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Ty Ford

Sound gets no respect! Hmmmm.

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I've been thinking about this recently and......I think if we continue to hold onto this thought that "sound gets no respect" that it will only continue the problem.
 
I have a soundie friend. We were talking about a local producer. He had NOTHING good to say about him, especially how he acts with him, e.g. - No Respect. I've worked for this producer and have never had a problem. So, the question is, WTF?
 
Is it something I do or don't do? Is it something my soundie friend does or doesn't do? I don't know, but I'd like to open this up and see if we can come up with answers.
 
It's probably two-sided. Something we're doing or saying, they way we react, and also something they are doing and saying to which those of us who perceive this problem respond.
 
Can others chime in here? What are your experiences? What do you do if you find yourself in a bad situation with a producer, lighting person or whatever?
 
I've done local, mostly small budget work, spots, non-broadcast and small budget narratives. No major union work. I am hired by people I know and by people I don't know. I'm not sure that has anything to do with it.
 
Procedurally, I let the producer tell me what he/she is going after and how they would like me to proceed. If I hear something in a take that's a problem, how do I relate it to the producer? Do I say something to them, is it a look or maybe just a head shake from me that says, "no?"
 
If it's questionable, and I'm the only one hearing the sound, I'll ask the producer to listen to the take. This gets me out trouble if someone later has a problem with the sound. If the producer says, "no, that's ok. I don't want to hear the take." I tell them that they really need to because I don't want to run into problems later.
 
Again, most of my work is non-union so after I get set, I'll ask if anyone else needs help. Typically they don't, sometimes they do, but just asking sends a message of willingness and teamwork.
 
Is this a problem for everyone? What do you think we can do to solve this problem?

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Well Ty times have changed and I see less experienced people on the production end of things.

The digital devolution means that every man and his dog can own a camera and point it.

 

Sound needs more consideration and skill to achieve results even for the smallest production

hence us sound guys and gals have to speak up, ask questions and suggest solutions to the

situations we find ourselves in.

 

So be brave, take pride in your results and feel proud of your acheivements.

 

mike

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Ty - it's Christmas! Why the pessimistic subject?? Myself: soundie, engineer, editor, technician .... above all - always for now virtually thirty years - "filmmaker"

 

Happy Christmas to everyone - but to Mike as a fond and proud extra -

 

MERRY CHRISTMAS MR WESTGATE !

 

Bless this forum!

 

Jez x

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Hi Ty and Jez

 

I've been in this business 53 years and enjoy and strive to present my best attitude and results.

 

It's still hard but I love it!

 

Have a great break and fondest for 2019

 

mike

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i used to give my students a mantra on the first day of my postpro class at Berklee:

 

"Everybody say after me, 'Never give the clients what they ask for'."

They'd repeat, and then while they were laughing I'd interrupt:

"That's only the first half. The rest is 'Always give the clients what they want!'"

 

If a client knew how to tune a parametric or cut a song so it sounds like it was written that way, they'd do it themselves. But they do know that something about the timbre isn't working, and the song doesn't land in the right place.

So you have to listen past what they're asking for, and figure out what they're really trying to accomplish. Then do it, and they'll walk away believing you're the only soundie who appreciates their genius.

 

 

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Jay, you didn't have to explain it (to us) - perfect. I second Larry!

 

Mike, I watched Merry Christmas last night, certainly for me one of the very best Christmas films going, and a tough watch. You made a classic and one which made me want to be in this industry when I saw it as a kid.

 

Bless all, Jez

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Wow thanks Jez.

 

Gee 1982, 3 radios and 1 boom.

 

We had no rushes viewings at all in Rarotonga but Oshima San organised

a viewing when we returned to NZ ( a married optical print).

 

He commented to me after the screening "sound very clear, very strong!".

 

Cheers

 

mike

Mike_and_Bowie.jpg

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Christmas present says it all.  Carry with you while you are talking to producer, director, talent, etc.

Cup.jpg

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