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Lancashire soundie

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About Lancashire soundie

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  • Location
    greater manchester
  • Interested in Sound for Picture
    Yes
  • About
    location sound, mostly tv

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  1. Probably referring to reflections off hard surfaces, such as booming in a concrete room. I've used an MKH60 for 20 years now, never been serviced, still in perfect working order. Don't think I'll ever change it tbh, it's a workhorse.
  2. I think I'd save the TXs for something else. The G3 is perfectly good for it's price point (I have a couple for a particular job), but it isn't really suitable for a boom (IMO). Keep them handy for the odd occasion you'll be asked to provide a radio stick mic or something. But if you insist, you could power the mic with this - http://www.pinknoise-systems.co.uk/ambient-ump-ii-universal-mic-power-supply.html
  3. I wouldn't have accepted such a refusal. I would have insisted on a refund or a date in court. The EU gives you good, solid protection against such behaviour - a microphone cable should last at least 5 years IMO.
  4. Brilliant, thanks guys. I'll bookmark that little box in case it comes up. I'm just hedging bets at the moment, trying to get production interested in having 4 radio sticks instead of 2 [ugly] wired mics shared between 3-4 people.
  5. AFAIK SDI can cover 16 channels, but my question is more about getting the audio into the camera/transmitter.
  6. I need an answer for a question which may come up soon. Possibly up to 4 presenters on handheld stick mics, feeding 2 radio receivers on the back of an RF camera on an OB. Is it possible to feed those 4 channels into the camera (no, I don't know the camera model yet) and have them fed over the digilink via SDI, to the truck, so the audio mixer can control the levels independently? Or I give the audio assistant following the RF cameraman a simple mixer and 4 channels of radio, and have him mix them and give the camera a mono feed.
  7. Take some cables so you can plug whatever you bring into consumer devices, mainly a phone or a GoPro. If you turn up with gear that terminates in XLRs you're going to have a hard time explaining it's for personal use only. Make sure you have something like Filmic Pro on your phone. FWIW I have never once been stopped in airport customs. I once had to do a Carnet from Norway and the customs officials in the UK looked at me like I was an alien.
  8. Interesting to know, I was considering buying one of these next year to replace an SQN on a job where my kit travels without me. I guess I'll look elsewhere now.
  9. > zaxnet worked on this devices some month ago with the previous owner Are you certain he wasn't adding Zaxnet via another device, like an IFB200?
  10. Primarily, audio quality. The SR receivers with smqv transmitters (for example) will sound much clearer with loud noises and the like. They'll essentially sound as though you've got an invisible wire between you and the microphone. They're very reliable too and as Jim has said, very, very well built. My tx's live in the leather cases they came in (some people don't like those) and they're as fresh as the day I bought them. As for range, you'll find they go further than the G3s by a long way. I've shot diagonally across the length of a football pitch with the presenter's tx in his front pocket on several occasions and got a reliable, usable signal. That's on 50mW with just the whips. Obviously that was in an empty stadium, but you see my point. Indoors they work extremely well, although I have had occasions inside reflective buildings where the receivers have got a bit confused. The G3s are a very good system (I have two) but the Lectros are far superior. If you're buying new, may I also suggest you look at Zaxcom's gear with internal recording and remote control of gain/frequency, and the new Audio ltd stuff which also does internal recording. One more thing - the Lectros use digital technology, there's a 3.5ms delay in the audio chain. You need to consider that when mixing with non-delayed sources like microphones.
  11. I'm using this: http://www.pinknoise-systems.co.uk/ambient-quick-pole-qp-480-boom-pole-105-350cm.html It's very well built and has enough reach for pretty much anything. This after sticking with a 2m Panamic that's still in superb condition after nearly 20 years of use. I'd stay with Ambient, just get a shorter one.
  12. The plastic tubes Rycote are selling as part of this kit aren't something they've designed and manufactured for themselves. They're fairly standard screwpack postal tubes, I've had bicycle components arrive in some.
  13. Buy one of the LMC units and chop some of the plastic off with a tiny hacksaw or a hot knife. Or a file. I doubt you need the clip to completely surround it, it only has to grip it lightly. Another option is to use a Tram tr-50 vampire cable clip, they hold microphones surprisingly well.
  14. If they don't pay they don't get. But there are situations where you can make it pay, for instance, the last time I used it was on a building site. If you're filming in a city centre, around pedestrians, there's another location. Or walking alongside a road. It's very easy to justify these things to production - nobody likes to ignore the word "safety".
  15. I use the TRX900CL and RX200. Digital out the mixer into the CL, digital across the air, digital output into the camera too if it supports it. The RX200 is small, weighs very little and has a useful level indicator on the side. The only downside is that mounting it can be a pain on cameras like the F5, due to the amount of stuff cameramen bolt onto them these days. An added benefit is that with this combination, you don't need separate timecode sync - the CL sends timecode with the audio, you just plug the RX straight into the camera's BNC and that's that. It's a simple but effective system and the RX200 will also work with any Zaxcom body-worn transmitter.
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