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Michael Miramontes

When do you stop recording?

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Once the director has cut the program, you should cut. If the talent understand that the program is over, then continuing to roll either picture or sound IMO violates an implied understanding that whatever is heard or seen afterward is considered private. In very rare situations I've had directors ask the crew to keep rolling (easier to do in a sat truck or control room than a set), but at that point I consider that it's the director's responsibility for any and all consequences, good or bad.

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I cut when the camera cuts.  I can usually tell when they do because I have monitors.  If they have wires on and the director has not cut but runs in to give them direction I pull the wires down.  Wires are only up when acting or rehearsing.

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In a narrative situation, I am with Mirror. There is an expectation of privacy except when in front of camera for rehearsal or shooting. I cut when camera cuts. Exceptions are possible (like in cars or on very long lenses or very wide shots, where I might leave up lavs or plants for communication purposes, but I always tell the actors. If I am on a show that "keeps rolling" as actors come and go, I also tell actors that even when not being broadcast to headphones, if the camera is rolling they are being recorded and the track exists (although likely never listened to).

In a "real life" situation, as described by the OP, there is NO expectation of privacy. These public figures ought to know better, and in some cases probably do. These "leaks" cannot all be accidental. Same with any kind of multiple camera, follow me around, look at me journalism or reality-style entertainment. If cameras follow you around, then watch what you say.

Although I wouldn't record or monitor a lav behind closed doors in places without cameras, most radio mics are not encrypted, and these public figures ought to know better than to say things they shouldn't while wearing a radio mic. 

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1)  It sounds like the mic doing the recording is not actually attached to either of them, so this might have nothing to do with the sound team.

2)  Live TV is not controlled like the narrative stuff most of the folks on this board work on.

3)  Spies?

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In a sit down interview Many experienced directors when working with real people know they can get their best stuff when the on camera person thinks we are finished shooting.  The 50-50 situation.  

 

 I will not cut till I know the camera cuts and I will not move the boom or unwire somebody till it is absolutely clear that the on camera subject is ready to get up.  

 

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In a sit down interview Many experienced directors when working with real people know they can get their best stuff when the on camera person thinks we are finished shooting.  The 50-50 situation.  

 

 I will not cut till I know the camera cuts and I will not move the boom or unwire somebody till it is absolutely clear that the on camera subject is ready to get up.  

 

Same

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I'll stop pressing the record button when I die. Oh, sorry you meant on a particular job? My bad! Haha ;-)

Channeling my inner Senator: it depends. Particularly on the kind of job. If it's scripted: they yell cut, I cut. Rarely ever an exception.

If it is unscripted, it is something I discuss with the director, field producer, etc; but most likely you're always rolling. On reality, sometimes on corporate, but almost always on documentary, they like to keep me rolling constantly, and only when all cameras are down, and for a while (like lunch breaks or something of the sorts), can I really cut. But I also have to be ready to roll on a moment's notice, because the subject may start doing something worth capturing.

So yeah, it depends.

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Same as Mirror and Robert as far as waiting for the camera to cut. I'm not sure if it matters as much in the digital file world, but it was better for the transfer house at one point if sound cut after camera (or at least someone told me that once). But there are enough times when a "cut" turns into a "keep it rolling" that I'll not only wait till the camera cuts, but I'll ask my boom ops to tell the AC's when they've just left the camera rolling by accident. 

As far as mics being broadcast - only when the actors are on set. Sometimes I only bring them up once action is called. Car scenes can be a little different. We'll let the actors know the mic is open, partly so the director can hear them and they don't need to fiddle with a walkie talkie. 

Josh

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Recently, the reverse has become an issue: no less than a dozen "client producers" parading dozens of talent thru BTS, PR, and Social Media interviews. As the clock has gotten tight, scrum and rumbling between producers led to producers demanding to roll before talent was even in the chair. We picked up talent still talking to various handlers, pre-interview stuff, and more than a few personal admissions. The producers also hid the early commands for roll, keeping talent ignorant.

Pre-roll ethics, seems to me, should be the same as post-cut ethics.

best

 

PS And I agree with Sharman about this one issue; no presidential candidate in 2016 "accidentally" speaks into a live mic. Its a manufactured "leak".

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For drama work continue recording after "cut" and there may be a moment of clean atmos that

the dialogue editor can use to help the cut transition to the next shot.

You have to train your boom op to be aware of this!

mike

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It depends. Nowdays you work with bunch of unexperienced people who never let you know if they are rolling.

I roll the transmitters almost at all times and cut the bag recorder and turn down faders.

After wrap If they need the "missed sound" I charge another 1-2 hours to convert it.

But also I teach people to turn off the transmitter. Then if they don't turn it off it is on them. This  is why I think SMQVs are not good for reality /unscripted and make people uncomfortable. There was this one show that I worked on with bunch of "married" women where I just emailed the SLEEP RM mp3 to one of the talent because the producers were taking advantage of a horrible situation which the talent did not want to be used.

At the end of the day if something gets recorded it is our fault. So I am firm with producers about talent being aware of being recorded. 

P.S. BTW When I worked with Bill Clinton maybe 8 years ago he turned off an SMQV by himself. SO this one is on him.

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Lots of actors may not know the button pushes to turn of an SM series TX, but most of them know how to disconnect the mic, and do that.  I don't like it but they like having the control.

 

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<the producers were taking advantage>

Usual behavior from that species? :)

GREAT on you to get your talent to switch off their tx. SUPERB. GREAT job.

I salute you Rado... 

-vin

 

12 hours ago, mikewest said:

For drama work continue recording after "cut" and there may be a moment of clean atmos that

the dialogue editor can use to help the cut transition to the next shot.

You have to train your boom op to be aware of this!

mike

WOW! Mike, that seems like it is from another era! NOBODY stays quiet after CUT nowadays. 

On the contrary, when the call for sound happens, i roll immediately, and my boom ops have deployed, mics in place, and then i delay as much as i can to shout out "speed". this way i get at least a few seconds on every take with the booms in place.... 

warmest regards

-vin

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On April 3, 2016 at 10:01 AM, RadoStefanov said:

After wrap If they need the "missed sound" I charge another 1-2 hours to convert it.

...

There was this one show that I worked on with bunch of "married" women where I just emailed the SLEEP RM mp3 to one of the talent because the producers were taking advantage of a horrible situation which the talent did not want to be used.

Good for you, Rado. Youre obviously blessed. If I tried either of these choices, I'd get fried.

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