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I ended up cutting off a bit more than half of the curly cord. It really helped clean up my bag not having 5 feet of headphone cable dangling from me. I think the 3.5mm female jack on the ear cup is cool, but I wouldn't use it. I don't see any advantage, other than being able to use any aux cable as your headphone input. 

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On all my 7506 cans (which I don't use much any more) I eliminated the straight section leading from the curly to the headphones -- that helps tame the excess immensely. 

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For my customers who are tired of the ever stretching coil cable on the 7506, I replace the entire cable with a 4' straight section terminated with a 3.5mm TRS. 4' is perfect for bag use as it allows cable freedom as the average length reaches from your ears to your knees. PITA coil cable problem solved. 

 

 

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I had the jack installed on my 7506s. I love it. It’s nice to keep the cable with my bag but be able to store the headphones spereatly. Plus, it allows for versatility with any length or any cable.

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I still like the 7506s....  and don't mind the cable as is...  never had any problems with it....  Cart it's no issue and out of the bag, I tuck in the unused cable into bottom of my bag and never have a problem with it.

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I usually throw the excess coil over my back when in a bag.  I applaud those of you brave enough to try and fix those cables--there is really hardly any copper in them to solder at all.  For years I did a Toline mod to mine, using Beyer straight cables, but then got lazy and just use them as is.  I see them as an expendable--they all bust eventually.

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I've done this, non-invasive and reversible mod, to all my coiled cable headphones.

It's not a great video, but the technique works quite well, once you get the hang of it. It takes about five or so minutes.

It pretty much eliminates the straight section of a headphone's coiled cable.

If you don't like the solution, you can simply undo it.

 

 

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15 hours ago, Philip Perkins said:

I usually throw the excess coil over my back when in a bag.  I applaud those of you brave enough to try and fix those cables--there is really hardly any copper in them to solder at all.  For years I did a Toline mod to mine, using Beyer straight cables, but then got lazy and just use them as is.  I see them as an expendable--they all bust eventually.

 

 

Thanks for all the great responses people!!

 

Now accepting all old Sony MDR-7506's. 

 

Please PM me your junked Sony MDR-7506's for sale link on eBay. I'll pay shipping. 

 

The hair thin green, red, and copper cables are painted. The soldering iron can actually melt the thin wires. 

 

I was always fascinated with headphones. I feel the Sony MDR-7506 is a living relic amongst the Beats/Bose cans. This was the last of an era that produced quality products for a budget. Now quality directly relates to the item costing more. Very few distinguish between quality and marketing. 

 

Is the Sony MDR-7506 the Technic MKII SL1200 turntable of the sound recording world? When Technics discontinued the SL1200 the resale price went through the roof. For reference, I got two 2xSL1200+Vestax+flightcases+cofin-case for $300 in 2003. Last I checked, one SL1200 goes for $400-$1000 depending on condition. 

 

Also, remember the classic Yamaha NS-10 story. Originally crap, inexpensive bookshelf speakers that ended up standard in any legitimate recording studio to date. 

 

 

 

 

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"Also, remember the classic Yamaha NS-10 story. Originally crap, inexpensive bookshelf speakers that ended up standard in any legitimate recording studio to date. "

 

Only after mixer Bob Clearmountain discovered that you could tame the terrible high frequency drivers in the NS-10 with a sheet or two of toilet paper hung in front of the tweeters. That discovery lead to long discussions about which toilet paper was the most musical sounding. Sound from NS-10's coming through toilet paper still sounded like shit.

 

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16 minutes ago, Eric Toline said:

"Also, remember the classic Yamaha NS-10 story. Originally crap, inexpensive bookshelf speakers that ended up standard in any legitimate recording studio to date. "

 

Only after mixer Bob Clearmountain discovered that you could tame the terrible high frequency drivers in the NS-10 with a sheet or two of toilet paper hung in front of the tweeters. That discovery lead to long discussions about which toilet paper was the most musical sounding. Sound from NS-10's coming through toilet paper still sounded like shit.

 

I can't stop laughing. 

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30 minutes ago, Philip Perkins said:

....horrible sounding monitors.....

 But we knew that. How they became the de facto studio monitors that represented  the average home stereo system is beyond understanding. I mixed on Altec 604/E's at Gotham Recording in NYC back in the 60's, not very musical but total information. 

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I've used the Auratone 5Cs since ty early 70s studio days (daze).. still do. Most folks in the NYC studios used Scots tissue paper on the original NS-10s.

 

Regarding the  Sony 7506, I use them as they are, except for Garfield Softie  ear-pad covers. I tuck the 'excess' coiled cable in one of the pockets in my bag, the cable can be pulled out as an extension if needed... this rarely happens though.

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1 hour ago, Philip Perkins said:

....horrible sounding monitors.....

 

God yes.

 

Dod you all remember this GREAT paper from REP about 30 years ago? Graphs and everything.

 

Examining the Yamaha NS-10M “Tissue Paper Phenomenon”
An Analysis of the Industry-Wide Practice of Using a 
Tissue-Paper Layer to Reduce High-Frequency Output

Recording Engineer/Producer Magazine, February 1986 – by Bob Hodas

http://www.bobhodas.com/examining-the-yamaha-ns-10m.php

 

 

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So what I am hearing is that I should begin preliminary testing on toilet paper specifications for the Sony MDR-7506 in an attempt to replicate the reduced High-Frequency output of the modern bluetooth cell phone.

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1 hour ago, Dalton Patterson said:

So what I am hearing is that I should begin preliminary testing on toilet paper specifications for the Sony MDR-7506 in an attempt to replicate the reduced High-Frequency output of the modern bluetooth cell phone.

Couldn't hurt.

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