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Nagra Stories Sound-men won’t ever tell

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Nagra posted a series of YouTube videos about their recorders in its museum on their Facebook page. 

These videos seem to clear up some long unanswered questions.  

 

Here is the one on the famous Nagra SN stating Kennedy asked for it “for the US Army” but not released until the end of the 60’s

 

So - the end of the sixties means not in the sixties and certainly not in 1965...

In other words Dec1970 or 1971

 

Sounds like something you may have read before on

“Jwsound Nagra stories”.😎

 

 

 

 

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On 1/29/2015 at 2:22 AM, Jeff Wexler said:

I will be happy to get some stories together for you. In terms of what was used on any given movie, I can give you some guidelines: the first model of Nagra that was used on a motion picture would be the Nagra III (the Nagra I and II never made it to the movie world). The Nagra did come into general usage on feature films until around 1964. It is safe to say that any movie done from 1965 to 1989 would have used some model of Nagra. The year 1989 is significant because that was the year that I used a DAT machine to record production sound on a motion picture --- no one else had tried this relatively new format but I gave it a go on "The War of the Roses." Many, many movies were recorded using the Nagra well into the 1990s even as DAT became a very common format.

 

I owned and used just about every model of Nagra except for the Nagra I, II, and the Nagra-D. I owned a Nagra III, Nagra 4L, Nagra 4.2, Nagra SN, Nagra-IS, Nagra 4S, Nagra 4STC. Also used a Stellavox on 2 documentaries (but never owned one).

 

Hi Jeff!

 

I read this article of you because I also worked with a Nagra 4.2L when I started and I loved it.

So I started reading these posts here and found this info that, If I got it well, you were the first guy here to use a DAT recorder on a feature film back in 1989.

The interesting thing is that here in Brazil we started using DATs to record in the second semester of 1984!

There were six soundman - me included - from Rio de Janeiro that came to US in 1984 to shoot FIFA's Official Film of 1994 Soccer World Cup.

Before I came I sold my Nagra 4.2 to my assistant in Rio, and arranged with producers to arrive in LA a few days earlier to buy new equipment for this shoot. 

I went to Location Sound and bought with Jose Gonzales a PSC M4 mixer and a Sony TCD-D10 DAT recorder.

My colleagues also bought Sony's DATs, a bigger model, not the TCD-D10 one. 

I recorded the whole 1994 World Cup with this set up, and when we came back to Rio all of us kept using our super new DATs in docs and features!

But I never realized we did this some 4 or 5 years before you did it here! 

Interesting!

 

Tony Muricy

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Your recollection of the year 1984 and your use of DAT reorders must be in error. Quoting from Wikipedia: "Digital Audio Tape (DAT or R-DAT) is a signal recording and playback medium developed by Sony and introduced in 1987." I purchased my first DAT machine in late 1988. Every reference I have found states that DAT (actually, properly referred to as R-DAT) was first released by SONY in 1987. I suppose it is possible that a DAT machine was available in some other country outside the United States but I would be very surprised if it were back in 1984. My first DAT machine was a grey market SONY TCD-10 that had only just become available in Japan ---- the Owner's Manual was in Japanese.

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If not for his last sentence I would say Mr Muricy just made a mistake between using 1984 and 1994 as this first quote implies. 

Quote

There were six soundman - me included - from Rio de Janeiro that came to US in 1984 to shoot FIFA's Official Film of 1994 Soccer World Cup.

 

 

 so Mr Muricy  came to the US in 1984 to shoot … in 1994   Ok,  a clear mistake, but then he adds this last statement.

 

 

Quote

But I never realized we did this some 4 or 5 years before you did it here! 

 

I solved the great Nagra SN mystery, but this I have been stumped. 😎

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I hate to bring this up but Nagra showed a Nagra SNST-R in their latest video about their Nagra SN shown at the top of this page, the SNST-R was the last and most advanced Nagra SN that was released in 1999, 29 years after the first Nagra SN. 

If they are talking about the first Nagra SN released in 1970 why not show a 1970 Nagra SN. ( No Name, No silkscreening )  

Sorry,  I just want to keep the Nagra SN story correct.  

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 Maybe this will help explain the Nagra SN over the years.
 
 
The Nagra SN Series - from Prototype to Production, 1960 - 1970 to 1999
by
RJW
Size including controls - (WHL)  4 X 1 x 5 3/4 inches
Weight - 1.3 lbs 
Diameter reels - 2 5/8 inch
Tape width - 1/8 inch
Tape speed SNN 3 3/4 ips , SNS 15/16 , SNST 15/16 SNST-R 3 3/4 stereo
Battery life - 5.5 hours
 
 
The Nagra SN is one of the most well-known miniature covert recorders in history. Circa 1960, the first prototype SN was constructed by Stefan Kudelski, his company, Nagra Kudelski. Nagra started making tape recorders back in the early 50s. This miniature recorder was a very different project from his other larger portable recorders already in production. The SN prototype was one of a kind; no other units were ever produced. At the time, components for such a small, high-quality recorder were not reliable for what Kudelski had in mind. Further development of the prototype SN was put on hold for ten years. The actual production began in 1970, and the first units sold were in 1971. (15)
The SN was an enormous success throughout the world and used mostly by government agencies on both sides. Since the recorders were such expensive items, governments were just about the only ones who could afford them in any quantity. The small private investigator and others usually could not afford this type of recorder. Later sales expanded to law enforcement.
 
The SN became known as somewhat of a famous secret spy recorder with a mysterious past, never told in any detail. Stories were told throughout the years of a secret unknown spy recorder with early use by the U.S. Government throughout the 1960s. This has never been substantiated with any fact. The SN is a beautifully built machine, a small, thin, reliable, one channel miniature tape recorder. The rugged recorder chassis was milled out of a solid block of aluminum alloy and assembled with 7 miniature modular plug-in circuit boards and powered by just two penlight batteries for 5 1/2 hours of use. The Nagra SN miniature recorder was created to satisfy the requirements of covert recording during the 1970s. The SN became the machine of choice for many security agencies around the world. It was like no other miniature recorder the world has ever seen. The first units were painted with a flat gray paint with no Nagra name or any other markings on the recorder as most early covert spy recorders were nameless. When asked why the first SN did not carry the Nagra name, a spokesman for Nagra said it was due to the factory understanding of silk-screening.
 
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4IVvVkU.jpg
 
 
9hqBxh6.jpg
 
It wasn't until two years later in 1973 that the finish on the recorder started to change. That flat gray finish was now a smoother semi-gloss gray paint. The Nagra SN name was now beautifully silk screened in red lettering on the tape deck’s upper right-hand corner, with the operation and tape path instructions on the reel deck and lid.
 
78pZVYT.jpg
 
This new finish only lasted a short time before the finish changed again. No longer was the housing of the SN painted. Instead, Nagra utilized an anodized aluminum finish, topped with a thin undetectable hard protective transparent coating. These early finishes varied slightly in the aluminum color. Each SN was presented with the utmost attention to detail, from the highly mirror polished tape deck screws to a jeweled VU meter, the SN just screamed high quality.
 
6tjwVgs.jpg
 
Kudelski, the leading manufacturer of sound recorders for the movie industry during this time, also made it so the small SN, a capable body worn recorder, would be able to pick up the actor's voices more clearly and sync with the movie equipment, using the higher speed SNN. The SN was featured in numerous motion pictures both on-camera and as a production tool. The use of the cinema body recorder did not last too long, as wireless microphones became less expensive and better sounding and they replaced the need for the body recorder in motion pictures. The Nagra SN's primary use was always a covert tape recorder. In 1977, another significant SN development designed principally for covert operations was a slow speed, two-channel stereo model developed for the FBI called the SNST. This model was used for quite some time without any information about it released to the public. Only government agencies, not even law enforcement, knew of them at first.  The Nagra SNST miniature recorders were categorized by the U.S. Department of Justice to be Interception of Communication Devices (IOC). The IOC statutes make it illegal to own, use, train and/or educate non-law enforcement personnel to use this equipment.
 
Through the early 70s to 1999, there were four different models of the SNs. There may have been some insignificant custom versions since Kudelski worked with the individual customer's needs.
 
The four primary models are:
1970: Nagra SNN - Mono full-track recording (3.3/4 - 1 7/8 ips) 
1972: Nagra SNS - Mono half-track recording (1 7/8 ips - 15/16 ips) 
1977: Nagra SNST - Stereo version (1 7/8 ips - 15/16 ips)
1999: Nagra SNST-R - HiFi version of the SNST (3.3/4 ips)
 
All built with the same size/weight dimensions, etc., the only differences were in the circuitry of the different models. The Nagra SN series was extensively used by many countries all over the world since 1971. Today, accurate total production numbers are not known.
 
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3DzY89D.jpg

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Pretty stuff.  It's odd to be discussing DAT in this thread, as I don't believe there will ever be a "J Bond" for DAT recorders--if there was he or she would have a collection of ugly non-functional junk!   Collecting old kitchen blenders would be a more rewarding hobby!    If there were DATs around in 1984 I would have been all over them, but I'm pretty sure they weren't available anywhere then.  Portable digital audio recording at that time meant Sony F1-type interfaces recording onto VHS or Betamax decks.  Like Jeff I began see grey-market DATs in '88 or so.  At the 1988 New Music America Festival the house recordist for the New World Symphony was using a VERY expensive non-standard Sony portable DAT machine that I can't recall the name of--that was avail about a year or so before the D10 and the Aiwa "Strasser".  After that time DAT was adopted pretty quickly in the non-movie sound world, it took some time to convince motion picture post to change (as Jeff will attest).  And whether or not that all was really a good idea is a topic for another thread....   

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Well said, Philip! Although I am still proud of my history and being one of the first to use DAT in movie production, it's not a format I ever really liked. I was actually happier in the earliest days of DAT before the so-called "Pro" machines came along ---- even my HHB machine which I used for more movies than any of the others wasn't great compared to any of the Nagras. Don't get me started on Fostex, could get really ugly really fast. When the possibility of file-based recording arrived with the original Zaxcom Deva I, I was totally ready to abandon DAT!

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19 hours ago, Jeff Wexler said:

Well said, Philip! Although I am still proud of my history and being one of the first to use DAT in movie production, it's not a format I ever really liked. I was actually happier in the earliest days of DAT before the so-called "Pro" machines came along ---- even my HHB machine which I used for more movies than any of the others wasn't great compared to any of the Nagras. Don't get me started on Fostex, could get really ugly really fast. When the possibility of file-based recording arrived with the original Zaxcom Deva I, I was totally ready to abandon DAT!

Sorry for the thread diverge, but I agree, JW.  I had much better "luck" with the cheaper non-TC DATs as sort of "combat" recorders than I did with the pricey TC decks on dialog jobs.  For a few years I stuck with using a Nagra (Harveymod) for all the sync "talking" shots and a non-TC DAT (mostly Casio DA7s) for everything else.  The portability of the non-TC DATs really helped with the sort of culture-nature-10-mile-hike-uphill-with-gear docs I was doing then, and somehow those little machines more or less never failed in rain and heat and snow and desert and out on the water etc etc.  The tears were all around the easy stuff somehow: recorder on a cart recording actors!  Odd, weird, glad that's all way in the past.

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On 5/20/2018 at 1:19 PM, Jeff Wexler said:

Well said, Philip! Although I am still proud of my history and being one of the first to use DAT in movie production, it's not a format I ever really liked. I was actually happier in the earliest days of DAT before the so-called "Pro" machines came along ---- even my HHB machine which I used for more movies than any of the others wasn't great compared to any of the Nagras. Don't get me started on Fostex, could get really ugly really fast. When the possibility of file-based recording arrived with the original Zaxcom Deva I, I was totally ready to abandon DAT!

Hi Jeff,

When I made the switch to DAT, I went with the HHB.

Heard too many Stella and Fostex horror stories.

Gary used to boom for me and he told me about a horror day with you on top of a process trailer when you finally figured out the reason the Stella kept popping out of record was because the sun would hit a sensor inside the machine!

I chose Cantar when I went HD and was very happy.

Do you remember the Sony WM-D6 Pro with 60Hz sync?

I rigged 3 for John Glascock to be strapped on Arri SR's that would auto roll when the camera did for a doc he did on the Yangtze River in the 80's.

Cheers and thanks for your site.

Traut

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On 3/12/2018 at 5:04 PM, JBond said:

Thank you, daniel 
That's a great story and is just the kind of story I was looking for to be told when I started this thread back in January 2015.
I wanted it to be about untold stories using Nagra tape recorders in your profession that only soundmen knew about.
 The original title of this thread was Nagra Stories only soundmen can tell.

There were others on here that told stories over the last three years and I appreciated their stories also. 


Wow, so you were on the ship for a month? God, it seems so primitive using tape reels in your profession today. I can see you now hanging on and trying to change the reels on an SN. The locking reel hubs unlike a Nagra  III or IVS really need two hands as the reel lock would make it impossible to do one-handed so I can see you now trying to do that and keep yourself upright on a rolling ship.  I can also imagine how you must have felt not wanting to drop a reel to watch it roll down along the deck leaving a 50 ft tape trail behind,  especially with a crew as you explained that did not make you feel at all comfortable. 
You got the gig over a more experienced soundman, so I guess the pressure was on you to show your best.  I appreciate your taking the time to tell your story and hope it'll inspire others to tell theirs.  After all, when I started this thread I wanted it to be about Nagra stories that only a soundmen could tell.

It would've been nice if the guy had sold you the SN.  If I were you, I would look for an SN as you have a great memory to go with it.

 

I climbed up a rope ladder onto a ship underway with a 4.2 over my shoulder and a boom in my left hand.

It was even scarier descending!

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I went with HHB too, but the bitter truth about all those "pro" TC DAT machines was that the transports all came from the same two factories in Japan no matter what the nameplate on the outside said, and it was finally those transports that were "the problem".    I had a TCD5 with the 60 Hz mod (and its resolver) from Super 8 Sound.   It worked, as a plant recorder, a backup etc etc.  Those early non-TC DATs made them suddenly not worth the trouble...   Like I said--I will never understand how we were able to get away with doing so many horrible things to those early consumer non-TC DAT machines and they kept working, while their high-priced TC-capable cousins gave me so much trouble....

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