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4 hours ago, DanieldH said:

In the old days, we've crimped our BNCs to RG59 for various video signals, including timecode, in the local TV station. The crimp tools especially the dies where a few hundred Deutschmark, the connectors where moderate. Then came SDI and we needed new cables with new BNCs with new dies, all fitted to each other and the senitive digital signal. A wile later, the BNCs and the crimp tools made for analog video poped up cheaper on Conrad Electronics and alike.
Timecode is an incredibly forgiving, low bandwidth, digital signal from the middle-ages of the film and TV industry. After all, it tells you max 30 times a second, what time it is and how many times it has told this before within the very second. It fits well through analog video and you can daisy-chain that signal through many machines across studio buildings. You can send it through twisted pair audio cables, through XLR and in your case through a 3,5mm jack.

US1 has decided to output their TC signal via a miniature connector that is used for high bandwith digital signals such as modern SDI (, not even the early SDI generations I wrote about earlier). Whatever their reason for this decision is, it is expensive to re-crimp this connector by the book, because it is a connector made for tasks that is way more fault intolerant than connecting a TC signal. You need to dig through the catalogs of Amphenol, Molex, Switchcraft, etc. They provide exact information on what version of their connector is specified for what cable. You can hope that your cable is among them or that your cable comes with close enough diameters. Then you need a crimper with or without an interchangable die, that has the appropriate hex dimensions for your version of the connector. The official dies are expencive. If you are very lucky, there is a cheap 12Eur crimper that is accidentally close enough to these hex dimensions. Or, you just try your household pliers to fix this little pipe in place (and ignore the kink protection) for timecode, this may be good enough.
But since you have soldering experience, why don't you fix your cable on the TRS jack with a cheap cable someone else has already put a DIN 1.0/2.3 on?

Thanks! I will try everything. I ordered some original cables, some AliExpress remade cables, some 1 Euro bnc to din cables and some din connectors to try to crimp them on somewhere. :)

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Don't worry about 75 Ohm vs 50 Ohm BNC connectors at frequencies below 500 MHz. The BNC connector's internal conductor is many times shorter than a 1/4 wavelength at anything below 500 MHz. At the fre

In the old days, we've crimped our BNCs to RG59 for various video signals, including timecode, in the local TV station. The crimp tools especially the dies where a few hundred Deutschmark, the connect

Strange. When I search for "din 1.0/2.3" on aliexpress.com i get lots of results for cheap preconfigured cables, a little further down are cheap connectors angled and straight in various quantities. W

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On 5/3/2020 at 9:48 AM, DanieldH said:

In the old days, we've crimped our BNCs to RG59 for various video signals, including timecode, in the local TV station. The crimp tools especially the dies where a few hundred Deutschmark, the connectors where moderate. Then came SDI and we needed new cables with new BNCs with new dies, all fitted to each other and the senitive digital signal. A wile later, the BNCs and the crimp tools made for analog video poped up cheaper on Conrad Electronics and alike.
Timecode is an incredibly forgiving, low bandwidth, digital signal from the middle-ages of the film and TV industry. After all, it tells you max 30 times a second, what time it is and how many times it has told this before within the very second. It fits well through analog video and you can daisy-chain that signal through many machines across studio buildings. You can send it through twisted pair audio cables, through XLR and in your case through a 3,5mm jack.

US1 has decided to output their TC signal via a miniature connector that is used for high bandwith digital signals such as modern SDI (, not even the early SDI generations I wrote about earlier). Whatever their reason for this decision is, it is expensive to re-crimp this connector by the book, because it is a connector made for tasks that is way more fault intolerant than connecting a TC signal. You need to dig through the catalogs of Amphenol, Molex, Switchcraft, etc. They provide exact information on what version of their connector is specified for what cable. You can hope that your cable is among them or that your cable comes with close enough diameters. Then you need a crimper with or without an interchangable die, that has the appropriate hex dimensions for your version of the connector. The official dies are expencive. If you are very lucky, there is a cheap 12Eur crimper that is accidentally close enough to these hex dimensions. Or, you just try your household pliers to fix this little pipe in place (and ignore the kink protection) for timecode, this may be good enough.
But since you have soldering experience, why don't you fix your cable on the TRS jack with a cheap cable someone else has already put a DIN 1.0/2.3 on?


This is probably the best advice you could hope for here. When it comes to DIY knowing the ins and outs of each component is what leads to it being a success or just falling apart after one job or in the middle of a job.  That usually means pouring over all the datasheets and doing the homework. I’d recommend getting away from buying cheap mystery parts and cables from alibaba etc and buy the real stuff that those factories are copying to begin with.
 

I went down the “I think I’ll make my own BNC cables” path last year for the first time after years of soldering and it was a much more involved process than I was anticipating. Sorting out just the right cable brand and type, just the right connector that matches, how to strip the cable EXACTLY correct, should I buy a tool to do that? Is it ok to just use a knife? Cigar cutter?? just the right crimper and die, to solder the pin? Or to crimp the pin? Both??? (Discovered that particular question is the BNC equivalent of do you ground the shell?... everyone has a different opinion) what size boot for the combination of connector and cable.. lots of details to get your head around and you’re not going to find it all in one place on one sheet. 
 

PS, RG174 is typically a small diameter 50 ohm antenna cable. I can understand why that guy was confused. The link you posted is the first time I’ve seen a 75ohm version. 
 

PSS as others have pointed out impedance is meaningless for your purpose here. It’s important in video cables and RF cables and then mostly at long lengths. 
 

Good luck, Sound!

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On 1/15/2018 at 9:00 PM, drpro said:

I have been using TCS products for several years and at the end of last year bought a couple of the USO boxes.  Used them several times and like them.  They integrate very well with their other products.  

So today using one of the USO boxes and discovered the main function switch (read large) is sticking slightly down in the case.  It still worked, so finished the shoot and when I got home took it apart and there in the middle is the broken main switch.  I have reached out to TCS for I hope warranty repair as I have only had them for 32 days.

Up until now, no issues, from the inside peek, the board level switches could be a problem.  Also there is no weather sealing around the switches, so this could be a problem unless you protect them from the elements.

Amen to the velcro not sticking.  I have cleaned the surface with denatured alcohol and gone to industrial strength velcro.  We shall see.

I have not used the other vendor products mentioned in this thread, so no comments as to their performance or suitability.  There are compromises made for each product and only the user can determine if they meet their needs.

YMMV

David

 

USO.jpg

 

@drpro I'm dealing with some sticky buttons myself- do you have any pointers on opening these suckers up?  Mine are out of warranty I believe, but some are acting like they could use a little button cleaning.  Thanks for any wisdom here...

 

Todd

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Todd if my memory serves, the cases pry open.  I had to send my to Trew in Atlanta for repair.  The production company paid, since the camera operator dropped the unit.

David

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@drpro @tincali You don't have to pry open the USOs like the TRXs. It's just the corner T5 torx screws and the nuts around the DIN conenctors. I've had to replace a screen after being dropped and was able to do it quickly.

As for the switches, it may be the the piece that actually pushes the button getting stuck. Could need a new membrane? I haven't opened mine up in a while so I can't give a definitive answer.

It's also a good idea to buy some sort of case for USO. A drop from 3 or 4 feet can crack the screen if you don't have a case. I don't know the options, but my problem with the official TCS silicone cases is that they use a thin metal plate for the velcro. That plate will keep coming out of the case (it's glued and held in by a 3-4mm lip) everytime you remove it off the camera. I've even had the plate break after so many jobs. I ended up removing the plate and just crazy gluing velcro onto the case itself.

Contact support. They have done me well so far and they have even sent me a video on how to open up a trx case.

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  • 3 weeks later...

By the way: my connectors for the cable have arrived from china, but no crimping tool. But I guess you don't have to crimp anything! Soldering seems enough and could be even more robust. Here is a video with some larger connectors.

 

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  • 2 months later...

Now I got all my cables and the crimping tool shipped from china, I just tried to install the SMA Connector on a cable. But I cannot get the copper pin out to crimp it on my cable. Usually the copper pin in the middle of the plug is shipped separately so you can crimp it on and then just click it into the plug. Does anyone know how to get it out? 

https://www.ebay.de/itm/223480639309

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4 hours ago, Sound said:

Now I got all my cables and the crimping tool shipped from china, I just tried to install the SMA Connector on a cable. But I cannot get the copper pin out to crimp it on my cable. Usually the copper pin in the middle of the plug is shipped separately so you can crimp it on and then just click it into the plug. Does anyone know how to get it out? 

https://www.ebay.de/itm/223480639309

 

It isn't an SMA, but a DIN 1.0/2.3 connector. In the connector you linked on ebay, it isn't a crimp for the center pin, but solder as you can see the solder cup in the product images, also why there is a big opening around it.

You need to prep your center conductor to exactly reach with just enough jacket removed to fit into the cup

image.png

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