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Rachel Cameron

Audio Root Distro to DNS-2: DC cable gauge

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I'm building a right angle DC cable that goes from my Audio Root distro to my Cedar DNS-2. The wall wart that shipped with the DNS-2 was built with 22AWG.

In the wall wart graveyard, I found some 24AWG and some 18AWG, but no 22AWG. In a quick search of the site here, I found advice regarding 22-24 being fine..but my question is: Could I make this DC cable build a bit sturdier? I was wondering if it was okay to do the build with the 18AWG.

Any advice for my build here?

Thanks for any help,

Rachel

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Anyone else use mic cable for DC? Canare non-starquad fits a Hirose perfectly. I don't like piling up heat shrink on skinny lamp cord type wire. Not sure why.

 

i just trim away the braid and leave it unconnected. 

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2 hours ago, Jack Norflus said:

Faster electrons will make the DNS process faster

I hope the electrons slow down a little bit for the curves, though.

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4 hours ago, Jack Norflus said:

Faster electrons will make the DNS process faster

Man speaks the truth. That's why you use time code so everything will be in sync.

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10 hours ago, Derek H said:

Anyone else use mic cable for DC? Canare non-starquad fits a Hirose perfectly. I don't like piling up heat shrink on skinny lamp cord type wire. Not sure why.

 

i just trim away the braid and leave it unconnected. 

I have

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Closure. Looks a bit rough, but I took the liberty of clipping the 1 and 4 solder cups flush and stuck soldered the ends down inside. I pulled 2 and 3 completely, since they were only vestiges from a previous life. I trimmed the little nylon wall between them. Hot melt glue and a razor. The cable is mighty burly for bag work now. 22-24 ga. was wimpy. I can sleep now. 

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

Edited by Rachel Cameron
Added better pic, phrasing clarification

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Very true, Vin. But since it didn't matter...inside a busy bag, it'll just last longer. I've had wall warts with 24ga. coming out of them. I always think it's scary thin, and then they eventually break under heavy use, or fray. But this one's tough as nails. I love my sturdy cable.

And I got permission from the wiring lords here, anyway.

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Most of the devices we use draw very little current, and therefore the voltage drop over short runs is of little consequence, which means that using small gauge cable is fine for that application.

However -- Even in a bag, and especially on a cart, using heavier gauge cable will result in less issues with ground loops.

 

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Rachel, sounds like you didn't solder the conductors to the XLR-4 pins? You clipped the pins flush and just pushed them in? I'm confused by why you wouldn't just solder to the pins. Is it because the conductor was too fat to fit in the cup?

 

John, how does having heavier gauge DC power cables result in less ground loop issues? I thought ground loops were more about electrical path and having more than one 'ground'.

 

Thanks,

Derek

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So sorry. I wrote too quickly. I soldered them in. Was a bit tricky with no solder cups. I used the needle tip that came with my Weller solder station.

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4 hours ago, Derek H said:

John, how does having heavier gauge DC power cables result in less ground loop issues? I thought ground loops were more about electrical path and having more than one 'ground'.

All wire has resistance.  That resistance causes voltage drop.  Ground loops are about the different ground potential between circuits. 

Yes, if there is only one path to ground, then you don't have different potentials to ground (or between gear).  

However, each piece of gear needs a path to ground or you don't have a completed circuit.  In most cases that path to ground is via connecting cables.  The lower the resistance of those cables, the less difference in potential between grounds.

Note that ground potential isn't just about ground loops causing hum, it also figures into RF susceptibility.

 

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