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Ben B

Rain Protection, salty water

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So i'm going on a shooting next month on the Mediterranean sea. Half of the film will take place on a very small boat on the sea (big enough to fit up to 4 people so you imagine a bit better what i'm talking about), the other half on a small island (might as well call it a big rock) and we'll be shooting always next to the water. Since it will be February it could be very windy, have a few waves and the air is filled with salt that goes everywhere.

My question is what would be the best protection i could get for my gear. I will have my Orca OR30 with my 633 and 2 UCR411 and a boom. I will also have my Pelicase to store the rest of my equipment but i need something for my bag. I've seen the K-Tek rain bib and it looks nice but i'm wondering if it will fit with my petrol bag harness (PS 605). Anyone have a better idea? Another product? A DIY solution?

Thanks!

Ben

 

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Try a Google search of the forum - there have been some good discussions on this.

I've been on some small ocean boats but only for a day or two.  I made Ziploc and gaff tape "cases" for my recorder, receivers, transmitters, etc.  Not pretty but effective.

The consensus here for really salty environments (i.e. surfing shows, etc) has been that you should try to get production to rent or buy you a kit for the show.  It's long enough that it'll be worth it to them and to you.  Salt water damage is insidious and irreversible.

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Thanks, will do!

It's a short film, 9 days of shooting, that means 4 on water and 5 on land. I'll try to have them rent a kit for me and in the meantime i'll experiment with ziploc bags!

Btw, the two UCR411 i'm bringing with, i bought them from you!

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As much of the following as you can get:

~ Rental gear.

~ A recorder that can be sealed in bag and operated from a tablet Eg. Zoom F8 (Ortlieb make some bags that could be good for this).

~ A quick way to remove the kit from your person (in case you go overboard).

~ Spray the Rycote with water repellent.

~ Wireless boom will save you from breaking into sealed recorder bag with a XLR cable (you may have to for headphones).

~ Don't bother with umbilical.

~ Some fresh water to wash things down before you open them up Eg. the Aquapacs you put the TX (if they are getting wet with sea water).

~ The longest lasting batteries you can get - to reduce the amount of times you open things up.

I was filming a salvage operation in the med maybe 10 years ago in October until the weather got too bad Eg. force 9, waves breaking over the entire 30 metre survey ship and sloshing up and down interior corridors. I was not totally convinced of the 'Health and Safety' practice on board and elected not to follow the camera operator down the ramp with the sound kit - on that occasion nothing happened but he did suffer a career changing injury while on board (and we weren't even filming). A boat big enough for only 4 people will be quite an 'experience' (something akin to what 1000s of Syrian refugees are going through) - my point being don't let anyone talk you into something stupid.

 

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Ah, now i see the project is a narrative (not a doc) some of my earlier post may not apply. You'll probably be in shore when you can and have a support vessel and crew?

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It is narrative and we'll have a second boat for the crew and camera. I'll probably be on the boat with the actors booming from under since there will be a lot of wide shots with dialogue.

I just received pictures of the new boat and it looks bigger with higher sides. That makes it a bit less wobbly and protect better from the waves. It also has a closed front part much more protected from the splashes. It looks a bit like the boat in "The life of Pi" but smaller. So nobody's going into the water unless accident.

I noted all your advices ans check with production what we can do.

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I did a shoot on a five day backcountry canoe trip a couple years ago, and got the NRS access duffel dry bag. My whole rig drops right in, it has a clear top, and when it's buttoned up tight, it could survive going overboard. It's also great for loading in on rainy days. Check out 

nrs.com

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I always try to have a big plastic bag withe me as a back up. Big enough to put the mixer and boom mic in all together.

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I sit my kit in a drybag, it's worked for the last 20 years.. best to take your kit with you and try a few out if you can, you'll get a feel for what works or won't.

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I have the pre merger Petrol poncho. Not pretty, but can save gear. It doesn't really breathe well, and some rain drops can obscure view of equipment. Has saved me many times in the rain.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1115084-REG/sachtler_sn606_rain_poncho.html

Transparent plastic garbage bags have also worked.

Poncho is my go to in rain. Keeps me and gear dry.

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Great advice guys

Yes a Drybag or a large Pelican for when things get too rough or re-locating.

 

I bought an American made "Sound Slicker " for shooting at the Vic Falls in Zambia

It was the dry season so I had this picture taken with the make-up woman pouring her water bottle over me!

Oh well publicity!!!! No, not for the KKK

 

mike

Sound Slicker.jpg

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I just wrapped a feature shot in Montana winter, 30 days of all exteriors.  Usually I was working from my cart covered with a popup and plastic when necessary but there were days when the location was so remote I had to walk in with my bag.  The rain man poncho that Eric mentioned above (I bought 2 when they were having a sale, switching brand from from Petrol to Sachtler) saved my gear from the elements.  It does not breathe well, as stated above, but it kept everything dry and safe.

snow.jpg

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I just wrapped the shooting on the sea. We shot 4 days on a small boat on the sea with harsh weather conditions, lots of winds (up to 70-90 km/h) and around 2m high swell with lots of splashes. The other 5 days we shot on the coast line, either right next to the sea (splashes again...) or on a small peak where the strong wind made everything fly away (dust, sand, etc...).

I used the rain bib to cover my or30 and had my pelicase to carry all the extra gear. It work perfectly. The rain bib kept my bag safe and dry and my pelicase as well. I cleaned my cables, my windjammer and my boom every night with a wet cloth to take the salt off and dried it.

Thanks for all your advises and hopefully this post will serve someone else.

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