karlw

Lectrosonics Venue 2 Receiver Announced

29 posts in this topic

http://www.lectrosonics.com/US/lectrosonics-introduces-the-venue-2-six-channel-modular-receiver-featuring-iq-filtering-and-digital-hybrid-wireless-technology.html

New features include 75 MHz tuning (3 Lectrosonics blocks), Ethernet for control/programming/monitoring, IR sync, and iQ dynamic tracking filters, plus a few additional minor enhancements including a new high-resolution display and menu-selectable antenna power.

We plan to begin shipping them in November.

I'm happy to answer any questions!

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Is this backwards compatible with the 400 series transmitters or does it only work with the newer wide bandwidth (LT, LMb, etc.) transmitters?

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The Venue 2 is compatible with any 400 Series, 200 Series, or IFB systems, as well as a couple of other analog wireless systems.

Digital Hybrid mode is the "native" mode, i.e. no audio compandor, etc.

And the new, wide bandwidth (L Series, SSM) products are also likewise 100% compatible with anything else we've made in the past 15 years or so.

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The modules and frames between the Venue and Venue 2 series are not compatible.

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Dante is certainly under consideration. The reasons we did not include it in this version are: A) cost, because of the Brooklyn II card, which is really a 32in/32out unit, i.e. way overkill for a 6 channel receiver, 2) the internal space and support needed for such a card, and 3) the potential RF spray. We felt that all these things were strongly in favor of bypassing Dante in this round. That said, we do Have Dante input units like the DNTBOB88 and the DNT16i, and we will probably offer bundles with these units and the Venue 2 in the near future.

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#: 10   Posted (edited)

Are there any plans for an 8 channel version? Looks really cool. Might be something I'll get down the line.

Edited by BAB414

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#: 11   Posted (edited)

Hey Karl,

Would I be able to loop the antennas thru from a Venue 2 to a Venue if I were operating two Venues, a Venue 2 and a Venue 1?

 

Thanks,

 

Whit

Edited by Whit Norris
Grammar

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No plans at present to make an 8 channel version of this receiver, but we have heard your request and others like it, and we've got our thinking caps on.

Whit - yes, you can cascade these units either way, as long as the bandwidth and frequency range are the same. So, you could run antennas into a VRMWBL and then chain them down to a VRM2WBL. Or the other way around. Our rule of thumb is up to four Venue-type receivers can be run off a single pair of antennas. After four, then we suggest using an active splitter like the UMC16B.

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No, it is analog out only. The DSW system can do AES out if that is what you need.

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For anyone interested, we are now officially taking orders for the Venue 2 receiver as we have units on the shelf. Please contact your dealer for details.

Same goes for the new HHa wideband tuning handheld transmitter - and I know how much you guys love handheld transmitters... ;)

Cheers!

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Karl,

Can you explain the difference between the new IQ tracking filters and those found in the venue and UCR411a's?

Thanks

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Karl,

Can you explain the difference between the new IQ tracking filters and those found in the venue and UCR411a's?

Thanks

There's an explanation in the data sheet for the venue 2.

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The IQ filter stands for Intelligent Q.  The Q of the filter is the ratio of the filter depth divided by the filter bandwidth.  A Hi filter is very tight and low Q is very loose.  The IQ filter circuit analyzes the signal strength of the transmitter as it arrives at the antenna.  If you have a good strong signal, the receiver actually reduces sensitivity and tightens the filter (increasing Q) to make a very tight front end.  In doing so it is rejecting not only very close interference but some of the energy of the transmitter as well.  This can be a good thing.  For example, if you have a 1/4watt transmitter running and the scene starts in very close proximity to the antenna, you can run a risk of RF overload in the front end.  IQ filtering prevents that overload and makes the filter extremely tight.  Then, as your talent rides away on the chopper, the filter relaxes and the receiver sensitivity increases to capture as much transmitter RF as possible to keep range at its best. 

Now, envision a shoot on a very difficult set with lots of RF in the vicinity (the deck of an aircraft carrier on general quarters).  You can set all your transmitters to 1/4 watt for excellent capture and not worry about front end overload, even at close range - not only will you get good capture but you will also have very high rejection of the local interference sources that are slightly off frequency. 

IQ filtering is a dynamic, hands off automatic function based on signal strength - at its loosest, the filters are better than a VRS, nearly VRT like.  At its tightest, the Q exceeds any filters we have ever designed.  You can actually have the antenna of an SMQV at 1/4 watt nearly touching the Venue 2 receiver antenna with no overload. 

It's pretty cool - I think we finally found the correct ratio of Oreos, Twinkies and Coca Cola for the engineering staff - they did a great job on this.  

For those of you who wanted a Dante capability, we looked long and hard at that (as Dante license holders) but realized the added cost would be an extra burden on those wanted Venue 2 without Dante.  (We would have had to use the Brooklyn 2 chip set which is capable a 32X32 matrix.  Dante does not have an 8X8 or 6X6, just 32 X32 , 4X4 and 2X2).  So, for this Venue 2 introduction, you can buy a Venue 2 and if you want Dante capability, we are offering a DNTBOB88 8X8 unit at half cost complete with the required cables to integrate a Venue 2 into a Dante network.  This gives you the additional capability of the additional two input channels for other gear on the cart AND the 8 output channels -plus the flexibility to use it elsewhere.  The additional cost would be equivalent of integrating the Brooklyn 2 into the Venue 2.  But you get additional capability for your Dante based cart beyond just the Venue.

We recently signed up for the Dante 2X2 and 4X4 platform for future developments.

Gordon

 

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The IQ filter stands for Intelligent Q.  The Q of the filter is the ratio of the filter depth divided by the filter bandwidth.  A Hi filter is very tight and low Q is very loose.  The IQ filter circuit analyzes the signal strength of the transmitter as it arrives at the antenna.  If you have a good strong signal, the receiver actually reduces sensitivity and tightens the filter (increasing Q) to make a very tight front end.  In doing so it is rejecting not only very close interference but some of the energy of the transmitter as well.  This can be a good thing.  For example, if you have a 1/4watt transmitter running and the scene starts in very close proximity to the antenna, you can run a risk of RF overload in the front end.  IQ filtering prevents that overload and makes the filter extremely tight.  Then, as your talent rides away on the chopper, the filter relaxes and the receiver sensitivity increases to capture as much transmitter RF as possible to keep range at its best. 

Now, envision a shoot on a very difficult set with lots of RF in the vicinity (the deck of an aircraft carrier on general quarters).  You can set all your transmitters to 1/4 watt for excellent capture and not worry about front end overload, even at close range - not only will you get good capture but you will also have very high rejection of the local interference sources that are slightly off frequency. 

IQ filtering is a dynamic, hands off automatic function based on signal strength - at its loosest, the filters are better than a VRS, nearly VRT like.  At its tightest, the Q exceeds any filters we have ever designed.  You can actually have the antenna of an SMQV at 1/4 watt nearly touching the Venue 2 receiver antenna with no overload. 

It's pretty cool - I think we finally found the correct ratio of Oreos, Twinkies and Coca Cola for the engineering staff - they did a great job on this.  

For those of you who wanted a Dante capability, we looked long and hard at that (as Dante license holders) but realized the added cost would be an extra burden on those wanted Venue 2 without Dante.  (We would have had to use the Brooklyn 2 chip set which is capable a 32X32 matrix.  Dante does not have an 8X8 or 6X6, just 32 X32 , 4X4 and 2X2).  So, for this Venue 2 introduction, you can buy a Venue 2 and if you want Dante capability, we are offering a DNTBOB88 8X8 unit at half cost complete with the required cables to integrate a Venue 2 into a Dante network.  This gives you the additional capability of the additional two input channels for other gear on the cart AND the 8 output channels -plus the flexibility to use it elsewhere.  The additional cost would be equivalent of integrating the Brooklyn 2 into the Venue 2.  But you get additional capability for your Dante based cart beyond just the Venue.

We recently signed up for the Dante 2X2 and 4X4 platform for future developments.

Gordon

 

Gordan,

Thanks for the awesome response. I can't wait to try a Venue 2...It sounds like the new IQ filter is amazing and is going to really help in the coming years with increased frequency congestion.

Thanks

Ryan

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thanks for the explanation of IQ filter Mr Moore,sounds great.Looking forward to buying a Venue2 if there would ever be a field version in the future.

best

Cloud 

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Hey Karl,

 

Any reason not to plug an SRb directly into the RF outputs of the Venue2? How about a PSC RF SMA?

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32 minutes ago, BAB414 said:

Hey Karl,

 

Any reason not to plug an SRb directly into the RF outputs of the Venue2? How about a PSC RF SMA?

You can certainly take the RF outputs on a Venue or Venue 2 and connect them to the inputs on an SRb, given that the SRb is within the passband of the Venue frame (i.e. a widband "low" frame covers blocks 470 through 26). Same goes for PSC RF SMA multicoupler.

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The outputs of the Venue 1 & 2 are matched to within 0 to +1 dB of the antenna input port. As far as the signal that SRb or any other receiver sees, it is as if the receiver is hooked directly to the antenna. There is a slight noise increase in the RF signal (not audio) that is more theoretical than real. We've never seen any degradation in range or SNR.  In short, as Karl said, do it without any worries.

Best,
LEF

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