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Michael Capulli

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About Michael Capulli

  • Birthday 03/03/1983

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  • Location
    Chicago
  • About
    sound
  • Interested in Sound for Picture
    Yes

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    michael.capulli

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  1. For sit-down interviews in overhead-friendly conditions, I will fuss about also wiring the subject for no reason other than they want both. It's another mic that you need to monitor, adjust, and the odds are higher for interrupting to make those adjustments - all for something that will never be as good as the overhead and you have no intention of using. You are also giving them the option to change it or worse - leave it with the original split track which I have heard too many times. If the subject is not talent you also have the wiring process more challenging to deal with.
  2. from the PDF- https://assets.sennheiser.com/global-downloads/file/11061/MKH-Story_WhitePaper_en.pdf “How does RF microphone technology work? The principle is simple: Sound waves deflect the diaphragm of the condenser capsule and change the capacitance between the diaphragm and the nearby back electrode (backplate). Contrary to the more common low frequency (AF condenser) method, the capacitance variations are not converted directly into audio signals but modulate a high-frequency (radio-frequency) signal generated by an oscillator inside the microphone. This signal is then immediately demodulated inside the microphone, thus recreating the audio signal but with a very low source impedance that is well-suited for driving a transistor amplifier. Thus an RF condenser microphone is basically comprised of a transmitter and receiver that are directly wired together. The RF signal is therefore kept inside the microphone; only the audio signal is supplied to its output, just like all other microphones”
  3. tough one - it’s not worth all the effort sometimes - even if you could pull it off... you have to babysit the rig the entire time and how much of it are you really using? The margins get really narrow here - how much do you push it? How hard will it be to ditch if seen? Is the mic placement even going to be clean to make it worth dealing with hiding the TX?
  4. Is the way the DSQD emulates the 'legacy' modes similar to the way the M2R emulates the 'legacy' FM IFB mode?
  5. when I encountered issues with CMIT and humidity - it was when the mics were out on an overnight shoot and the temp was dropping and we reached the dew point. You could see dew on the pelican cases. The CMIT was not putting out any audio. It may have needed a day or two to dry out. having a few MKH options would be very wise as the design of these mics are completely different if interested look up 'an MKH story' PDF. On the other hand your MKH mics may go berserk in the presence of a cell repeater or hotspot as they are RF oscillating microphones. So both have their sensitivities but you can go back and forth when you run into problems with one or the other....
  6. First thing that came to mind - quarter watt transmitter 10 feet from an SRB receiver - you probably are overloading the receiver. When i've experienced this with the SR receivers it sounds like IMD. Make sure if you are using the SRB that you are properly spacing your frequencies. You have to check the literature - there is a certain way you need to set them up
  7. The headphone amp is very good they can drive some inefficient IEMs and phones so Line Level should be no problem - if you are going into the TX in AES then there is no level adjustment on the TX from what I remember. You must check the mixer / limiter settings on the RX because those are more for IFB functions i would leave off for a camera hop.
  8. after using 25s for years I recently upgraded to 26 because the plug was driving me nuts - slightly heavier but the same sound signature - much better isolation - built in limiter - well worth it!
  9. I’ll add to this and say that the VDB poles have a treatment on the end of each section that provides grip to the inside of the adjacent section. As the cable brings dirt up into the pole this part loses its effectiveness and I think this can be a cause of creaking when rotating the pole while extended. I’ve had a lot of use with the six section VDB (before QT) and if I ever had to get rid of a creak I would just use less of the top sections and more of the bottom sections to even it out. I’ve been using a new QT for two years now and I keep the cable as clean as I can - I don’t use it in filthy locations or put a rycote on it - and it has not started creaking yet. The new poles are amazing and I’m happy they left the length the same on the XL. They have updated the carbon fiber it is more rigid and only slightly heavier than the last one. Also the cam lock QT collars are really really good.
  10. If you don’t put the first two sections out 100% it won’t creak. Add some to the third section to even out the weight distribution.
  11. How about the fact that you cannot plug in the super cmit into a regular 3pin xlr mic cable and plug that into most common mixers. You will be limited to the 5 pins, breakout box or a device with the AES input
  12. This is the rig that I want. X3 and Lectro octopack
  13. id just have my vendor change out the windscreen for a new one it's cheap
  14. This makes sense. The 'u' and 'v' programmable presets are very valuable for me
  15. I suspect that one issue with such a narrowband signal is that all other offending signals will be much wider and can wipe out more of our mics if they are tightly spaced
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