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Dan Ostroff

Orca OR-30 and Stingray for 633 Side by Side Comparison?

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Was wondering if anyone had posted a side by side picture of the Orca OR-30 and Stingray for 633 bags next to each other for size comparison?  I searched around but wasn't able to find a picture.  Pardon if it has been posted as I may have missed it.

 

Thanks!

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While we're at it, I'm also interested in seeing an Orca-32 Stingray for 664 side by side comparison as well.  If anyone can post some side by side pics, it will be greatly appreciated.

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I haven't seen any pictures of both of them next to each other, but I've seen both of them in person. The OR-30 has a slightly smaller footprint; shorter about 2-3 inches, less wide about 4 inches, and slightly narrower about an inch or two than the stingray. Both offer slightly different options, and both have excellent build quality. Here's some individual pictures of folks who've posted their bag rigs:

 

Kevin Hastings' OR-30 with 633:
10636237_2165619783541_40663796350823783

10694282_2199966362184_61904888985267992

 

 

 

Jim Hulse's Stingray with 633:

10676396_10100510573323998_5259366394149

 

Jeffrey Muria's stingray with 633:

10678631_10152609775975751_5040645888329

 

Sebastian Dunn's stingray with 633:

1538731_10152580379726505_40914359449350

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Keep in mind that "side-by-side" can be misleading. One manufacturer may use flaps that can be pulled in tight that lead to a smaller footprint, while another may offer much easier access to panels while protecting connections better.

I'm a big fan of keeping a bag small and tidy, but we must keep in mind all aspects of actually using the bag to make the best critical decision.

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Point taken although just seeing the bags (loaded or unloaded) directly next to each other is helpful, just as it was/is to see all of the mixer/recorders stacked on each other.  I don't have the option of seeing them in person before purchase so just trying to get a look at them next to each other.

 

 

Keep in mind that "side-by-side" can be misleading. One manufacturer may use flaps that can be pulled in tight that lead to a smaller footprint, while another may offer much easier access to panels while protecting connections better.

I'm a big fan of keeping a bag small and tidy, but we must keep in mind all aspects of actually using the bag to make the best critical decision.

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Hey Dan,

 

You can see the weight and dimensions on both Stingrays here:

http://ktekbooms.com/products/audio/audio-bags/the-stingray-audio-bag/

 

The Stingray for the Maxx and 633 (Model number KSRA1) is the first audio bag to include a rigid internal frame and RF shielding in the internal padded divider. Another thing to consider is that the Stingrays are the only audio bags made by an audio company. The designs are done by me with the input of the professional sound community. There are a couple of things you need to consider when making this purchase. 

 

The depth of the Stingray is very specific. It allows you to use the largest size external sony camera batteries on the back of the machine. Some people run these as a battery backup on the 633. The depth is also specific for the inputs on the Maxx. I wanted to make sure people don't have to use right angle XLR connectors on the inputs if they don't have them already. This depth is also very handy for running cables to wireless receivers and and power cables. 

 

The internal frame is designed in a such a way that access to the media on the 633 is very easy. You don't have to move the 633 up or down in the bag to get to it. 

 

Rather than do the typical thing with a big front storage pouch, I moved that pouch to the sides. I did this for two reasons. 

-Physics...The more weight you put further out from your body the further out your center of gravity goes. Thus, your body has to do more work to stay upright. Moving the pocket to the sides brings that extra weight closer to the body. 

-Access - When you have a big pocket on the front of the bag, it can be hard to get to. With the pockets close to you they are easy to get to, especially with one hand. 

 

The sides open up completely. This allows easy access to everything you need. 

 

The side flaps have outer pockets as well as mesh inner pockets. These pockets have a velcro opening on the bottom so you can run cables into them. 

 

There is a trap door on the bottom of the bag that opens easily and quickly making running cables into the bag super easy. 

 

The side flaps have 6 zippers each so you can run cables into the sides but still keep the sides zipped up. 

 

There is enough room on the inside main compartment for up to 4 receivers (8 channels with dual receivers). Some people only use a few receivers and may put an NP1 in a receiver spot. I wanted to have it so you don't have to strap receivers on the outside of the bag, but the bag does come with two universal wireless receiver pouches in case you prefer to put receivers on the outside. 

 

There is plenty of room for BDS, Camera hop TX, IFB transmitter, and other gak. There is a dedicated NP1 spot on the inside of the bag that is easy to get to as well. 

 

We have stock of the bags here in the US, so if there is ever an issue it is easy for me to deal with replacements. Our service is well known, so I'll let that speak for itself. 

 

In the end, an audio bag is a very personal choice. I am very proud of the Stingray...not just because of all the positive feedback we have received, but more because you aren't locked in to setting things up a certain way. It's flexible enough to allow you to set things up how you like them without being difficult for you. 

 

If you have any other questions, feel free to email me at dave@ktekbooms.com. Check out our facebook page, too. Loads of people have posted photos. Some really cool ones were uploaded over the past few days. 

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Was wondering if anyone had posted a side by side picture of the Orca OR-30 and Stingray for 633 bags next to each other for size comparison?  I searched around but wasn't able to find a picture.  Pardon if it has been posted as I may have missed it.

 

Thanks!

 

Hope this helps! 

 

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Quite informative, thanks all.

Question:

looking at various pictures on the web and these two videos, maybe someone could confirm that the access to the memory card on the Orca bag for a 633 is easy and that you don't have to pull the unit out from the top ? There seems to be quite a large border for the frame on top of the bag with side pannels unzipped...?

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Quite informative, thanks all.

Question:

looking at various pictures on the web and these two videos, maybe someone could confirm that the access to the memory card on the Orca bag for a 633 is easy and that you don't have to pull the unit out from the top ? There seems to be quite a large border for the frame on top of the bag with side pannels unzipped...?

 

Not that easy. As it stands there's not enough clearance to open the media door fully. You either have to set-up the lift for your 633 high enough or low enough so that it clears from the top frame. Either that, or as you said it, pull the unit from the top right side to create enough clearance to open the door.

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Not that easy. As it stands there's not enough clearance to open the media door fully. You either have to set-up the lift for your 633 high enough or low enough so that it clears from the top frame. Either that, or as you said it, pull the unit from the top right side to create enough clearance to open the door

The Stingray allows easy access to the media so you don't have to fiddle with your machine to get to it. People complained that the Petrol bags didn't allow access to media on the 664, so we made sure to get that right on the Stingray. 

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Not that easy. As it stands there's not enough clearance to open the media door fully. You either have to set-up the lift for your 633 high enough or low enough so that it clears from the top frame. Either that, or as you said it, pull the unit from the top right side to create enough clearance to open the door.

I found the same in my tests. Also access to the 633 rear batteries was not great. The openings didn't line up making it hard to connect and disconnect.

I found Ktek to be better in terms of access and space to maneuver your cables (and hands) inside the bag.

Cheers

Adam

Adam White | bloorstreetsound.com

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Building a rig into a Stingray bag is about as easy as it gets. Access is perfect.

 

I think it comes down to whether or not you're in love with having removeable side pouches like Petrol had and now Orca or if you can work with K-Teks front "lip" thing. Also if you can get used to having two deep side pockets (and internal pockets) vs. the traditional big front pocket.

 

Depends on how you carry your gear. For me, with the Stingray, I store 4x transmitters in the left pocket, A small plastic case full of lav accessories in the left inner pocket and a Countryman case in the right pocket full of lavs (it's almost like that pocket was made for a countryman case!) along with my pens, scissors, tweakers, etc.. That's really all I need. 

 

My only comment for K-Tek is they might try to improve the tool holding loops and give them a bottom somehow. The pocket is really deep and tools tend to fall right through the loop into the black abyss of that deep pocket. A little blue felt lining in there for visibility and extra padding would be a nice touch too. That's splitting hairs though.

 

I really like how solid the bag is. Very stable on any surface, retractable handles are genius, you'll love them every time you use them.. built in pocket to hold the rain cover out of the way is also great.

 

Good job K-Tek! 


PS.. the NP1 holder on the floor of the bag is perfect too!

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yeh the stingray is really cool with the front curve,  and space at the bottom for NP-1 batteries on the floor,   it's a real nugget of joy.  I do miss having a front zipper like the orca and petrol's,  but the front curved space at the front of the stingray is really really handy 

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It also conforms to your beer belly!

This was priority number one for me when we started the design. Seriously. I'm kinda rotund, so.....

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