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I recently purchased the Mackie 1620i. I plug it into my Mac Mini and when I plug in a mic I can hear a doubling effect on any input I use. How do I stop this. I had not have this happen using my alesis mixer. It's like my audio is looping through the mixer. Also I I push the solo buttons the effect is no longer heard. What do I need to do to correct this issue?

 

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It sounds like you are hearing both your mix on the mixer itself and a loop back from BR.  Can you unassign the return from the FW port from your headphone mix (on Mackie usually in the master section on the right side of the mixer)? 

mack.jpg

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Thanks guys. That FW button was the issue. I was looking all over the board and could not figure out what I was missing. It's a new board and it all comes down to operator error. I guess I will go through a couple of test projects to  ensure I am secure with all of the I/O before taking this out on a paid gig. Thanks again.

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The mixer itself is great. I am only using it for the Boom Recorder application, so it's purpose is more than sufficient. However I would have liked the mixer to have at least 8 direct outputs so that I can run a parallel recording deck as well. I am able to send channels out through the sends, a total of 4 sends. Also the lack of having the ability to mix via the faders is a little bit of a let down, (i may be doing something wrong, but it is pretty straight forward). When mixing and recording to BR I have to adjust the volume through the gain pots instead of the track faders. The mixer is more designed for studio DAWs and live sound mixing for small venues. It really isn't designed for production sound for film and video.

I can figure out ways around the setup for the parallel mix via patchbay and y-splitters. I would have to mix through the Mackie for BR and via my iPad for the zoom F8. But I want to keep it as simple as possible and mix through 1 unit. 

With that being said, the trade offs the good out ways the bad as far as I am concerned I have 16 channels I can record as opposed to having 8 that I previously had. I have extremely quiet preamps than the preamps on the alesis multimix firewire 8. It was an okay mixer and it had limitations that were obvious in channels, xlr inputs, preamps, and a few other issues. Overall the money I spent of the Mackie wasn't wasted. It will serve me well enough until I am able to step up to something more suited for film and video production.

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I may have missed something here, but my Onyx 1620 has direct (pre-fader) analog outputs via DB25 [Tascam] multi-pin connectors on the back panel... in addition to the optional FW card

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The 1620 does indeed, but Mackie left it off of the 1620i for whatever reason. It kinda sucks that I didn't go for the 1620 instead, but I would have had to purchase the FireWire card separate. I probably could have found the together on eBay. Maybe not in as nice condition this mixer is. But it would have been better to have

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The mixer itself is great. I am only using it for the Boom Recorder application, so it's purpose is more than sufficient. However I would have liked the mixer to have at least 8 direct outputs so that I can run a parallel recording deck as well. I am able to send channels out through the sends, a total of 4 sends. Also the lack of having the ability to mix via the faders is a little bit of a let down, (i may be doing something wrong, but it is pretty straight forward). When mixing and recording to BR I have to adjust the volume through the gain pots instead of the track faders. The mixer is more designed for studio DAWs and live sound mixing for small venues. It really isn't designed for production sound for film and video.
I can figure out ways around the setup for the parallel mix via patchbay and y-splitters. I would have to mix through the Mackie for BR and via my iPad for the zoom F8. But I want to keep it as simple as possible and mix through 1 unit. 
With that being said, the trade offs the good out ways the bad as far as I am concerned I have 16 channels I can record as opposed to having 8 that I previously had. I have extremely quiet preamps than the preamps on the alesis multimix firewire 8. It was an okay mixer and it had limitations that were obvious in channels, xlr inputs, preamps, and a few other issues. Overall the money I spent of the Mackie wasn't wasted. It will serve me well enough until I am able to step up to something more suited for film and video production.


Cedric, there's no reason why you shouldn't mix with the faders. Please check the manual again - you're probably missing a step somewhere.
As far as connecting your F8, don't use the four aux outs. That's not what they're for. Use the 1/4" ports underneath the inserts. They're labeled as stereo pairs, but that doesn't matter.

Good luck,
BK


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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millar   

I had a major issue with the 1220i board and boom recorder a few years back to do with it not having a great clock and not accepting word clock. I was backing up a two track mix to a 744t (which was my TC master) and recording the mix + iso's on boom recorder as my master that I delivered to post. On long takes (15 + minutes) it was drifting out of sync from the camera while my 744t stayed in sync, I cant remember now if it was under sampling or over sampling but either way, it was not running at 48k. With a low accuracy clock and not slaving to external word clock it was a bit of a disaster. Also, Mackie is terrible about updating their firmware to allow OS updates on your computer.

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Yeah--that's the knock on all the cheap digital consoles: no ext clock.  Short takes (like most of what would happen in a dramatic shoot), ok; long takes (like reality or concert or talk-show) not good.   Understanding the limitations of your gear in relation to what you are asking of it is important.....

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On 11/7/2016 at 6:38 AM, Blas Kisic said:

 


Cedric, there's no reason why you shouldn't mix with the faders. Please check the manual again - you're probably missing a step somewhere.
As far as connecting your F8, don't use the four aux outs. That's not what they're for. Use the 1/4" ports underneath the inserts. They're labeled as stereo pairs, but that doesn't matter.

Good luck,
BK


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Thanks. I will take another look at using the faders to control the mix in Boom Recorder again. Someone else pointed out the inserts to go into the F8. It had been so long since I used a console that I had completely forgotten about using them in that way. Thank you all again for the response.

On 11/7/2016 at 6:38 AM, Blas Kisic said:

 

 

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