanks!

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Simply put, you can apply the same settings to all channels (multi-channel or linked), or you can apply independent settings to every channel (multi-mono).

 

More elaborately, multi-channel plugins are concerned with the stereo or surround field; what ever processing you do on one channel affects the processing done on the other channel(s).

 

Multi-channel makes most sense when doing spatial DSP, such as Reverb. You may use multi-mono when you want to control any channel independently from the others, such as in a multi-band compressor.

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Typically multi-band compressors split the frequency bands into low, low-mid, high-mid and highs. The frequency, bandwidth and the other normal compressor/limiter adj. parameters such as threshold, ratio, attack, release, ect., are user adjustable as well..

As José stated, these processors can be mono, stereo or multichannel.

There are many to choose from in all the plug-in formats, free and otherwise.

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Typically multi-band compressors split the frequency bands into low, low-mid, high-mid and highs. The frequency, bandwidth and the other normal compressor/limiter adj. parameters such as threshold, ratio, attack, release, ect., are user adjustable as well..

As José stated, these processors can be mono, stereo or multichannel.

There are many to choose from in all the plug-in formats, free and otherwise.

 

Correct, though my statement was not pertaining to frequency bands. I was just stating that it a multi-band compressor is available and sometimes used in multi-mono.

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I think I understand better now.  Thanks guys.  I guess I was using them correctly, but purely through intuition (okay mostly through trial and error), but was always curious about the difference.

 

 

Thanks!

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There are specific reasons for using multi-mono or multi-channel.

The obvious is that multi-mono plugins can have independent settings for each channel, but that's the the tip of the iceberg.

 

If, for instance, you are applying reverb for surround mixing using a multi-mono plugin, you aren't allowing each channel to interact (in essence you are putting a mono reverb on each channel, so that if you pan something toward one channel, you will only be getting reverb from that channel). Sometimes this is desirable. Sometimes it isn't.

 

A more common use for me is applying limiting to masters, specifically, when doing multiple stages of limiting. I'll sometimes use multi-mono (or unlinked L-R), followed by normal stereo limiting. This allows you to deal with some of the stray side peaks without causing the  whole mix to be affected. Of course, over-use of this can make the stereo center move around, so don't overuse it.

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