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Luke8

Advice for a novice

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3 hours ago, Jan McL said:

For some perspective Luke8 I've been doing sound for film/TV for 26 years and I still suck at it most of the time.

 

She is WAY to modest - not only has she been nominated for awards and won some.... she has one of the most alternative ways of looking at the sound recording process ever. Really she is a poet, who ended up being a sound recordist to make a living 😉 Oh - and she is a dear, dear, person, and I had one of my most memorable lunches ever with Jan. She is genius 😉

 

sb

and on a more practical note...... I pinched a small module from a talk that my chum Richard Merrick here in the UK gave. He does a great couple of slides about other mics vs the 416. He does eg the best mic for recording a commentary might be a U87, but a bloody good 2nd best is the 416..... the best mic for recording a sit down interview might be the Schoeps CCM42, but a bloody good 2nd best is the 416, and so on. I don't have a 416, but they are bloody good, bloody reliable pretty much anything mics. Buy a 2nd hand one and it will serve you for years. Happy listening.... sb

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I've had a 416 for, I don't know, 18 years or something. Not as long as a lot of people here, but a while. However, I've used it once or twice in the last 3-4 years; it's pretty much tertiary backup for me... It mostly has sentimental value. So I'm curious:

 

1) How many people here regularly use a 416 these days?

 

2) How many people here have used one at least a few times in the last two years?

 

3) How many people here would buy a 416 new today? What about used? 

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1- don't regularly use...

 

2-few times in last few years...yes... like it on a golf course especially... grass loves this mic..

 

3-would not buy a new one only because I already own one... but, I do think it is a great mic in anyone's equip. package.Sounds great in certain situations, fairly priced and durable as well..

 

 

There has probably been more recorded on that mic professionally than anyone would believe over the years...world wide..

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26 minutes ago, Jim Feeley said:

2) How many people here have used one at least a few times in the last two years?

 

3) How many people here would buy a 416 new today? What about used? 


I used to use a 416 as my main everyday mic, as I'm good friends with a pair of brother directors who I can borrow their 416 from whenever I like for however long I like. But now I use a CS3e as my day in day out shotgun, and perfectly happy to have an Aputure Deity or my Audio Technica AT4073a as my emergency back up or "danger" mic. 

If a person sees a 416 at a great price it makes a lot of sense to grab one, but does it make sense to pay full price for a brand new one? I don't think so, we're spoiled for choices now.

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I keep my 416 around because it basically saved my ass a few times.  In some locations where I had some kind of mysterious moisture or RF or whatever situation and no time or cooperation about figuring out why my other boom mics were having problems it got the shots recorded.  Those calls were close enough that I decided the 416 needed to come with me to most parties just in case.  The mic's rep for working when nothing else does is well-deserved.

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3 hours ago, Philip Perkins said:

I keep my 416 around because it basically saved my ass a few times.  In some locations where I had some kind of mysterious moisture or RF or whatever situation and no time or cooperation about figuring out why my other boom mics were having problems it got the shots recorded.  Those calls were close enough that I decided the 416 needed to come with me to most parties just in case.  The mic's rep for working when nothing else does is well-deserved.

 

Yup. The 416 is for sure my microphone binkie. I have two. Got used a bunch on the expiration of a CMIT5U this year.

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Recently I got an emergency call for a reality shoot the same day. No problem, I thought, prepared my gear and then had to realize that my CMIT was making a constant noise. Probably moisture (or sadness, since I hadn't used it for a few weeks?). I then used my 416. That was maybe the only time in the last 5 years I used it, but had I not had it I would've been royally f----d. THAT is why I believe everyone should have one, because I trust this mic more than any other. Of course no reason to buy a new one, as you'll never need to service a 416 and it's pretty unbreakable, as tried by probably thousands of noob ENG assistants in any corner of the world. 

 

By the way a day later the CMIT worked fine again without any further ado.

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I know local mixers who use the 416 regularly as their first choice outside. I own one an I use it whenever I need something with an interference tube, but it's my only shotgun for now. If I had a 4017B or a CMIT 5U, the 416 would probably get used a lot less. I'd still carry it, though, because having one means having none.

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I was thinking that I don't get a chance to use a 416 much and when I have its sound is so different from my CMIT-5U and not in a good way to my ear.  Given that, I've never had the desire to own one as a back up.  Then it occurred to me that I use a 416s a lot when working on television trucks.  I also do sports A2 work and the 416 is used extensively in that context.  For mics on hand held cameras, for crowd sounds, for spot effects (MMA fighting, boxing, baseball, football, soccer etc.).  Every truck has at least six 416s on board.  Some of them look pretty rough from years on the road but they keep on working.

So given this discussion, I'm beginning to feel tempted to get a good used one as a back up. 

   

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I note that a lot of beginners tout a singular equipment choice as if it defines them personally.  I repeat my frequent mantra, "They're only tools, and you pick the right tool for the job." 

 

Toward that end, maintaining a complete tool chest and making great choices from it more suitably defines a working professional. 

 

I'm a big fan of my Schoeps for natural sound, love how well a CS3e handles certain things like micing from below, and have used my 416 as recently as a couple of weeks ago at the Indy 500.  There was also quickly planting a DPA on a grocery shelf, and numerous mics in a van full of kids.

 

It's not about owning a universal mic, it's about making the right choice at the right time. (And, yes, there are times that I wish I had made a different choice.) 

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1 hour ago, Christian Spaeth said:

By the way a day later the CMIT worked fine again without any further ado.

You described exactly what happened to my CS3e once. Just stopped working (maybe because it was a rainy day?! Dunno, was barely raining! More like a teeny bit of occasional mist).  Not a problem though, I just switched over to my Aputure Deity for the rest of the day and everything went smoothly. 

But then the next day the CS3e was perfectly fine again! And has now been over a year of regular usage with the CS3e without any problems at all (except one more day, which was RF hell for everything! Not just the mic). Sometimes those weird almost unexplainable events "just happen". :-/ So you need to be prepared. 

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On 6/14/2018 at 3:23 PM, berniebeaudry said:

I was thinking that I don't get a chance to use a 416 much and when I have its sound is so different from my CMIT-5U and not in a good way to my ear.  Given that, I've never had the desire to own one as a back up.  Then it occurred to me that I use a 416s a lot when working on television trucks.  I also do sports A2 work and the 416 is used extensively in that context.  For mics on hand held cameras, for crowd sounds, for spot effects (MMA fighting, boxing, baseball, football, soccer etc.). 

   

 

Speaking about the sound of the 416, it‘s bad side is also its good side: off axis sound gets coloured strongly. Newer shotguns sound way more neutral for sound coming from the side or rear. To my ears the 416 loses more presence off axis than other shotguns. This may result in more problems in rooms that already have problematic lo-mid range nodes, and also makes the mic less forgiving for the boom op, but it can also help the focus in distracting exteriors (hence sports?) I recall a rare windy shoot among trees with lots of small leaves making hissy sounds off axis, and there the 416 worked better than the CMIT. 

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I use the 416 as my only boom mic due to not having any others (beside a NTG1). Never really have much of a problem with it. Inside or outside. The only issue I have had is the rear rejection. If I place it too close to the roof inside a room with Air-con in the ceiling it gets picked up almost as clearly as the talent. Just one of the quirks of the mic I guess.

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On 6/3/2018 at 8:55 PM, John Blankenship said:

 

I bought the best scalpel available a year ago and still haven't been able to do open heart surgery on a patient that lived -- go figure.

 

LOL!

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On 6/16/2018 at 3:07 AM, Glyn said:

If I place it too close to the roof inside a room with Air-con in the ceiling it gets picked up almost as clearly as the talent. Just one of the quirks of the mic I guess.

 

That‘s the quirk of the polar pattern. Lots of other mics have that same quirk, too. 

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To expand Constantin's post: 

Any gun is going to have a lobe at 180 degrees. Maximum rejection for most of these mics is at 120 degrees. 

The biggest quality difference between different guns is how -flat- the response is from off-axis. That's where reflections in a small room or close to the ceiling can give you problems. 

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