Jump to content

Wiring Sanken Cos 11 to TA5F


Manx
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hey guys,

 

When we ordered the sanken cos 11 for Lectrosonics, something went wrong, and they came with XLR connectors. So we had to wire them ourselves to the TA5F connector. 

On sanken.com there are two diagrams, one includes a 1K resistor in the circuit (normal version), and the other does not (red mark version) . We used the method without the 1K resistor (red mark version). 

The process was very delicate but it worked just fine.

The problem is that i'm feeling that there's too much gain, even when the gain level on the transmitter is just somewhere between the first and the second dash. The normal speaking level is good but it gets risky on sudden shouts (not screams), something that i didn't sense on other systems (such as sennheiser G3's with TRAMs or even Sanken Cos).And what's confusing is that on the sanken website, they note that "if you have too much gain, it's recommended to use the Red Mark version" wich is what we did. Am I doing something wrong here?


Any thoughts?

 

Thanks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When you have a question about a certain piece of gear, there seems to be 3 options people choose.  Look at this list and tell me which is the most logical place to ask this question.

 

in order of popularity

 

3. Ask the manufacturer.

2. Ask the dealer

1. ASK RANDOM PEOPLE ON THE INTERNET

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When you have a question about a certain piece of gear, there seems to be 3 options people choose.  Look at this list and tell me which is the most logical place to ask this question.

 

in order of popularity

 

3. Ask the manufacturer.

2. Ask the dealer

1. ASK RANDOM PEOPLE ON THE INTERNET

 

Here's some actual measurements that are good for any of the servo transmitters, not just the MM. Short answer, use a 1k.

 

http://ns1.lectrosonics.com/faqdb/index.php/component/mtree/025-how-should-i-wire-a-sanken-cos-11-or-other-three-wire-microphone-to-a-mm400-transmitter-ive-seen-several-recommended-wirings?Itemid=

 

Best Regards,

Larry Fisher

Lectrosonics

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Red dot does not refer to the wiring it refers to the mic you are using. Red dot sanken cos-11 are 9db quieter than regular cos-11s. They are excellent tools for loud dialog scenes. The wiring you are referring to is different for different transmitters. You need to look at lectrosonics wiring diagrams. Does your transmitter have a servo bias inout? All SM and um400a units do. Older sm units are 10 db quieter than newer sm and all SMV units. Universal wiring requires resistors.post-2879-0-67055300-1361249364_thumb.jp

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When you have a question about a certain piece of gear, there seems to be 3 options people choose. Look at this list and tell me which is the most logical place to ask this question. in order of popularity 3. Ask the manufacturer. 2. Ask the dealer 1. ASK RANDOM PEOPLE ON THE INTERNET
There seem to be 2 types of people on the internet. 1. Assholes 2. Normal people Which one do you think you are, CCalandro?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

*(update - drawing is for the CUB-01)*

 

In the search to wire up all of my COS-11 for both SM and UM Tx's I was given a schematic from a repair technician at my local shop. 

 

He called it a 2-Wire wiring, and said it would sound just as good and work on all my Tx's.

 

He mentioned that it *might* reverse phase of the mic.

 

Before I go ahead an experiment with it, and of course spend the time doing the soldering I wanted to get some feedback from some not so random people on the net. 

 

Basically his drawing is:

SHIELD - (1)

BLACK - (2)

WHITE - 560 ohm Resistor - (3)

470pF Cap between (1) and (3)

 

Drawing he gave me is attached.

post-6907-0-45409700-1370043723_thumb.jp

Edited by JamesB
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In the search to wire up all of my COS-11 for both SM and UM Tx's I was given a schematic from a repair technician at my local shop. 

 

He called it a 2-Wire wiring, and said it would sound just as good and work on all my Tx's.

 

He mentioned that it *might* reverse phase of the mic.

 

Before I go ahead an experiment with it, and of course spend the time doing the soldering I wanted to get some feedback from some not so random people on the net. 

 

Basically his drawing is:

SHIELD - (1)

BLACK - (2)

WHITE - 560 ohm Resistor - (3)

470pF Cap between (1) and (3)

 

Drawing he gave me is attached.

The technician is totally, completely, 100% , absolutely wrong. It totally amazes me that people will trust us to make a wireless system that they spend multiple thousands of dollars to buy and then ignore our extensively tested wiring directions. Trust me, we know more about wiring a COS-11 to a Lectro transmitter than even Sanken does. Use diagram 4 or 11 from this page: http://www.lectrosonics.com/Microphone-Wiring/uhf-transmitter-5-pin-input-jack-wiring.html

Rant over and have a nice day.

Best Regards,

Larry Fisher

Lectrosonics

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@Larry:

 

I have legacy COS 11's and Countryman B6 mics that I'm using with 200 series transmitters. I'd like to make the mics "universal" for all Lectro transmitters including the new SMQVs that I am getting. Should I pull apart the TA5F and rewire, clip the connector off and rewire to a new TA5F, or send to the usual suspects and have them done by an experienced tech? I'm not good with resistors (except the ones in the camera department). Please advise...

 

Steve Wytas

www.audio911.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@Larry:

 

I have legacy COS 11's and Countryman B6 mics that I'm using with 200 series transmitters. I'd like to make the mics "universal" for all Lectro transmitters including the new SMQVs that I am getting. Should I pull apart the TA5F and rewire, clip the connector off and rewire to a new TA5F, or send to the usual suspects and have them done by an experienced tech? I'm not good with resistors (except the ones in the camera department). Please advise...

 

Steve Wytas

www.audio911.com

Hi Steve,

I can only tell you what I do -  I hand them to someone else to wire. We even bought a thermal stripper to help with stripping the fine wire mixed with fiber.

I will spend several extra years in purgatory because of the cursing I've done while trying to solder those unsolderable wires. Others, that have the magic touch, may have different opinions but this one's mine. 

Best,

Larry F

Lectro

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Steve,

I can only tell you what I do -  I hand them to someone else to wire. We even bought a thermal stripper to help with stripping the fine wire mixed with fiber.

I will spend several extra years in purgatory because of the cursing I've done while trying to solder those unsolderable wires. Others, that have the magic touch, may have different opinions but this one's mine. 

Best,

Larry F

Lectro

 

 

I have found liquid resin flux to be good when dealing with those pesky fibers.  A drop of resin on the wires and fibers and then let the capalery action begin with solder.  Result is a perfectly tinned connection.  8)   

 

@Larry:

 

I have legacy COS 11's and Countryman B6 mics that I'm using with 200 series transmitters. I'd like to make the mics "universal" for all Lectro transmitters including the new SMQVs that I am getting. Should I pull apart the TA5F and rewire, clip the connector off and rewire to a new TA5F, or send to the usual suspects and have them done by an experienced tech? I'm not good with resistors (except the ones in the camera department). Please advise...

 

Steve Wytas

www.audio911.com

 

Same trick as above Steve.  If you have trouble with resistors, I find it helpful to tin the pins, resistor leads and wires before soldering. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

LarryF, on 04 Jun 2013 - 07:25 AM, said:

The technician is totally, completely, 100% , absolutely wrong. It totally amazes me that people will trust us to make a wireless system that they spend multiple thousands of dollars to buy and then ignore our extensively tested wiring directions. Trust me, we know more about wiring a COS-11 to a Lectro transmitter than even Sanken does. Use diagram 4 or 11 from this page: http://www.lectrosonics.com/Microphone-Wiring/uhf-transmitter-5-pin-input-jack-wiring.html

Rant over and have a nice day.

Best Regards,

Larry Fisher

Lectrosonics

Wow. Glad I asked. Thanks so much for your response Larry.

I must say I am surprised, as this is not from a small shop... I'll have to talk with him about your knowledge on the subject. He gave me the feeling he built many wires like this. He was even bold enough to say he didn't know why everyone didn't just use it this way. Out of curiosity, what problems would you expect from wiring in this method. It sounded like the holy grail of mic wiring. I don't like the sound of universal on my SMs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow. Glad I asked. Thanks so much for your response Larry.

I must say I am surprised, as this is not from a small shop... I'll have to talk with him about your knowledge on the subject. He gave me the feeling he built many wires like this. He was even bold enough to say he didn't know why everyone didn't just use it this way. Out of curiosity, what problems would you expect from wiring in this method. It sounded like the holy grail of mic wiring. I don't like the sound of universal on my SMs.

Hi James,

The universal wiring in diagram 5 is specifically designed for the SM and "just happens" to work well on the older non servo units. Our wiring in diagram 11 is a simpler way to hook up a Cos-11 that works well and eliminates the resistor by using an internal resistor. It isn't universal as the older units don't have it.  As in sufferage, "universal" does not mean bad. (Instead of universal maybe we should have called it "correct".)

 

The 470 pf capacitor rolls up the response at 5 MHz which is not great but we have enough bypassing to keep things stable.

 

The tech's COS-11 is wired to 4 Volts on pin 2 and then wired to 2 Volts on pin 3 (servo function). Two Volts total across the COS-11 is not ideal but it gets worse.  Pin 3 is a current source above 50 Hz and a voltage source below 50 Hz. If you have a source you must have a sink to go with it or there is no current flow and this is the case with this wiring. Current is flowing into th COS-11 from pin 2 and potentially from pin 3. Where is the sink? 

 

The tech's wiring definitely will prevent the selectable low frequency filter from operating.

 

When wired according to our diagram, current flows from pin 3 through the COS-11 black wire and out of the COS-11 through the white wire, then through the recommended resistor to ground. The servo is happy, the adjustable filter is happy, the COS-11 is happy, I am happy and most importantly, you are happy.

 

The technician's wiring makes my head hurt.

 

Best Regards,

Larry Fisher

Lectrosonics

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The technician's wiring makes my head hurt.

 

Best Regards,

Larry Fisher

Lectrosonics

Thanks for the detailed explanation Larry, this is really helpful. Looking forward to discussing this at the shop. More so then doing me the favor of explaining it, this is helpful to the shop to stop them from selling it.

James

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The schematic I posted is unfortunately the the correct wiring diagram for a Sanken CUB-01 -  I must have placed it in the wrong bag waiting to install.   *facepalm*

 

I will switch over to universal wiring for my COS-11s until I am exclusively using SM tx.

 

I will head to another forum to discuss the d.i.y. removal of my foot from my mouth.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The schematic I posted is unfortunately the the correct wiring diagram for a Sanken CUB-01 -  I must have placed it in the wrong bag waiting to install.   *facepalm*

 

I will switch over to universal wiring for my COS-11s until I am exclusively using SM tx.

 

I will head to another forum to discuss the d.i.y. removal of my foot from my mouth.

One, that makes a lot more sense now, and two, I should have caught that. Both are correct Sanken wirings, just for different models. My head doesn't hurt as much now.

Best,

Larry F

Lectro

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

The technician is totally, completely, 100% , absolutely wrong. It totally amazes me that people will trust us to make a wireless system that they spend multiple thousands of dollars to buy and then ignore our extensively tested wiring directions. Trust me, we know more about wiring a COS-11 to a Lectro transmitter than even Sanken does. Use diagram 4 or 11 from this page: http://www.lectrosonics.com/Microphone-Wiring/uhf-transmitter-5-pin-input-jack-wiring.html

 

 

In case anyone happens upon this thread (like I did), you will find the link provided by Mr. Fisher above no longer works.

 

I believe the correct URL as of this writing (March 2015) should be: http://www.lectrosonics.com/Support/Microphone-Wiring/uhf-transmitter-5-pin-input-jack-wiring.html

Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://www.lectrosonics.com/Microphone-Wiring/uhf-transmitter-5-pin-input-jack-wiring.html

http://www.lectrosonics.com/Support/Microphone-Wiring/uhf-transmitter-5-pin-input-jack-wiring.html

 

In case anyone happens upon this thread (like I did), you will find the link provided by Mr. Fisher above no longer works.

 

I believe the correct URL as of this writing (March 2015) should be: http://www.lectrosonics.com/Support/Microphone-Wiring/uhf-transmitter-5-pin-input-jack-wiring.html

Thanks.

LEF

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...