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rcoronado

a dialogue editing roundtable with some big names

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In my small world these days, I'm finding we use slates mainly when the director wants to impress the client or similar big wig. If the director's not on board, it's not worth the fight... 

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1 hour ago, Derek H said:

How clean of a recording is necessary an impulse response to be effective? That would be my follow up to the editor that mentioned the idea. 

 

Does it or have to be dead quiet for a few seconds to get the entire tail? How loud does it need to be? If there’s anything overlapping is it useless or is there some margin for error?

 

To be an effective impulse the clap has to be clean, loud and preceded and followed by silence--the reverb tail is very important to the accuracy of the impulse.  I've never had that much luck with impulse responses made from slate claps, the really usable impulses came from playing back Altiverb's "sweep" files on hifi speakers, pretty loud.

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I gave up trying to get clean slates, and am happy when it's audible, and on tape (aka camera doesn't roll and slate before the AD calls rolling).  I don't see it changing, but I thought it was an interesting request, and of enough use to him to point it out specifically.

I agree the sweep files produce much better responses, but a clean slate clap can be a quick easy way to throw some adr lines into the same room with decent results.

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20 hours ago, Wyatt Tuzo said:

 

Maybe I've been fortunate... maybe it's just the work I get, but I've literally only had this requested of me once (and I told them that maybe I wasn't the right person for their job).

 

In terms of beating w&t's

I wonder whether its a self fulfilling prophecy, born of asserting our expectations early on... or if it's just dumb luck, but I've really only had one DP give me a headache about this.

I feel like, in my experience, once people see that there is a reason behind what you're doing/asking, they are willing to work together toward the same end. After all... its a collaborative medium.

 

Generally speaking, It's my approach to try to cover a scene with as few sources as I can get away with. A mentor once phrased it to me: "it's our goal to sell the illusion that the entire scene was recorded with a single microphone". While he was talking more specifically about the production mix (and keeping bg levels and tone consistent), It's something I always strive for (and It's my taste to arrive there through the booms, first and foremost)

 

 

 

While I agree and I absoultely cover scenes with the least amount of sources I can.

 

I can’t tell you how many times when an AD sends talent to me to be wired without even asking me. And they just assume everyone needs to be wired.

 

The main question I get asked about my kit is “How many Lavs do you have?” It’s crazy, but inexperienced poorly planned productions sees wiring talent as a quick process that allows them to do whatever they want without preparation or consideration of camera placement, light placement or even coverage... etc...

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One small upside, charging per lav (and per ifb) is an easy justification to producers for the cost of our equipment.  While "wire everyone" may not be the way any of us would choose to approach production, at least we can charge for it.

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14 hours ago, Wandering Ear said:

One small upside, charging per lav (and per ifb) is an easy justification to producers for the cost of our equipment.  While "wire everyone" may not be the way any of us would choose to approach production, at least we can charge for it.

True. And i do. Easyier to do in L A commercials than TV or Film but I've...  let's say grown to see the value of that workflow $$$. Still not the right way in at least 50% of the scenes I record.

CrewC

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We should all start saying we charge per mic/TX/IFB. The boom is only one mic, one charge. 

 

Easier said than done. I appreciate all your ideas, input and experience allot on this subject. 

 

Thanks, 

 

 

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17 hours ago, old school said:

Got around to listening to this today. It was ok. Just shows no one knows anything in our biz.

care to elaborate?

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1 hour ago, rcoronado said:

care to elaborate?

Yeah. Basically they don't know what and why we do what we do in our jobs, and we don't know what they do or even who they are. Weird workflow but it seems to work better in practice than on paper.

CrewC

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1 hour ago, old school said:

Yeah. Basically they don't know what and why we do what we do in our jobs, and we don't know what they do or even who they are. Weird workflow but it seems to work better in practice than on paper.

CrewC

This is an aspect of USA-style filmmaking that's always puzzled me.  When I started in the biz I had the notion that I could be like the soundies who worked for some famous Euro feature directors: ie the soundperson the director picks takes the film from cradle to grave.  The USA movie biz is pretty hostile to this idea, for some good reasons ( multitasking, possibly higher levels of expertise thru specialization, the whole equipment thing) and some maybe not so good reasons (union-driven division of labor, a factory mentality, force of habit and entrenched methodologies).  One by-product is the lack of comprehension of what's going on in other related but separate parts of the movie-sound "chain of custody" so to speak.   Roundtables like this won't change the situation, but they do make things more understandable and thus a bit easier I think.  I too think a similar round table with some dialog editors that are at the level these folks are at joined by some happening PSMs would be something I'd really like to hear.

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Philip, that's the same thoughts and ideas RVD and I talked about decades ago. Wish it was a pathway to a creative endeavor. Oh well, I can't complain, only dream. 

CrewC

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Here's a video I stumbled on which is a great discussion from production to post sound work flow and an example of good communication. I think a very good listen.

 

 

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