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Glen Trew

Boom and Live Vocals. Good lesson from 1955.

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Today I saw this 1955 TV production of Tennessee Earnie Ford because one of the kids is a friend of mine. One thing that stands out to me is that it serves as a good reminder about how simpler is often better, especially when the goal is to capture the essence of a music performance and entertainment, and the impromptu life the happens during it. Live on-camera vocals picked up with an overhead boom mic, no earwigs, no wireless mics, no body mics, no hand mics in anyone's face, no prerecord, live orchestra off-stage, live background vocals off-stage around a single mic. Yes, there is noticeable system noise from the early recording technology, and it was mixed live to a single track with no edits. But I dare say that the subtle nuances still come through better than most performances would today with 24bit and a hard drive full of tracks. Something to ponder.

 

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37 minutes ago, Christian Spaeth said:

Amazing performance! Here's a voice with technique, one can tell. Unfortunately this is no longer the standard with actors...

 

Such a voice was not standard with actors then, either, but the recording technique was standard, and should still be. I've worked with many actors who are great singers, but they are so accustomed to the pre-record lip sync method that they believe there is no other way, as do many mixers.

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What a great performance and reminder of what's possible when you keep it simple and have great talent.  Love the little boy getting into it and then being calmed down with just a gentle touch on the neck from Ernie, and the complete natural reaction to the performance.

 

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Yep you can't beat live!

Live versus say a CD/studio recording shows you that adrenaline gives a sparkle to a performance.

In the early days if digital classical music recordings it was found that orchestras were too relaxed

as they knew that editing was possible so they did not play with concert intensity.

 

I worked on many musical TV shows in the late 60's and boom operated on well known singers.

Music played at a controlled level was either pre-recorded or even fed "live" from our band room.

I've operated a fold back speaker many times (on wheels) so you got as close to the singer as

possible, but it was sometimes a battle when the singer wanted more level and the sound mixer

wanted less level and therefore less colouration.

Oh well those were the days!

 

mike

 

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I saw this video yesterday, quickly. Let me remind those very nice colors and atmos. What a sound and emotion. Did you use a 24 tracks recorder ? Thank you for this work Glen. Crazy,  you do not seem that old...

Philippe 

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