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Trey LaCroix

6 series trim knob -CL12

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Hey everybody! Love my 688/cl12 but hate having to adjust the tiny trim knob on the mixer instead of the board. I can do it but it’s not easy to ride on a really dynamic scene. Wondering if anyone has come up with a DIY way to put on a bigger knob or if there are other solutions that I haven’t thought of yet?

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Even though I may sound older now than I am, but I want my technology to adjust to me not vice versa. 

Well, obviously that’s not really true, but the point if the CL-12 and all other mixer controllers obviously is to bring us back the analog mixer experience. And that’s what I want. The more of a real mixer I have, the happier I am. That’s why I really like the new Aaton Cantaress controller, even though I just can’t justify its cost at the moment (or that of the prerequisite Cantar X3). The day I accept the trims on the 688 I might as well accept the on-boards fader dials. Why get the fader board at all?

Eventually I‘ll get used to it. 

Or not

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Hopefully Sound Devices doesn’t make the same mistake again. Seems to me the evolution of the 6-series wasn’t exactly planned in advance but rather a sometimes hurried, quick stomp-the-Nomad, what-else-can-we-add to keep them happy and not have to make a new 7-series kind of affair. 

 

That said, I love my 633. Perfect ENG/doc mixer and recorder. Might be the best of the series. 

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16 hours ago, Constantin said:

Even though I may sound older now than I am, but I want my technology to adjust to me not vice versa. 

Well, obviously that’s not really true, but the point if the CL-12 and all other mixer controllers obviously is to bring us back the analog mixer experience. And that’s what I want. The more of a real mixer I have, the happier I am. That’s why I really like the new Aaton Cantaress controller, even though I just can’t justify its cost at the moment (or that of the prerequisite Cantar X3). The day I accept the trims on the 688 I might as well accept the on-boards fader dials. Why get the fader board at all?

Eventually I‘ll get used to it. 

Or not

Not sure how technology adjusts to an individual. Seems like all things are built with fixed limitations, no? 

I know it's an age old tradition to bitch about the gear that manufactures build for the market but can you imagine the cost per unit if we could order custom builds from the vendors? 

CrewC

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1 hour ago, old school said:

Not sure how technology adjusts to an individual. Seems like all things are built with fixed limitations, no? 

I know it's an age old tradition to bitch about the gear that manufactures build for the market but can you imagine the cost per unit if we could order custom builds from the vendors? 

CrewC

I actually tried this a few times, when I was younger and stupider.  Did not end well.

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3 hours ago, old school said:

Not sure how technology adjusts to an individual. Seems like all things are built with fixed limitations, no? 

I know it's an age old tradition to bitch about the gear that manufactures build for the market but can you imagine the cost per unit if we could order custom builds from the vendors? 

CrewC

 

Well, the people who build the technology can adjust it. When I said „adjust it to me“, I didn’t mean that literally. I don’t want gear to adjust to me personally. I just don’t want to change an important part of my workflow, such as easy access to trim pot. 

If they come up with a good idea, that makes sense in terms of workflow, I‘m all for it. As an example I‘ll mention Cantar, where on its surface you can have fader 1 control the mix contribution of input one and with fader 2 you can control the gain of input 1 (you can also choose to not do this). To me that’s a clever way of improving the workflow, while leaving it to me if I actually want it. Sound Decices otoh force me to adopt their workflow, which in the case of the trim pots can only have been a total mental blackout on their part.  At least if I could change the function of those rotary dials... 

 

Very generally speaking I want my control surface to be as close to an analog console as possible. YMMV

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My solution -  Remove the faders. Makes it much easier to grab hold of the trims. Not ideal, but helps a lot

IMG_4732.JPG

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I've talked to dealers and Sound Devices, and the reason is, the trim is an actual trim pot in an analog stage  and the CL-12 is a digital controller. I guess you can go to the 788 ifbyou want, it's the way the 6-series system is designed and priced.

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On 5/17/2018 at 5:13 PM, CQSOUND said:

My solution -  Remove the faders. Makes it much easier to grab hold of the trims. Not ideal, but helps a lot

IMG_4732.JPG

What size are the end caps you are using?

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The caps are actually Vacuum Caps I bought at an auto parts store. I they are trimmed down a bit. Not sure the size, but the caps usually come in a pack with multiple sizes

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On 5/17/2018 at 4:13 PM, CQSOUND said:

My solution -  Remove the faders. Makes it much easier to grab hold of the trims. Not ideal, but helps a lot

IMG_4732.JPG

Stole your idea and took it a step further! Using the trim knobs couldn’t be easier now. Thanks for the inspiration as I never would have thought of this on my own.

 

7E31D187-45E2-4A2B-A922-526B0381941E.jpeg

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For caps like the above, look for "thread protectors" or "screw protectors" at a hardware store.  You'll typically find them in the section where they have parts in individual drawers.  Each color of thread protector corresponds to a given size.  Buy different sizes and you'll find they're handy for a variety of things (e.g. covering the barrel of an unfastened DC connector so it can't accidentally short out if it touches conductive metal or covering the on/off switch of a TS3 slate so an AC doesn't mistakenly turn it off when trying to change the brightness.)

 

 

 

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