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NEW: iPower AA batteries. Li-poly rechargeable.


Derek H
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Yes, but they put out a regulated 1.5 volts versus NiMH 1.2. So I'm curious if these end up playing better with high drain devices. 

There could be other pros/cons. Better build quality perhaps (all my NiMH labels are getting torn up the longer I use them), faster, more consistent charging. Reliability, etc.

Anyways, interested in hearing more and thought it would be of interest to the group.

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15 hours ago, Constantin said:

That's not really ideal...

Isnt that how regular liths meter hence the dif batt settings on tx and rx meters? Not sure why but i am excited about these. Although i have become extremely fond of te black eneloop pro's

-Ken

 

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Isnt that how regular liths meter hence the dif batt settings on tx and rx meters? Not sure why but i am excited about these. Although i have become extremely fond of te black eneloop pro's

-Ken

 

So am I, which is why I have only very limited experience with lithiums. But I do seem to remember that they would deplete normally on the meter.

Fo this regulator reason I am not so thrilled about these. Yes, I could use a timer, but that's not very reliable. If there is no kind of warning system, I'd be reluctant to use them

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I believe these are a 3.6 Volt li ion with a switching power supply to provide a standard aa voltage of 1.5 Volts. The biggest advantage is a higher voltage than eneloops. Otherwise, I don't see an advantage. I'm sure they are priced higher with similar power capacity, i.e., battery life in a transmitter.

Best, Larry F

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I believe these are a 3.6 Volt li ion with a switching power supply to provide a standard aa voltage of 1.5 Volts. The biggest advantage is a higher voltage than eneloops. Otherwise, I don't see an advantage. I'm sure they are priced higher with similar power capacity, i.e., battery life in a transmitter.

Best, Larry F

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On 22 May 2016 at 6:17 AM, Johnny Karlsson said:

Note: 2600 mWh = 2166 mAh. So they should be on par with regular Eneloops. Not that exciting to be honest....

i thought the same, but 2166mAh @ constant 1.5V or 2000mAh @ variable 1.4-1V (with a mean of about 1.27V) could be about 25%-30% difference.

that said, the black envelop come out about the same and are likely less hassle and more reliable, so unless they are a lot cheaper or lighter i don't see much of a point.

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On May 23, 2016 at 4:49 PM, berniebeaudry said:

Some transmitters get fairly warm to the touch.  The rechargeable Lipos are claiming that they don't heat up unlike the Nimh rechargeables.  Would this affect the temperature of the outside of the tx at all?

Hi Bernie,

The claims are not true. It's the electronics that get warm, not the NiMh. NiMh generate very little heat during discharge unless it is a dead short. Then things can get exciting.

Best, Larry F

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Continuing with what Larry said, heat is the result of power consumption.  A battery should consume as little power as possible, otherwise it's an inefficient supply.

For the most part, the amount of heat generated is a result of the power consumption of the device being powered.

In a situation where two different devices each consumes the same amount of power, but they don't feel the same temperature-wise to the touch, it's mostly a function of how each device dissipates the heat, rather than the amount of heat generated.

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7 hours ago, Derek H said:

Not sure what to make of that discharge curve chart but it's pretty amusing.

 

yeah, seems to be a bit of "cheating" by plotting the base line at 0.8V, if you'd plot it on 0V it would give a better visual representation.

also doubting that the range really would get that much worse, I'd expect any decent wireless system will use a regulated power system which keeps the voltage (and thus range) pretty constant over the life of the battery.

on the other hand, charging in 1.5hour is pretty impressive and if the shelf discharge is kept under control and they are light weight and affordable it could be a nice battery.

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