Bogdan

Travelling kit for ambient recording (silent source)

111 posts in this topic

15 hours ago, tomsalyer said:

I've been making field recordings in very quiet Florida swamps and forests with a simple rig that's about in your budget range: a Sound Devices MixPre-D, small with terrific preamps, an Audio Technica AT4025 x\y stereo mic, compact and rugged, Rycote Baby Ball wind protection, and tiny Sony M10 recorder. It

Finally a sample!! :) Thank you Tom. I was actually considering the 4025. I like the recording!

There is one thing about it though. I hear this consistent low frequency hum, similar to traffic in the distance. Many nature recordings have this background hum. What is it and where does it coming from? 

And these frogs are very high frequency :)) I am more familiar with those low frequency frogs :P.

 

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18 hours ago, Bogdan said:

Not sure if you're asking me, but I'll definitely monitor my sound until I feel it's not needed anymore.

I've considered these long time ago. I will get a pair of capsules and make them myself. I own a gas soldering iron...very portable. I think it's a must have for anybody travelling. I repaired many broken cables...especially for my headphones.

One technical question though... These capsules, by default require PIP (Plug-in power). How can you power a PIP mic from a recorder like SD..or Sonosax..or F4..or D701? without going into Macgyver mode of DIY conversion to XLR?...Its optimal power is 9v.

I was passing by and reading this thread and thought I would let you know that the Zoom F4 and F8 support plugin power. I've never used plugin power on my F8's, but you could research it further if you're interested. You can read how to enable it in the manuals.

I have four Zoom F8's and one Sound Devices 633. I find myself using the F8's more than the 633 these days. I did have to send one F8 back due to a display issue. That problem was found only on some very early copies below a certain serial number. Zoom replaced the unit at no cost. When the display went out, however, the unit still functioned correctly. 

I also had to send my Sound Devices unit back due to power issues that caused the unit to shut down unexpectedly. They checked it out and couldn't replicate the problem, so they sent it back and I wrote it off as a fluke. A while after I got it back it failed in the middle of a classical music program and material was lost. That sucked. The second time they simply replaced the unit. My suspicions are it was a power or power switching issue. The new SD unit has operated as expected, as have all my F8's.

One thing you may want to consider is that the F8 is more power efficient. It can run for longer periods of time on the same power source. It also has 8 internal AA's instead of 6 on the SD. 

Lastly, I did purchase the F4 to check it out when it was just released. I didn't like the software/hardware interaction as much and I particularly didn't like the display, so I returned it and bought the fourth F8 instead. Just my 2 cents.

Good luck with your endeavor!

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2 hours ago, scottie1001 said:

I was passing by and reading this thread and thought I would let you know that the Zoom F4 and F8 support plugin power. I've never used plugin power on my F8's, but you could research it further if you're interested. You can read how to enable it in the manuals.

Thanks, that's good to know! I checked the manual. It doesn't really say what's the actual power and I have no idea if there is a standard in this case.  Most handheld recorders have 5v PIP.  But the optimal power would be 9v for EM172 capsules for example.  

I'm considering a surround setup using a crazy DPA + EM172 setup :))

Ohh and now I see this is your first post. Thanks for stopping by!

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11 hours ago, Bogdan said:

There is one thing about it though. I hear this consistent low frequency hum, similar to traffic in the distance. Many nature recordings have this background hum. What is it and where does it coming from?

Yep, that's what it usually is. machinery/vehicle/city noise.

You need to get a very long way, 10+ km's or more from a major highway at least.

I do a lot of nature recording in my spare time, my location work covers the costs so I can go bush for a week at a time..

Grant.

btw, check out Bernie Krause's books for a few tips.

http://www.wildsanctuary.com/BookPage_Page_1.pdf

Recording notes: Neumann RSM191/Sennheiser 40/30 mics , SQN4s mixer , Oade "super mod" Marantz pmd620/Nagra SD recorders (through the SQN). LPF @80hz, single takes/no layering. Often several days & multiple trips to get up to 10 mins of uninterupted audio. My aim is to present soundscapes of locations that anyone can visit, you don't need to hike for hours to get to these places.  

 

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12 hours ago, engaudio said:

Yep, that's what it usually is. machinery/vehicle/city noise.

You need to get a very long way, 10+ km's or more from a major highway at least.

I do a lot of nature recording in my spare time, my location work covers the costs so I can go bush for a week at a time..

Thanks Grant for your input! Very useful.

I see you use the M/S MKH 30/40. How did you decide to use this setup?

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

At the moment I'm investigating what setup I prefer for my travels. I'm considering all options until I discover what my ears like to hear... ORTF, M/S, X/Y   ...

So far MKH 8040 MKH 30/40/50 and Schoeps mics seem to be mentioned alot.

Does anybody know a good place to check comparative outdoors samples of these different setups?

Any resources/opinions/experience welcome!!

 

So far, it's obvious to me that each setup is useful in different situations. I would probably like to own 3 main mics (excluding DPA lavalier mics). I would probably use 2 at a time for stereo. The 3rd one I would use to change the setup and for more flexibility.

So basically 1 shotgun - 1 figure of 8 and then an additional superhypercardio :))

 

As I mentioned in the first post I already have a NTG3. But I see it's not very popular in stereo ambient recordings.

I'm considering to sell it for a higher range mic (more frequency response). I saw what can be achieved in post when recording above 20khz.

 

As a personal preference I would love a more bassy mic to use for my voice from time to time and for more bassy sounds (like the rumbles of a volcano). MKH 50 seems to do a good job for that?

 I most likely wont record birds that much...

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33 minutes ago, Bogdan said:

So far MKH 8040 MKH 30/40/50 and Schoeps mics seem to be mentioned alot.

because they are some of the best mics for quiet sounds. for the Schoeps you'll need good preamps if noise floor is your focus. I could hear a clear difference between a MKH50 and a MK41 even on Sound Devives preamps on really high gain.

33 minutes ago, Bogdan said:

Does anybody know a good place to check comparative outdoors samples of these different setups?

Any resources/opinions/experience welcome!!

I'm as guilty of trying to research things online as anybody, but at some point you'll just have to start experimenting yourself. rent/borrow a few setups for three days and you'll know much more then three weeks of clicking through the interwebs.

 

33 minutes ago, Bogdan said:

As a personal preference I would love a more bassy mic to use for my voice from time to time and for more bassy sounds (like the rumbles of a volcano).  MKH 50 seems to do a good job for that?

the MKH50 is great to get some punch behind voices (as is the MKH416), if you really want to get very low frequency rumble then the 8040/8050/8060 would likely be the better choice. also makes it quite tricky to avoid handling noise in run and gun though.

I've also discovered that an MD421 makes my voice sound really deep and smooth, if I'd ever had to do a radio show that's what I'd use. 

chris

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4 hours ago, Bogdan said:

So far MKH 8040 MKH 30/40/50 and Schoeps mics seem to be mentioned alot.

 

That's really because JW group is focused on film and broadcast sound. It's the tools we use. Ask nature recordists and they may well say (eg) MKH 20 / 8020s (or other omnis). For dialogues, apart from shotguns of various types, the tools of our trade are essentially the Schoeps MK41 and the Sennheiser MKH50, and for those recording MS they'll probably reach for fig 8 (and perhaps cardioid) mics from the same manufacturers. Because the quality is up with the best and in the case of Sennheiser are considered bulletproof in adverse conditions (heat and moisture).

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4 hours ago, Bogdan said:

I would probably like to own 3 main mics (excluding DPA lavalier mics). I would probably use 2 at a time for stereo. The 3rd one I would use to change the setup and for more flexibility.

So basically 1 shotgun - 1 figure of 8 and then an additional superhypercardio :))

(snip) ... stereo ambient recordings.

(snip again)

As a personal preference I would love a more bassy mic to use for my voice from time to time and for more bassy sounds (like the rumbles of a volcano). MKH 50 seems to do a good job for that?

 I most likely wont record birds that much...

A shotgun, hyper and fig 8 is an excellent basic kit for recording MS dialogue based stuff (a documentary for instance) but you're limited immediately to MS or mono - ie a million miles from "stereo ambient recordings" (save MS ones) or super quiet nature type sounds that I believe was the original intention on post number one.

Assuming you're aiming for 2 channel stereo in general (very many of us were only aiming for 2- rather than 3- or 4-channel, or b-format because for many years multichannel recorders were rare or expensive outside studios) I would think a pair of cardioids would be a starting point, then learn what you can do with this basic kit. If you're sure you want to experiment with mid-side, get an 8 in addition. The 'budget' is already increasing ... I agree with Chris once again - start learning by doing. I don't think you need to outlay so much to start recording. Putting the mic in the right place is far more important than anything, knowing how the tools are responding to the subject and the environment, etc.

For instance, the 'bassy-ness' of a hyper is due to proximity effect (and this is even more pronounced on a fig 8, which have been used for decades in radio studios for this reason). You will not get close to a volcano. If you did, a hydrophone might be a better choice to tackle the sulphurous gasses. An omni (without built in roll off like the cheap lav capsules mentioned earlier) would be the right choice to capture the bass.

Jez

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Quoting Grant (re Bernie Krause book):

Cheers Grant, I will have a look at this. I was actually wondering if there were any decent books on nature recording (as opposed to film or music or sfx etc). Not that I'm particularly looking but for the sake of perhaps pointing out fairly obvious things which we may not immediately think of (electricity for instance). I realised that the only book (out of tons of stuff going back to the 1920s) that I had along these lines was the 1970s Wildlife Sound Recording by John B Fisher. That really only comes off the shelf when I need to read the excellent chapter on parabolas, although coming from a birdwatcher it's a decent (albeit of its time) guide for wildlife (and insect) recording. I have come across far more online - nature sounds.org (from memory ... not a link) is probably a good resource and starting point.

Pertaining to the art of 2-channel recording in general I guide many to Michael Williams' The Stereophonic Zoom, available through the rycote website, which explains recording angles based on pickup patterns which many take for granted (ORTF, IRT for instance).

But I mean to ask here if anyone else has either links to or names of reading material which would be of interest to Bogdan and the rest of us, please chime in. Thanks again Grant!

Jez

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12 hours ago, chrismedr said:

I'm as guilty of trying to research things online as anybody, but at some point you'll just have to start experimenting yourself. rent/borrow a few setups for three days and you'll know much more then three weeks of clicking through the interwebs.

chris

Cheers Chris! I just want to narrow down a few mics, so that I don't borrow all the mics in the world :)

8 hours ago, The Immoral Mr Teas said:

A shotgun, hyper and fig 8 is an excellent basic kit for recording MS dialogue based stuff (a documentary for instance) but you're limited immediately to MS or mono - ie a million miles from "stereo ambient recordings" (save MS ones) or super quiet nature type sounds that I believe was the original intention on post number one.

Thanks again Jez! I think you "get" me.  Not sure I understand the first paragraph 100% though :)). The way I understand it, you're suggesting M/S is not really a good choice for nature recording as a basic kit at the beginning. It makes sense. And yes ..."super quiet nature type sounds" is my intention here. 

On a daily basis, I definitely don't want to record what most people record...birds..meadows...rivers...waves...traffic...fire. I've already done that. Nonetheless, I will have a go at them, from time to time, with my new kit. Instead I would love to find unique isolated sounds... and from my experience silent environments are an amazing source of mysterious sounds. They are much better defined. 

8 hours ago, The Immoral Mr Teas said:

Assuming you're aiming for 2 channel stereo in general (very many of us were only aiming for 2- rather than 3- or 4-channel, or b-format because for many years multichannel recorders were rare or expensive outside studios) I would think a pair of cardioids would be a starting point, then learn what you can do with this basic kit. If you're sure you want to experiment with mid-side, get an 8 in addition.

For instance, the 'bassy-ness' of a hyper is due to proximity effect (and this is even more pronounced on a fig 8, which have been used for decades in radio studios for this reason). You will not get close to a volcano. If you did, a hydrophone might be a better choice to tackle the sulphurous gasses. An omni (without built in roll off like the cheap lav capsules mentioned earlier) would be the right choice to capture the bass.

I will record two channels 95% of the time. 

Aside from DPA mics what other mics (to capture great bassss) would you recommend ? (the question is not just for you Jez :P)

The MKH 20/8020 you "almost" recommended look like very interesting option actually. 10Hz at the bottom range seems amazing.

I have no idea who are most of the people who recommend mics on this forum, but I hope the topic is clearly focused on nature/ambient/sound effects, rather than film type dialogue. I will use these mics for voice as well, but what I mostly want to capture are sounds that I can transform into sound effects, music and/or attach them to my video projects.

Basically I would love to combine and alter natural sounds (or man made) into musical tracks. This is why I need diversity, low noise, high dynamic rage/frequency response. The documentaries I'll create will have a very organic approach, especially from the sound point of view...if you ignore my artificial DAW post-processing  :D.

Thanks to the suggestions of some users here and my own research, I decided to put the budget mindset aside and firstly discover what would be the most suitable starting kit for my travels (2 main caridiods + 1 omni). At least this is what makes sense now. I don't want to have more microphones than I need at first. 2 channels is enough, until I get into the game. I will most likely sell my NTG3 for more cash.

I am looking for bulletproof (heat/moisture) low noise mics, with good dynamic range/frequency response .  At the moment I am looking at the MKH 30/40/50 and the MKH 8000 series. 

 

P.S. I realise the title of this topic was poorly chosen. Also, this topic is an easy google find. I didn't anticipate the discussion will get here... I would gladly take the zoom f4 from it if I could. Too much advertising for it and not sure it will even be my choice :))

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Once more I'd like to direct you towards large diaphragm condenser mics. I know for many applications they may not the natural choice, but in your case they could be perfect:

They have less self-noise than any small diaphragm condenser

They have a very good low end

Many have switchable polar patterns, so you can choose the right one in the right conditions

There are digital versions available, like the Neumann TLM-103D, so the whole preamp discussion becomes obsolete. The only noisefloor of interest wil be that of your mic

LDCs will provide a unique sound in your particular circumstances, making your recordings unique and perhaps special, and so on.

 

Yes, they may be less robust and wind protection can be tricky, but not impossible to solve and you'll know right from the start that your recordings will be different from others, and thus you may be able to sell them better later

 

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1 hour ago, Bogdan said:

Cheers Chris! I just want to narrow down a few mics, so that I don't borrow all the mics in the world :)

I understand that, and this discussion certainly has some merit.

But as you see, some people feel that M/S is poor for stereo atmos while others love it, some people advise you to go with large diaphragm mics while others recommend small condenser and others still lavs, some tell you to take a pocket recorder and focus on the scenery etc...

All good advice, and all of these methods could result in great recordings. But since you seem to have a strong focus on audio character and quality, eventually you'll have to just try what fits your taste.

I do agree with people saying that mic placement will probably have the biggest impact though. Imagine you'll record a in the woods at night, a MKH40/30 in your basket will sound very similar to a MK41/MK8 in your basket, while two 4060 hanging from branches several meters apart will sound completely different.

The problem of the noise floor on the other hand is easily solvable by throwing money at it (or by recording louder sounds : )

 

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12 hours ago, Constantin said:

Once more I'd like to direct you towards large diaphragm condenser mics....

There are digital versions available, like the Neumann TLM-103D, so the whole preamp discussion becomes obsolete. The only noisefloor of interest wil be that of your mic.

LDCs will provide a unique sound in your particular circumstances, making your recordings unique and perhaps special, and so on.

I actually love this "revolutionary" LDC approach. The first time you suggested it, I was too absorbed in the recorder discussion.

I considered conventional LDCs some time ago, then disregarded them when I realised how sensitive to humidity/heat they are. They tend to become noisy in those situations I've heard. Many people regretted bringing them in humid/warm environments.

So, one aspect I would need to investigate is how to protect them from heat+humidity as I plan to travel in warm+wet countries more often than not.  I'm sure there are some very "thin".. low handling noise...waterproof covers which can ...cover... the microphone with minimal sound alteration...In fact, for bright mics, these layers can help "dampen" the sound a bit. If anybody knows some elegant heatproof/waterproof solutions please shout! Maybe aluminium foil....:D. And then there is the handling noise aspect to consider.

I don't mind the extra effort in experimenting with LDCs, as long as I find a solution without too many compromises.

I've seen some people record nature with a pair of NT1A mics. There's a nice youtube video with a guy creating a very portable solution. They are too bright for me though.... and I think I'd like to invest in something I can play around with a bit more.

But digital LDCs change everything....I am definitely investigating the Neumann TLM-103D and similar. AES 42 looks a bit scary though...

Multi pattern LDC mics seem ideal to me. However, as I said, I need to find a 'bulletproof protective case' solution. I'd love a low noise multi pattern mic.  NT2A looks like the entry level...but it's a HUUGE mic and probably very limited.

12 hours ago, chrismedr said:

But as you see, some people feel that M/S is poor for stereo atmos while others love it, some people advise you to go with large diaphragm mics while others recommend small condenser and others still lavs, some tell you to take a pocket recorder and focus on the scenery etc...

Your POV is extremely valuable! And I also 100% agree that the placement of the mics will play a MAJOR part. I don't take it for granted. Yet, this truth is valid for any mic and it will be my playground. So I need to check what mics I could use first... 

Just like testing microphones, at the moment I am testing ideas. At first I had doubts. I thought this topic may confuse me more than help me. But, in fact, it only brings my indecisions to the surface. I was hoping for samples and for people to share their work, but so far there are only 1 or 2 brave heroes showing off :) 

Now I see how different everybody's ideas are. Some are conservative...others are more "revolutionary". Some ideas are closer to my heart than others. At the end of the day I will try the setups which resonate the most with my instinct. I am sure other people who are in a similar position and are reading this thread will take something completely different out of it.

At first, I was reading threads about ambient recording without replying. Most of them were repeating a MKH/SD...mantra (among others). After becoming familiar with more possibilities, I decided to write my own topic, as I realised most topics were not "touching the unknown".

There is nothing wrong with the "tested by many with solid results" suggestions. They are necessary to create professional results! Yet my personality asks for the exploration of the untested. Before I go in this adventure, I need to know the limitations of the tools I choose and how to use them creatively.

I believe creativity is a "must" even when choosing a working tool. It also requires courage and perseverance. Whenever I repair my bike, I try to do it without the conventional tools (because I don't have them :P). Yesterday I repaired my chain without a chain tool. The satisfaction was intense...

So bring more creative ideas to the table!! It's also required to understand what are the mic setups that proved to be successful for travelling and nature recording. All ideas are useful, as not everybody wants to risk...

.----------.

P.S. If it's "legal" to change the name of a thread, I'd kindly ask a moderator to remove the Zoom F4 from the title, as this thread is obviously not just about that.

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3 hours ago, Bogdan said:

There is nothing wrong with the "tested by many with solid results" suggestions. They are necessary to create professional results! Yet my personality asks for the exploration of the untested. Before I go in this adventure, I need to know the limitations of the tools I choose and how to use them creatively.

I believe creativity is a "must" even when choosing a working tool. [...]

So bring more creative ideas to the table!! 

as said, it's certainly fun to discuss ideas with other fellows but frankly: 

On one hand you want recommendation of what has worked for others and on the other you say you want to explore the untested - bit of a contradiction to me : )

so go and explore! (and be sure to report back and post samples for those of us who like tested with solid results : )

chris

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I have just recently taken out my Zoom F4 and Audio Technica BP4029 MS stereo mic for some recordings.

Heres a link to my site where I've blogged about it and have some recording samples!

https://jasonpinchessound.wordpress.com/2017/04/10/catching-waves-in-devon/

I don't have a SD to give a comparison but I thought you may want to give this a listen. 

This was my first time using the F4 out in the field. I'm usually a post-production guy but have been wanting to venture into the field recording world. I spent about 2 months searching the web for advice and forums comparing the gear that I had on my wish list and ended up with this rig. I am so happy with it! I have a relatively lightweight compact set up that I can capture quality and totally usable recordings. Plus, I'm about £2000 better off!

 

Bear in mind these recording were my first. On reflection, the recordings are a little hot (although good for you to hear how it performs with high gain). I did not use the digital limiter at all and the recordings have not been processed in any way (except to decode the MS to stereo).

I only used the MS setting on the mic so I still have the option of having the clean mono mid mic if I want.

Any feedback or thoughts on the stereo image of the Audio Technica BP4029 are welcome!

Jason

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1 hour ago, chrismedr said:

as said, it's certainly fun to discuss ideas with other fellows but frankly: 

On one hand you want recommendation of what has worked for others and on the other you say you want to explore the untested - bit of a contradiction to me : )

so go and explore! (and be sure to report back and post samples for those of us who like tested with solid results : )

chris

I can see the contradiction :) Yet, Constantine recommended something I haven't heard before in field recording...digital LDC. Or at least it is not tested very much for sure..if at all. Even though I would need to scratch my ears with one hand to record the AES 42 signal...without being surrounded by converter boxes....it certainly opened up a new portal. This portal bumped me into "audio-over-IP"..."Dante"..."Ravenna" topics....

People with far more experience in sound recording than I have can come up with untested solutions (on paper at least). That's what I meant. 

Some people stop at the first mic recommendation...I need to squeeze the lemon :)

This is your playground as much as it's mine...

What I am actually going to test...I still don't know. I hope more people will chip in new ideas. Possibilities are endless...

57 minutes ago, jasonpinches said:

I have just recently taken out my Zoom F4 and Audio Technica BP4029 MS stereo mic for some recordings.

Welcome Jason! I'll have a listen later on. This is what I am looking for! Thanks!

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56 minutes ago, Bogdan said:

Possibilities are endless...

Yes, exactly. This is the problem I'm finding with this thread: we could go on for ever making recommendations, but without one fairly vital piece of information, that of your actual budget, most of it will be a total waste of time. We've gone from just over £1,000 for all the kit, to the realms of £3,000 for a pair of Neumann LDC digital mics and the associated DMI-2 controller and another couple of grand for a recorder that takes AES in to go with it.

Decide on a budget, research the kit that you can afford within your budget and then rent to see what works for you. Don't forget to factor in windshields, cables, power-supplies, a stand or boom pole, headphones, and a bag along with everything else.  Go back and look at your original plan and work on that premise. Otherwise, you'll spend forever getting recommendations for kit and no time at all actually getting out and recording.

For further reading, the Bernie Krause books are excellent: you could also look at Cathy Lane & Angus Carlyle's 'In The Field - The Art of Field Recording' and on a rather more esoteric level, another collection of essays and interviews called 'Autumn Leaves - Sound and the Environment in Artistic Practice' edited by Angus Carlyle.

 

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20 hours ago, soundmanjohn said:

Yes, exactly. This is the problem I'm finding with this thread.

Decide on a budget, research the kit that you can afford within your budget and then rent to see what works for you.

Ha, John... your comment is almost a thread killer. For me knowledge and brainstorming is not a waste of time. I even received some thanks messages for creating  this thread. You could have at least recommended a mic or two...and maybe argument your choice (except your awesome DPA review :P). I will test the DPAs and compare them with some other omni mic as soon as I decide which one.

As I said, I left my budget mindset at the door. I've learned a lot since I started this thread...I adapted to new possibilities.

At the moment I am looking for 2 professional mics as a basic kit. I've already explained what I want to achieve. I expect them to cost up to 2k...preferably in the realms of 1.5k. But budget is relative at the moment. If I can invest in two amazing mics that give me enough flexibility for some years to come, then I would have no problem extending my budget. 

So far I haven't been recommended an awful lot of microphones. In fact, clear recommendations (with arguments or samples) came from people who are not even active users here. 

22 hours ago, jasonpinches said:

I have just recently taken out my Zoom F4 and Audio Technica BP4029 MS stereo mic for some recordings.

I've had a listen Jason. Very brave to share your raw recordings :)). Not sure what to say, except I wish you recorded more quiet sources. But it feels this mic is a bit noisy for what I want to achieve. I think the waves overwhelmed the mic too. And I liked the stereo sound of the motorbike, even though I can hear you cranked the gain a bit. But for the price and 2 in 1 mic, it feels like a good choice.

I look forward to hearing some more!!! I think your simple setup has a lot of potential in the right context.

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Wel, if you read the beginning of the article, it does mention what else I mostly use for recording when I'm not using the Soundfield, which is a M/S pair using MKH30/40 in a Rycote windshield. I thoroughly recommend that set up for low noise and portability. You can find them used within your budget from various places. Replacing the MKH40 with an MKH50 or a 20 would give you more options but push your budget through the roof, but we've been there before, I think.

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5 minutes ago, soundmanjohn said:

Wel, if you read the beginning of the article, it does mention what else I mostly use for recording when I'm not using the Soundfield, which is a M/S pair using MKH30/40 in a Rycote windshield. I thoroughly recommend that set up for low noise and portability. You can find them used within your budget from various places. Replacing the MKH40 with an MKH50 or a 20 would give you more options but push your budget through the roof, but we've been there before, I think.

Yup, I remember something about "Nagra" Falls :) I will definitely test them; it's a fact. Also the 8000 series I suppose. I have a friend of a friend who has them. When I do, I'd also like to compare them with minimum two other sets. I don't want to rush. 

I'm tempted to compare their sound with the 'unrecommended for outdoors' LDCs.  I will go in the woods, nearby Edinburgh. There's also a cave nearby...

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23 hours ago, jasonpinches said:

I have just recently taken out my Zoom F4 and Audio Technica BP4029 MS stereo mic for some recordings.

Any feedback or thoughts on the stereo image of the Audio Technica BP4029 are welcome!

Jason

Nice takes Jason

I really like my AT BP4029 MS too, it's a great MS mic for an awesome price.

I use it on doco & run and gun :)

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2 hours ago, Bogdan said:

I'm tempted to compare their sound with the 'unrecommended for outdoors' LDCs.

Unless there's no wind at all, you may have problems. Foam windshields are fine in a studio, but nothing beats a properly designed basket-windshield when you're outdoors.

 

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