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Daniellow

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Posts posted by Daniellow

  1. Hello all, 

     

    I'm doing sound for all the pick-up / insert / and additional shooting that an episodic going into it's fourth season is doing here in LA.  Production has requested an "earwig" or anything essentially invisible to the camera for the talent to have in-ear so that VTR can cue them with content already shot.  First round of this I used my Sennheiser IEM system with the Bubblebee Sidekick 3 IFB in-ear, and it worked fabulously.  The cable is INCREDIBLY discreet, but there will likely be scenes coming up where we don't have the additional support of a wig to help conceal. 

     

    SO...  WHAT ARE Y'ALL USING FOR NEAR INVISIBLE IN-EAR IFBs?   

     

    I know there are offerings by Phonak, Otto, PSC, and Comtek, but is there any codified, go-to standard for this need?

    Also noteworthy is production can only throw $200 or so dollars at whatever we choose.

    (Bubblebee Sidekick 3 in the image below)

     

    Screen Shot 2022-03-31 at 1.31.18 PM.png

  2. On 9/29/2020 at 12:51 AM, IronFilm said:


    If it is an indoor fire for a short film, then they might very well only want to have a real fire for the opening wide shot. All the mid/tight shots should be with a simulated fire (lots of LED panels now have the ability to be programmed to do this), for a number of reasons: health & safety, lighting consistency, and for sound too. 

     

    Exactly what I'm thinking.  DP is testing out a "light gag" this weekend, if it's convincing that's how we'll do coverage.

    Cheers mate.

     

    On 9/28/2020 at 5:20 PM, Jim Feeley said:

    With a good gas fire, even an off-the-shelf one, you all can sync the flame height to the shot (and possibly have more-consistent and not surprising sound issues). Looks like you've said this above. But assuming the gas isn't too loud, it looks gas looks like it could be a win-win for you and picture. 

     

    Let us know how it goes. Good luck!

    I hadn't thought of an "out-of-the-box" or "off-the-shelf" --possibly propane solution--great suggestion.  Shoot is end of next week, so, I'll definitely let you all know which lane we chose and how it went.

     

    Thanks Jim.

  3. On 9/27/2020 at 11:47 AM, Jeff Wexler said:

    First question: are these fires being created for the purpose of the shoot or are you shooting a documentary that takes place where there is  a bonfire already integral to the event?
     

     

     


    Really appreciate the lightning-speed response Jeff.

     

    definitely the prior.

     

    This is a short/narrative with the principle scene I’m asking about indoors (cabin vibe), with a rustic fireplace going.

    i have inquired if it is / can be just gas—if so, that would certainly get two birds, one stone. Consistency for lighting continuity, and exponentially quieter and also consistent enough to possibly get tone and pull out / replace w/fx in post.
     

    It’s a low-ish budget indie, and I’ve already inquired—there is no designated sfx / pyrotechnics individual present.

     

    I’m preparing for worst case scenario-natural logs w/ subsequent natural crackling/popping.

     

    Does that help?

    On 9/27/2020 at 12:35 PM, David Waelder said:

    If the situation is a controlled fire operated by a special effects technician, you should contact that person beforehand to introduce yourself and let him know that you'll be recording sound. You'll want to respectfully request a silencer for the gas line. A silencer is basically a length of gas pipe loosely stuffed with steel wool. It cuts down the hiss of the gas significantly. Don't assume that the EFX person will have that sort of gear on the truck. I've had EFX technicians tell me more than once that they have line silencing components back in their shop and would have brought them along if only someone had asked.

     

    David


    Fantastic.  All very sage and thoughtful, thank you David. No technician present, but I have filed away this invaluable approach / technique for future relevant situations.

    7 hours ago, berniebeaudry said:

    If it is a real fire I'd suggest using lavs in addition to the boom. 

    Bernie


    Thanks Bernie.
    Looking like it’s real log-burning, and I was very much thinking the same. I’ve also found my well place Cos11’s under maybe one layer of clothing mitigates environmental noise extremely well, often when compared to boom.

     

    cheers.

  4. Ahoy sound colleagues!  Been utilizing the expertise on here for quite a while but this is my first post/query.

     

    Have a short coming up in a week, and l am on the hunt for any clever hacks on capturing super clean dialogue amidst all the varied crackling of log burning fires.

    So far, coming at this from one two potential solutions:

        A) Camera dept. cheats the "flames" and completely fakes it, i.e. no real flames = completely clean dialogue, or 

    B) We  shoot with live flames in the fireplace and bonfire, and I endeavor close directional booming with lower gain levels.

     

    Of course if there is another solution here I am missing, totally open to that too.  Thanks and cheers. 

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