giraffe

What does a sound mixer do?

9 posts in this topic

Not to be confused with the other thread below, asked by someone who knows entirely more then I do.

 

How much "mixing" is actually going on?

I assume that everything that can reasonably be, is being multitracked at that point, to be mixed later.

Or is it more just babysitting wireless and keeping an eye on things, and maybe riding the levels?

 

I know this question is *completely ridiculous* to all of you, but I really just don't know.

Thanks again.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Hi Giraffe,

There are probably many topics already on this forum that explain.

The term sound mixer stems from the days of 1 or 2 track recording required microphones to be mixed

to produce a finished or near finished result.

This required rehearsals, a script (that actors kept to) and a great deal of skill and judgement.

With the arrival of multi-track recorders, yes, individual microphone sources can be captured but

usually a mix is required for a director and others to hear all the dialogue and to provide the editor

with a guide also. Currently this guide is commonly fed to camera so that the picture files have audio.

That's about it.

mike

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The job title is sometimes listed as "Sound Recordist"

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I made a docu series for ERT.
12 episodes, 45min each.
Mix Track & ISO's from my side.
Note to post production (mostly non sound editors) to use Mix Track (ISO's only for phase issues).
After watching 4 episodes on air so far; I notice (and confirmed) 95% was my Mix Track.

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Nice job, VAS. I'm sure my mix track is never used. I still try for it anyway.

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8 hours ago, Rachel Cameron said:

Nice job, VAS. I'm sure my mix track is never used. I still try for it anyway.

Gaining experience about "what pass through air and what not".
I still hear my mistakes, but that's why they pay me; to mix and not to mix.
I wish if we had a proper sound editorial team, but...

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post will definitely build a mix, or at least reserve the right to. sometimes they use your mix.  but a mix is still essential on set for comteks and video village.  many who are listening don't really get the difference between monitoring and what is being recorded, and don't know about building a mix from your ISO's vs the mix on set.  Also, in their defense, they want to get lost in the moment and watch the performance, and good audio ie the best mix you can on set is a huge part of that. 

 

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10 hours ago, davidtirolo said:

post will definitely build a mix, or at least reserve the right to. sometimes they use your mix.  but a mix is still essential on set for comteks and video village.  many who are listening don't really get the difference between monitoring and what is being recorded, and don't know about building a mix from your ISO's vs the mix on set.  Also, in their defense, they want to get lost in the moment and watch the performance, and good audio ie the best mix you can on set is a huge part of that. 

 

When I started, it was boom and a lav. One sit down interview after another, followed by run-n-gun broll. For years. Audio importance rather nominal on the b-roll. Ambi/atmos. I never tried for a mix as it was not necessary. Then my jobs started changing..

Good points David. +1

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I think we are now pressured by smaller budgets, less time and multiple cameras,

video shooting (no structure and rolling for ages "keep rolling and let's pick it up from....."

Additionally less patience for rehearsals, "DP says why don't we shoot it!"

All this would not have worked well when we were mixing multiple sources to a mono recorder!

mike

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