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borjam

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About borjam

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  • Location
    Bilbao/Spain
  • Interested in Sound for Picture
    Yes
  • About
    Bilbaina Jazz Club

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  1. borjam

    Deity Connect.

    Thank you My initial skepticism about using the 2.4 GHz band has been dilluted to almost homeopathic levels now. And what I said about causing problems, I see I am most likely wrong. Maybe an obessive network administrator continuously running speed tests might notice some competition for the spectrum, but now I doubt it!
  2. borjam

    Deity Connect.

    Not trying to smear anyone, sorry in case it sounds like that. But I can't avoid being very curious about the gory details. After all I am a radio geek as well and a reliable wireless microphone on the crowded 2.4 GHz band is a real achievement! Let me try to explain. Andrew Jones said: So, it seems that the Deity system can generate those hints to tell WiFi nodes "you can transmit" or "wait". There are several mechanisms in play there. WiFi networks try to avoid collisions like the old Ethernet and in order to avoid the hidden node problem (read the chapter on the Aloha protocol on "Computer Networks" by A.S. Tanenbaum) it uses a mechanism called RTS/CTS. Especially before sending long packets that might tie the radio spectrum for a long time, an exchange warns that it will happen. Also, modern WiFi versions can detect signals from older versions. All of this helps to prevent collisions. I can imagine situations in which it might cause some issues even if negligible. Not suggesting that it could cause a wireless apocalypse or anything like that. As far as I know neither the FCC nor the European authorities perform a protocol level verification of WiFI equipment, for instance. Moreover, being a license free band shared by multiple technologies I think they mostly verify pure radio parameters like transmission power levels, out of band spurious radiation, maybe spectral masks and duty cycles in order to help, not guarantee, coexistence with other technologies, etc.
  3. borjam

    Deity Connect.

    I don't think they will conduct a complete protocol verification. But there are people much more knowledgeable than myself in that regard here. As far as I know they check for spurious emissions, power levels and spectral masks. But, again, I am not anything remotely resembling an expert on device certification, much iess on how it is done in USA
  4. borjam

    Deity Connect.

    Adaptive frequency hopping is not "messing with the spectrum" indeed. It's being more efficient. But playing with the RTS/CTS mechanisms, which is an entirely different matter, could be a problem in some environments.
  5. borjam

    Sound Devices Mix Pre-3 and Mix Pre-6

    As for the bag I got the Sachtler SN607. Despite the small size it's really spacious, and the front pocket can accept a folded MDR-7506 and a small flashlight even if a bit tight. For nature recording I can even use the extra division in the main compartment for a pair of standard size binoculars (8x42). One of my requirements was compatibility with the optional power sleds for the MixPre in case I eventually get the L-mount adapter (the USB C connectors make me a bit nervous). I haven't got the adapter yet, but the SN607 is really roomy for its size.
  6. borjam

    Deity Connect.

    Naughty, so, really playing with the RTS/CTS mechanism I can also imagine situations in which messing with the 2.4 GHz spectrum might get you in trouble. For example, shooting an interview in a place that makes a heavy usage of WiFi such as a hospital or even some industrial settings that make a heavy usage of wireless networks for inventory control, etc. Now, speaking of desensitization. Does the receiver include sharp front end filtering? I have seen situations in which WiFi equipment was unable to work due to a relative powerful continuous carrier transmitted by a microwave motion detector. I know most nowadays work on 10 GHz, but this one was a powerful signal on 2.4. I have also found issues with analog sound/video transmitters working on the 2.4 GHz band. At least the old ones I have found somewhere transmit old fashioned carriers with their sidebands. Screenshot attached from a really basic spectrum analyzer (a WiPry from Oscium) I guess in many run and gun situations you can't properly RF-sanitize the environment, so such evil equipment could ruin your day.
  7. borjam

    Rycote acquired by The Vitec Group.

    Speaking of what, I've been shopping for an audio bag lately and I got the Sachtler SN607. The puzzling thing about the Sachtler website is, the audio bags are not visible. If you go to the "Bags" section you will see the usual camera bags, but no audio. You must do a search (searching for a particular model like SN607 or "audio bag") to find them. The Spanish dealer had it in stock but I am wondering wether they are planning to discontinue them...
  8. borjam

    Rycote acquired by The Vitec Group.

    I'm not sure it's a bad thing, apart from the risk of someone buying Vitec (like Samsung has acquired Harman because of who knows) and destroying part of it. Curiously they own three different tripod manufacturers (Manfrotto, Sachtler, Gitzo and the more modest Joby) and as far as I know they have respected their quite different product lines. You wouldn't guess they belong to the same conglomerate. As for Rycote compared to Petrol, Rycote is 100% audio, nothing else. Why would they purchase it? Basicly the high end of that audio market is shared by Cinela and Rycote, right? At the same time there are lots of links between Rode and Rycote with Rode addressing the low end. I could imagine a popular name like Manfrotto relseasing low end versions of Rycote products for podcasters, youtubers, etc, but the Rycote name is so valuable.
  9. borjam

    Sound Devices Mix Pre-3 and Mix Pre-6

    I wonder how compatible they are with the original Mackie Control. I'll try and plug a Tascam US2400 to the MixPre 3 for the fun of it
  10. borjam

    small bag

    I am now looking at bags and wondering which one to get. So far I am using a messy makeshift option, a small Lowepro camera bag with no proper cable routing. The options seem to be: - Orca OR-27 - Sachtler SN607 - K-Tek Stingray MIxpro Unfortunately I don't have a proper retailer nearby where I could have an actual look at them. Of the three options I think that the most capacious would be the SN607, where I could accomodate a MixPre 3, some accessories (spare batteries, etc) and maybe headphones plus small binoculars. I see that it would be compatible with a MixPre 6 inca se I wanted to upgrade to Ambisonics. I am making some nature recordings and I may include one or two wireless receivers, so I prefer a not too tight bag. Resistance to nasty weather is a plus of course! I forgot. Does a 10 inch iPad Pro fit inside?
  11. borjam

    Deity Connect.

    Still there are tricks for that, like redundancy Given enough redundancy you can survive lots of those “collisions”. Phone drop outs are a more extreme example. A combination of too many users per cell and, to make it worse, unpredictable workload. Mics are much better in that aspect. Not that a microphone will suddenly decide by itself to send HD video
  12. borjam

    Deity Connect.

    The nice thing about spread spectrum is that several users may share the same band and, at most, each user will only perceive a higher noise floor. Although miracles don't exist it can look like magic. The trick is as simple as adding some randomness to the frequency decision process so that two units won't follow the same predictable sequence. Now I'm really curious to see these working!
  13. borjam

    Deity Connect.

    Awesome! So, a combination of spread spectrum and, did I read playing with the WiFi RTS/CTS?
  14. borjam

    Deity Connect.

    My apologies if I am wrong. When I saw a Deity Mic 2 review I searched out of curiosity and there was some website confusion between Aputureshop.eu and eu.aputure.com. I presume Aputureshop is a dealer, and that reminded me of some Chinese osciloscope manufacturers whose dealers are allowed to create domains that really look like it's the manufacturer. None of the two European websites seemed to have version 2 of the microphone at that time anyway. So how does it manage to work despite the horrible pollution on 2.4 GHz? (Just curious).
  15. borjam

    Deity Connect.

    I have my doubts regarding the 2.4 GHz band because it´s terribly polluted. I remember back in 2002 or so when wireless networks were a very expensive rarity. In order to keep a link across the street I didn't even need an access point, I used two poorly placed wireless cards in p2p mode. The band was empty at most locations except for the odd microwave motion detector and the typical AV links. There are amazing spread spectrum modulation schemes that can work wonders (I remember my experiments with LoRa and 2 dBm transmissions, albeit extremely slow of course) but miracles don't exist. Maybe they are benefitting from the latest advances in computing/power consumption relationship. That said, Deity need to get their act together. Last month I wondered about their microphones and I checked several websites in Europe. It wasn't clear which of the official looking websites was the manufacturer or just a dealer. With these Chinese brands often the "official" website is a dealer. Moreover, the arrangement can expire and a new website may appear while the old one keeps old stock for sale. And if you want to buy the latest version, how do you know?
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