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MatthewFreedAudio

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Everything posted by MatthewFreedAudio

  1. There a million posts and threads on here and other forums answering your question. Do a search. Don't expect other people to do your homework for you. Production Sound Mixing for Television, Film, and Commercials. www.matthewfreed.com
  2. You've been doing sound mixing for two weeks and you're an apprentice at the company? And the company was hired for a job where they sent you out to handle a professional job? It wasn't the mic that got you fired from the gig. Production Sound Mixing for Television, Film, and Commercials. www.matthewfreed.com
  3. As others have mentioned, it is 100% the responsibility of the camera department and/or production to make sure their camera has the necessary breakout cables to allow proper audio, timecode, or any other connectors to interface with the rest of production. Production Sound Mixing for Television, Film, and Commercials. www.matthewfreed.com
  4. The OP's screen name is "Sound Man." Is this thread serious? Does the OP really expect other people to make this decision or give him accurate advice with no information? Production Sound Mixing for Television, Film, and Commercials. www.matthewfreed.com
  5. I've never been a fan of mics directly on a wooden instrument such as a violin, cello, etc. To my ear that technique is extremely abrasive. Extremely close micing like that is useful in a live situation where sound reinforcement/PA system is in use as it reduces the chance for feedback. But, in your situation I would opt for a stereo pair or even just a single mic roughly 3-5 feet back from the player. Reverb can be added later or if the acoustic space you're in is particularly interesting then also record stereo ambience at a distance. If you're too close with stereo mics AND a source mic you'll get phasing the more you blend the two. Production Sound Mixing for Television, Film, and Commercials. www.matthewfreed.com
  6. I ordered one of these last week and it should be coming soon I think. I've often thought something like this would be handy. I'll report back with some real-world usage soon. Production Sound Mixing for Television, Film, and Commercials. www.matthewfreed.com
  7. It sounds like someone who has primarily (or only) done music recording was brought on for the dialogue recording. There won't be any noticeable difference between 44.1/48k. Having 32-bit floating point is fine and all but your hardware is most likely converting it to 24-bit for the DA conversion to your monitors. Sure 48k is a a more true picture of the original Sin wave and 32-bit has more dynamic range than 16 or 24. However, I would bet dollars to donuts the hardware was 24-bit A/D conversion and their software stamped it as 32-bit for its internal use. I also have a strong feeling there are bigger fish to fry on that project when it comes to sound than the sample rate and bit depth. Production Sound Mixing for Television, Film, and Commercials. www.matthewfreed.com
  8. You can't shake a stick in Austin without hitting a good place to eat. Production Sound Mixing for Television, Film, and Commercials. www.matthewfreed.com
  9. I bought a cheap $10 multi card reader at Walmart three years ago. It gets near daily use and still works fine. Production Sound Mixing for Television, Film, and Commercials. www.matthewfreed.com
  10. A few things overheard backstage at that show: "Oh god, I can't believe I agreed to this." "Yeah, I make a 12 inch wrapper look good!" "I thought that was a bump of coke! Now you're telling me it was just salt?!" Production Sound Mixing for Television, Film, and Commercials. www.matthewfreed.com
  11. I used to name my files as the Scene and Take Number but doing that leads to this exact problem. In the long run I believe it is better to have all audio files named a unique, sequential name/number. This could be done using a daily name such as "13Y09M11_T01.wav" Your sound report would then have that under "File Name" and under Scene and Take you notate what is on the slate as per the scripty. What matters is that everyone is on the same page and an accurate accounting of the file names and slates are happening. Production Sound Mixing for Television, Film, and Commercials. www.matthewfreed.com
  12. Pampasound... This topic has been covered multiple times in multiple threads. It is worth reading previous posts on the topic because not only will you learn the answer to your specific question but you will also learn many other helpful and needed facts, opinions, work-arounds, and options regarding transmitters and receivers in close proximity. Production Sound Mixing for Television, Film, and Commercials. www.matthewfreed.com
  13. Another $200 for the day rate plus an additional $300-$400 for gear. Plus per diem, travel, and lodging if there isn't someone truly local. Production Sound Mixing for Television, Film, and Commercials. www.matthewfreed.com
  14. What is sad about it? It's a popular show. We all work in the entertainment BUSINESS and the goal of every single production is to get as many viewers as possible. The method of getting those viewers differs from one show to the next but the end goal is the same: eyes on the screen. Production Sound Mixing for Television, Film, and Commercials. www.matthewfreed.com
  15. The Senator needs to have a DS Ultra Master Reset performed on himself. I couldn't resist. Production Sound Mixing for Television, Film, and Commercials. www.matthewfreed.com
  16. I'm going to be blunt: You seriously couldn't find anything on this forum or anywhere else regarding timecode and DSLR cameras? Production Sound Mixing for Television, Film, and Commercials. www.matthewfreed.com
  17. Creative input is what other departments contribute to a film that messes up the sound. Just kidding...mostly. Having your mix dismissed out of hand is unfortunate. Those particular folks may have a lot of experience with poor production mixes. So, prove them wrong. Show them just how good you can mix so they don't have to re-do the work. I very much appreciate iso tracks to save my own butt. While I like to think of myself as perfect (and my wife reminds me I'm not) I do make mistakes and don't always get the mix spot on. Iso tracks can save an otherwise fantastic take. As was mentioned above, it is a collaborative effort from beginning to end. Production Sound Mixing for Television, Film, and Commercials. www.matthewfreed.com
  18. The only people who can accurately answer your questions are people at Sound Devices, Gotham, or one of the other local places in NYC. Why don't you try calling them first thing in the morning and report back. Perhaps one of them can answer your question outside of business hours on here. Production Sound Mixing for Television, Film, and Commercials. www.matthewfreed.com
  19. On one hand the people accepting those jobs and saying they are qualified sound mixers are at fault. However, on the other hand, it is also the responsibility of the producers to know who and what they are hiring. An experienced producer should realize that someone accepting a sound mixing position for $100/day isn't going to yield a quality product. I've been amazed at the number of line producers or other general producers who have absolutely no clue what questions they should be asking me. Production Sound Mixing for Television, Film, and Commercials. www.matthewfreed.com
  20. Additional information is definitely helpful. I frequently record the sound of loud and fast cars for the show I work on. I'll typically use some Zaxcom recorders with Sanken lavs and Rycote wind screens placed at key points around the car. Exhaust, engine bay, air ride if its there, etc. For the drive-bys I'll use a few different cardioid and shotgun mics. If dialogue is to be recorded I'll also have either plant mics or lavs on the people all going to a separate multi-track. Production Sound Mixing for Television, Film, and Commercials. www.matthewfreed.com
  21. You are still on the clock. I don't clock out until I have all my gear packed up, audio is transferred or handed off, and I'm actually heading out. Production Sound Mixing for Television, Film, and Commercials. www.matthewfreed.com
  22. The entire signal chain of the test also makes quite a difference. Let's say you take two microphones, a very expensive, fantastic quality mic and a cheap, low-grade mic and put them both through a very cheap, low-end mic pre, bad A/D converters, and then listen back through an equally lousy signal chain to your speakers. Chances are you aren't hearing what a good mic can and should sound like. Now, take those same two microphones and put them through a high grade signal chain and the differences will be striking. A Ferrari is just as fast as a Pinto at a red light. Production Sound Mixing for Television, Film, and Commercials. www.matthewfreed.com
  23. I love the idea of a small footprint mixer and recorder combo. I frequently have small gigs with one boom and a couple lavs but still need ISO channels and a mix. Even a Nomad is larger than what is called for on those types of gigs and a MixPre-D doesn't record or have a built in transmitter. I do worry about one aspect of the unit going down and having to send in the entire box. However, MAXX isn't too expensive so if you are extremely worried about that...buy two!
  24. It'll buff right out. Production Sound Mixing for Television, Film, and Commercials. www.matthewfreed.com
  25. I've used both Sound Devices and Zaxcom mixers and recorders in temperatures ranging from 120 Fahrenheit down to negative 35 (yup, -35). Both company provide solid gear that works in extreme temperatures. LCD screens tend to be a bit sluggish in extreme cold and all the gear radiates additional heat. I took a heat sensing gun to my Zaxcom Fusion 12 when the air temperature was 110 and the recorder showed 136 degrees and it was operating just fine. For a small recorder and/or mixer I would highly recommend a SD302 or MixPre-D or a Zaxcom Nomad (especially if you also need a recorder) Production Sound Mixing for Television, Film, and Commercials. www.matthewfreed.com
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