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Don't think many readers will seriously think about abandoning the van they drive down the freeway with but...

this would be cute for moving the rig around the lot (better than a golf cart anyway): http://velove.se/  

 

Ah I see mono posted it above already (with pictures!).

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I could see my equipment rack (all 12v BTW) on the back of this with a large agm battery powering the equipment in the day and the Agm batt would have enough juice to carry me home at night. A Sonic Symbiotic Relationship of sorts... charge it with a few solar roof cells and bang! Your off the grid with a cool low carbon footprint!  look Ma, no ground loops...

stretch-black1.jpg

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On 9/20/2018 at 5:35 AM, daniel said:

The TreGo (posted by mono above) would make a cool mini cart:

http://trego-trolley.com/new-products/

 

I almost considered building one from a Burley Travoy: https://burley.com/product/travoy/ but I couldn't find a cheap used one to modify. I have one and it's a fantastic little trailer. Perfect for going to the farmer's market, since you can unhook it from the bike and use it as a shopping cart.

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Ya, plucking spokes and using tone to establish relative tension is a useful, fun, and very old technique. Back in the day when I was a shop mechanic and then as an itinerant bike racer built wheels for other racers as what would now be called a side hustle, we used tuning pipes with different pitches as targets for wheels with different length spokes, rims, etc. We would argue about whether you should pluck spokes with finger nails or guitar picks, and if picks, which one. But I used the technique more for establishing relative tension than absolute tension. Also for showing off; it impressed the hell out of people. 🙂

 

Perhaps at Easton, with the same rims, spokes, pattern, etc., they can fully build a wheel just by tone. Also, those people clearly build a whole lot of similar wheels day in and day out. But most serious builders I know also use a spoke tensiometer. The tensiometer is great for determining absolute tension, and that's really important. Then you can use tone to make sure sets of spokes have the same tension. Maybe that's a bigger deal if you build different sorts of wheels in a month; I haven't built wheels in a long time. But I really dig the craft behind bike wheels.

 

So Easton didn't invent or uniquely use that technique, but it's a cool video. Always good when wheelbuilders get to show off. 🙂

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On 9/29/2018 at 9:48 PM, Jim Feeley said:

Ya, plucking spokes and using tone to establish relative tension is a useful, fun, and very old technique. 🙂

 

I have used the "plucking" technique to tune guy wires on communication towers. It works;)

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On 9/30/2018 at 1:48 AM, Jim Feeley said:

Ya, plucking spokes and using tone to establish relative tension is a useful, fun, and very old technique. Back in the day when I was a shop mechanic and then as an itinerant bike racer built wheels for other racers as what would now be called a side hustle, we used tuning pipes with different pitches as targets for wheels with different length spokes, rims, etc. We would argue about whether you should pluck spokes with finger nails or guitar picks, and if picks, which one. But I used the technique more for establishing relative tension than absolute tension. Also for showing off; it impressed the hell out of people. 🙂

 

Perhaps at Easton, with the same rims, spokes, pattern, etc., they can fully build a wheel just by tone. Also, those people clearly build a whole lot of similar wheels day in and day out. But most serious builders I know also use a spoke tensiometer. The tensiometer is great for determining absolute tension, and that's really important. Then you can use tone to make sure sets of spokes have the same tension. Maybe that's a bigger deal if you build different sorts of wheels in a month; I haven't built wheels in a long time. But I really dig the craft behind bike wheels.

 

So Easton didn't invent or uniquely use that technique, but it's a cool video. Always good when wheelbuilders get to show off. 🙂

Spoke tensionmeters are awesome (when building a new wheel). I built a dynamo wheel with 1 recently (Flo/Son/sapim) and the it was pretty good before it even went into the jig.

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