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Sennheiser MKH 70 Vs MKH 8070

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Does anyone have actual on set experience with both mics ?
Cons and pros based on their experience ??
It's kind of a rarity to find any users having experience in both mics and it looks like the 8070 hasn't managed to gather the niche film mixers that were fond of the 70.
I 've heard A/B tests of both and have a fair amount of experience with the 70 but not the 8070.
Even though the 8070 looks better on specs, I have to admit that I like the characteristics of the 70 over the 8070.
Best
FF

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JonG   

I've used both and really like the sound quality and directivity of the 8070, however the 70 is a go to for me on a lot of ENG things where reach is important. If I were matching the 8070 up with other Sennheiser 80xx mics or even Scoeps mics in a narrative scenario I'd consider it a good fit. I've also done plenty of work matching up the 50 with the 70 and they work great together. 

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Hi Jon, any particular reason on why you would reach out for the 70 versus the 8070 other than reach ?
Checking the specs of both mics, even though the 8070 seems like an improved version of the 70 on paper, it is almost double in weight and even though the diameter is thinner it is indeed a longer mic than the 70.
I am also wondering as to why the 70 is still over 30% more expensive than the 8070.
What I am particularly interested in, is low frequency and standing waves handling from the capsule and interference tube it self ( not operator handling and rumble ), where I remember the 70 being superior to the 8070 on the aspect of early reflections in the low mid and low
frequencies but its been some time since I had the chance to audition an A/B .
Would you be able to check out both mics in a big reflective space and specifically on mid and low end reflections ?
It is very difficult to find a professional having both mics in his artillery.
Thank you for getting back to the thread, the silence was deafening !
 

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JonG   

I don't own both mics unfortunately, but I have used both. Like I said before, I find that the 8070 has a clear cinematic sound for good detailed recording. It is almost musical. I own the Neumann KRM 82i and I would compare the 8070 to that mic, which I use mainly on features and narrative projects. 

The mkh70 is lighter than the 8070, robust, and a real workhorse. It has a deep rich resonance just like the mkh50, but somehow psychology it makes me think of an RE20 or SM7b, which is probably why I tend to use it in more run n' gun type situations. That said, I still use my trusty mkh815T for things that require extreme reach, like sporting events and plays. 

For your purposes, it sounds like the 70 is what you are looking for. Deep bassy warm resonance, with less sensitivity in the handling noise dept. You can find mkh70 and blimp packages for good prices in the consignment sections of nearly all the usual suspects, so I'd recommend looking there if budget is an issue. I hate to say it but I've purchased all my long shotguns used because you tend to get them for nearly half price and a blimp system thrown in for free. The trick is getting a good blimp that isn't beat up, some blimps are no longer made so buying a new one can be real pricey. Also know that buying a used mic can mean that it will require servicing. While both the 8070 and mkh70 are still in production and still being serviced, the 815T is not. 

I purchased my mkh70 for an amazing price, but soon needed to buy a new windjammer (which had to be old stock of an obsolete model), then soon after that I had to replace the entire blimp. THEN the mic needed servicing, so all in all I spent just as much as getting everything new. On the flip side, my 82i and 815T have not as of yet needed servicing or repairs for the mics or the blimps, so that has been money well saved. 

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The 8070 is more along the lines of the 816. It has improved noise figures and a cleaner (though still very dark) off-axis response, but it has about the same very strong directivity and reach that the 816 has. 816 has weaker bass at the same distance, it can sound a little thin. 8070 sounds very natural to my ears. I use 816s regularly on outdoor shoots, and would use an 8070 very much the same way.

The 70 is a completely different beast. While having a clean off-axis response too, it has the same rich "radio voice" type bass response and treble crispiness that the MKH 50, 60, and 30 have. This is not always what I'm after. I've used a 70 outdoors too, but usually it stays in the car and comes out for large indoor locations such as churches or warehouses - where I need something more directional than a short gun or hyper but without the strong room coloration of the 816/8070 variety.

 

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Thanks for getting back to me Jon and Pkautzsch
Jon, I am more inclined towards the 70 as it is a mic that I 've used for many production days and very I am happy with the way it sounds when used on the hands of someone that is aware of the mic's idiosyncrasies.
Price is not a real concern as the few times I tried to buy at a lesser standard that what I usually do, I had to pay for the real staff afterwards and deal with the issue of the lesser product, thus making the "cheap" option actually an expensive one as I had to add it to the real product + inherit the problem the cheap one left behind. I 've bought all my mics new as they are such a crucial part of our work and it was never easy or without a lot of patience and perseverance. It makes someone wonder though, why a design that must be over 30 years old now is more than 1/3 of the price of the latest and greatest which must not be more than 10 years old.
Pkautzsch, could you please define the rich "radio voice" technically ? I just don't get exactly what you mean.
I am primarily interested in the use of the 70 indoors, as I 've heard how great it deals with hard reflections and there is always the possibility to have some parts of a wide shot with the 70. Post will most possibly grab the wireless tracks if they will use any wide production tracks but to my ears the area where the 70 is superior is in large reflective interiors. Why would you go for the 70 versus the 8070 in this case ( I get that you are talking about colouration but could you break it down a bit more ) ?
I am not familiar with the 30 , 50 and 60 range even though I grew up with the 416.
I was talking to Rycote recently and they are not recommending the Large Cyclone for the 70. The dimensions of the mic can make it fit physically in the Cyclone but even with the really stiff Lyres and 4 in total ( I proposed that ), there are still strong chances that the mic will act in a floppy manner especially on sudden swings.
Having to use the mic ( 70 or 8070 ) in an old school windjammer is something I would really not like to do, I know that it will work and it has done so for many many years but I really want to avoid reverting to the old school Rycotes as I am not a fan of their long tubular shape.
I will need to buy 2 mics so such an investment on mics which are not really used that much anymore is making me think hard on other
possibilities.
Being aware of the SuperCmits and the dedicated capsule they have just for room colouration is great but the noise floor of the Supers make them a no go for fast paced TV shows where post will not have time to curve out the high pitched characteristics of the Super and the tracks could turn out to be more of a problem than a solution.
Hmmmm, choices, choices - I 'll give it a few more thoughts, still have a few weeks to decide which solution will be the most suitable.

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JonG   

The MKH20-70 all have a "deep rich bassy" sound as well as crisp highs. Like a radio voice. You really can't get more descriptive than that. I suppose you'd really need to compare mics to understand. The MKh416 is not the same family as the MKH70. It is more closely related to the MKH80xx family like mentioned above. 

If you are buying two mics and have a 416 (as everyone should), I'd go with an mkh50 and mkh70 since you seem to be inclined towards that series. They sound good and sound alike. 

You do not need a blimp of any kind if you are shooting indoors, so just get a foam windscreen and save on weight. You can use common sense here. 

Outdoors the 70 shines very well. I use mine is a traditional Rycote blimp which is light weight and works very well. I'm not a fan of cyclones, and I do not believe that they make one for long shotguns anyways. 

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Derek H   

Jon, good point about used gear and needing service. I've definitely bought a few used items that ended up needing service. Would have been less expensive to buy new. 

 

Of course, the same can happen with new gear. My CS3e which I bought new had to go in for service when it developed a rattle. Luckily it wasn't expensive. 

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On 2/26/2017 at 6:17 AM, JonG said:

The MKH20-70 all have a "deep rich bassy" sound as well as crisp highs. Like a radio voice. You really can't get more descriptive than that. I suppose you'd really need to compare mics to understand. The MKh416 is not the same family as the MKH70. It is more closely related to the MKH80xx family like mentioned above. 

If you are buying two mics and have a 416 (as everyone should), I'd go with an mkh50 and mkh70 since you seem to be inclined towards that series. They sound good and sound alike. 

You do not need a blimp of any kind if you are shooting indoors, so just get a foam windscreen and save on weight. You can use common sense here. 

Outdoors the 70 shines very well. I use mine is a traditional Rycote blimp which is light weight and works very well. I'm not a fan of cyclones, and I do not believe that they make one for long shotguns anyways. 

Thanks for clarifying Jon, much appreciated.
I do not have a 416 btw but love the Cs3e sound and I am very well aware of the MKH70 as I was booming with it for a fair amount of
production days.
There is no Cyclone for the 70 series ( including the 8070 ) as the trend for shotguns is moving towards more compact mics without the need of the long interference tube which made the more old school directional mics so special.
Thanks for the time and attention to my post

FF

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VAS   

MKH 70 and MKH 50 is my favorite microphones. With thoose two microphones in your kit; you covered all your needs. MKH 60 is a perfect for television related programs due too the very well mid-range frequencies. I learned to boom with MKH 70 and it doesn't sound so "long shotgun" to my ears. Maybe I am wrong. One negative about MKH 70 or MKH 8070 is the little options about windshields. The original one from Sennheiser is too heavy. I haven't tried from Rycote, but will be better in terms of weight.

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