Jump to content
Vincent R.

DIY battery eliminator for sennheiser G3/2

Recommended Posts

Putting together a DIY battery eliminator for a G2 TX I use in the bag for IFB. Core of it is a Swadj3 regulator, it can bring down up to 35v to the required 3v. The G2 uses les than a watt, and this device can give you up to 25 watt max, so you can use one of these things to power multiple sennheiser RX/TX, thus ruling out buying a couple of official Sennheiser eliminators ($69). The thingy goes for about $25. It's small enough to fit in the battery compartment of the G3/G2 by the way.

22fdaa8019e3a7bfed0de9e38948db2c.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love it - bought a similar one of these to power another 3v device - possibly a zoom for transcription? But never got around to it and later never use the zoom like i used to. Now you got me thinking outside of the zoom box what else i can use that little gadget on...

-Ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please let us know how it goes.

I used one of those same switching regulators on a mixer rig years ago to power a zoom h2 and it introduced a lot of noise into the audio on the zoom (not exactly a shocker given it was a $200 recorder).

I'm most interested in the physical construction you end up with.

Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hello everyone,
I'm an production sound mixer from Lithuania.
Maybe you will be interested, my DIY battery eliminator. Wireless - Sennheiser 2000, DIY plastic box-holder for receivers, two units NP1 battery, one - wireless, second - mixer. The sound bag - Petrol Pegz-2
(sorry my poor english)
Vidas
gallery_310_229_16359.jpg
gallery_310_229_291655.jpg

gallery_310_229_146242.jpg

gallery_310_229_252863.jpg

gallery_310_229_273056.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Vidas, looks good! Like the battery blocks! How did you make them? About the regulators: why you used 4? Are they low wattage rated? Basically I want to do about the same: I have to power a mixer (12v), Micron Tx (7.2v) and a G2 for iFB (3v). I will use Sony np-f batteries (7.2v), about 50 watt they are so swap at lunch and you are good. so I have to regulate the output for the mixer and IFB. Keep you guys posted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice work Vidman!

I personally don't see any need for G2/3 external power since 2.4 Ah (rechargeable) AAs run them for 12+ hours. However I only have four (100 series) and mostly use them for seconds and spares.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Hello everyone,
I'm an production sound mixer from Lithuania.
Maybe you will be interested, my DIY battery eliminator. Wireless - Sennheiser 2000, DIY plastic box-holder for receivers, two units NP1 battery, one - wireless, second - mixer. The sound bag - Petrol Pegz-2
(sorry my poor english)
Vidas
gallery_310_229_16359.jpg
gallery_310_229_291655.jpg

gallery_310_229_146242.jpg

gallery_310_229_252863.jpg

gallery_310_229_273056.jpg

gallery_310_229_79760.jpg

 

That's some damn fine looking work!  A tip of the hat to you sir.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This seems like the best place to post this little bit of show and tell! Recently finished making my first G3 battery eliminator for in-bag use. It uses three Traco TMR 1210 DC converters (isolated), and locking toggle switches, and locking DC plug/jacks; all protected by a 2.5A poly fuse. The belt clip comes from an old tape measure I had lying around. It was quite a tight fit and fiddly to get it all in the enclosure, but I'm quite happy with the results  ::)

 

post-8419-0-52682000-1431846378_thumb.jp

post-8419-0-19057100-1431846421_thumb.jp

post-8419-0-26106800-1431846468_thumb.jp

post-8419-0-50639400-1431846509_thumb.jp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really like the work on these battery eliminators. How did you construct the fake batteries that fit inside of the G3s? I understand the voltage regulators and wiring for the most part, but the issue of fitting the fake battery on the inside of the units are my biggest concerns.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I made some battery eliminators myself as well, I got empty AA placeholders from here:
https://www.fasttech.com/products/0/10001920/1171900

They are made like real battery shells, i.e. the tip is isolated from the shaft, but they have a spot welded lug connecting the shaft with the tip - they can very easily be opened with a rotary tool, just rip out the lug and connect your own wires. I was surprised how easy soldering was, i expected it to be aluminium that needs a little agressive flux and some effort, but standard electronic soldering tin stuck right away. I rubbed it in anyways just to be sure :)
You only need to work one, the second one can go in unmodified.

For the first one I made, I cut open and soldered two placeholders together, and put a DC buck converter and a linear voltage regulator in it. As I tested the second one without voltage regulator, it turned out that for what I do the twenty-something dB RF attenuation the voltage regulator adds is not as important as battery efficiency. So the approach of having 4 of what I guess vidman used: https://www.fasttech.com/products/0/10002934/1219200 is not as bad as it seems. They are cheap, but if you put more than 1A on them they get pretty hot. So if you have more than 500mA load, just add some more and they stay cool...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×