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M Sisco

Ambient/Denecke timecode disparity

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The Denecke TS-2 that we rented for our production, set at 23.97fps, runs slower than the Ambient timeclock on my Sound Devices 744T, set at the same rate.  Neither is in drop frame.  Any suggestions to correct this without buying lock-its?

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Lock it’s will not correct your slate error unless you propose to feed it to the slate

The 744 should be stable, mine has been rock solid for eight years!

If the slates a rental switch it out

 

 

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

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All Denecke time code products are also world famous for rock solid accuracy. I'm sure you've triple checked all settings, but it sounds like one of them is wrong.

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 I agree with ed white.   In the almost 25 years I have been doing this Denecke products are absolutely the most reliable thing I have ever used. 

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Seconding Ed and Coleman, it sounds like something may be off in your settings?

 

Also, about how long does it take for the drift to become noticeable? Was either device accidentally powered off for any period of time?

 

And, yeah, if it's a rental switch it out, and if the issue persists then at least you've isolated the issue to your 744T.

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All TC clocks can be calibrated one way or another.  Ambient made this possible to do in the field with their master unit, Denecke can cal their equipment in their shop, as can other techs....

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How much drift over how long?

 

I could be wrong, but If I recall correctly, the original TS-2 slates didn't have 23.976, and was available later as an upgrade, which became standard on all TS-2s. Standby for a correction if I'm wrong.  Anyway, if you can see the drift after 20 minutes, then it's probably not a calibration issue, but a setting issue.

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2 hours ago, Glen Trew said:

How much drift over how long?

 

I could be wrong, but If I recall correctly, the original TS-2 slates didn't have 23.976, and was available later as an upgrade, which became standard on all TS-2s. Standby for a correction if I'm wrong.  Anyway, if you can see the drift after 20 minutes, then it's probably not a calibration issue, but a setting issue.

Very true, and often small drifts can only be seen by taking a picture of the display--the numbers are churning too fast to see much of anything under a second or so.

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6 hours ago, Glen Trew said:

How much drift over how long?

 

I could be wrong, but If I recall correctly, the original TS-2 slates didn't have 23.976, and was available later as an upgrade, which became standard on all TS-2s. Standby for a correction if I'm wrong.  Anyway, if you can see the drift after 20 minutes, then it's probably not a calibration issue, but a setting issue.

Yes, that's what I've come to believe the issue is.  There is no setting on the Denecke jog wheel for 23.98 or 29.97.  Just the round numbers, which would account for the amount of drift occurring. We assumed when it arrived that 24 meant 23.98, but obviously not. 

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Denecke has always had efficient abbreviations. For 23.976, they simply use "23", which is definitely not 24. However, the TS-2 always had 29.97. In a pinch, you can set your slate to 29.97, as at least there wouldn't be any drift. It would be spot on at the beginning of each second.

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On 10/20/2017 at 2:18 PM, Ed White said:

All Denecke time code products are also world famous for rock solid accuracy. I'm sure you've triple checked all settings, but it sounds like one of them is wrong.

I've had two Denecke TS 2s that would not stay together.  Time healed all wounds.  Today are solid.

 

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