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Ruvis

Tips&Tricks to stay comfortable in uncomfortable weather conditions?!

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Good day all of you eerie ears 👂 

Hope everyone had a lovely xmas and let’s hope 2019 rocks!!

I’ll be doing a month’s shoot,that could be anything from warm humid conditions,to wet and windy conditions.Now that I think about it,it sounds pretty much like my digestive system😜

But yes,I’m more asking to find out what do you guys do to stay as comfortable as possible,should you spend the whole day out in the sun,or in the evening with bugs ect.Clothing/shoes that’s quick drying,raincoats,headlamps ect.

I’m struggling to think straight in hot&humid conditions,so for example I’m thinking to maybe modify a camelbak that’ll also suffice as my harness for my mixer.

Just looking for little tips&tricks that’ll make the shoot as “comfortable” as possible.

Thank you in advance.

 

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hot and humid (and buggy): Craghoppers longsleaves and pants...light, wicking, built in bug repellent...Keen hiking boots

extreme cold: lined coveralls...smooth one-piece exterior makes easier harness/bag use...waterproof boots

 

Usually, it all comes down to quality and appropriate footwear (and good socks)...if your feet get wet or cold, it won't really matter how much $$ you've sunk into those DPA mics.

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https://www.osac.gov/Pages/ContentReportPDF.aspx?cid=17704

 

Traveling in hot climates can make you sick, especially if you are not accustomed to the heat. People at highest risk are the elderly, young children, and people with chronic illnesses, but even young and healthy people can get sick from heat if they participate in strenuous physical activities during hot weather.
When you are not in an air-conditioned building, take these steps to prevent heat-related illnesses, injuries, and deaths when traveling in hot climates:

  • ·  Drink plenty of fluids.

  • ·  Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing and sunscreen.

  • ·  Try to schedule outdoor activities during cooler parts of the day.

  • ·  Rest often, and try to stay in the shade when outdoors.

  • ·  If you will be doing strenuous activities in the heat, try to get adjusted before you leave by exercising one hour per day in the heat.
    Overheating can result in heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Symptoms include excessive thirst, profuse sweating, headache, dizziness or confusion, and nausea. If you or anyone you are traveling with develops these symptoms, get out of the sun

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dehydration

A body water loss of 1-2%, considered mild dehydration, is shown to impair cognitive performance.[4]In people over age 50, the body's thirst sensation diminishes and continues diminishing with age.

 

 

 

http://www.system-safety.com/articles/Dehydration.htm

Here are some of the most common symptoms or indicators of dehydration.

1.  Lips and later mouth feel dry

2.  Heart rate and breathing increases—————————I experience these symptoms

3.  Blood pressure begins to drop

4.  Begin to feel fatigued—————————I experience these symptoms

5.  A nagging headache may develop and become progressively worse

6.  Decreased urine output

7.  Begin to feel thirsty

8.  Begin to become mentally irritated and depressed—————————I experience these symptoms

9.  Eyes begin to become sunken

10. Skin begins to become wrinkled

11. May develop a stomach ache—————————I experience these symptoms

12. May begin to experience lower back pain—————————I experience these symptoms

13. Become dizzy,

14. Become mentally confused—————————I experience these symptoms

15. As dehydration becomes severe the person slips into a coma and if the cardiovascular system collapses, the person dies.

 

 

71lUKnJ-+OL._SL1500_-2.jpg

Amazon sun hat

71--D42RwpL._SX679_.jpgGet a headlamp with the red led option for nighttime. 

 

Amazon Energizer headlamp with RED LED feature

 

81lOyEfsPmL._SL1500_.jpgCamelbak Amazon

 

You have to rinse and wash the Camelbak reservoir thoroughly before use to get rid of the plastic taste. 

 

I don't use the bladder reservoirs often, I have three I have never used. The bladders come free with the packs. 

 

I prefer these. 

313C92M0svL.jpgAmazon klean kanteen

 

 

 

 

I got one of these, but there very difficult to find. In black anyway. Hip Pouch Camelbak

81fh2nrASFL._SL1500_.jpg

 

Its great for a little LAV box, spare TX, spare IFB, spare batts, tape scissors, LAV weight. 

 

I just saved a DP some trouble by supplying him 9v that I had ready to hand to him. 

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Tight mesh head  net that goes over a brimmed hat for bugs.  Long sleeves and pants.

(A reminder that DEET insect repellent can melt plastic)

 

Sachtler rain poncho -  a bit unbreathable in humid conditions, or if you have to run in it, but very effective for keeping your rig dry.

 

Be careful with the hydration system- damn things can leak at the worst times all over your gear.  I prefer to keep water separate from my rig as much as possible.

 

Cheers,

Brent Calkin

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Attach water on your body with a method of your choosing. I kinda like bottle clips, they're lightweight, don't get in the way and they're easy to attach to whatever. At least in europe, standard plastic bottles that water/soda is sold don't leak very often. Mineral water is better in the heat than just plain water, since you also lose salt (sodium) when you sweat. Merino wool is really nice for both warm/humid and cold/windy conditions, a lightweight long sleeve shirt is good for a pretty wide range of weathers as a base layer.

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For climates that have dramatic temperature swings (like the PNW where I live), dress for the low temp, not the high, and use multiple layers which can be unzipped or removed as needed. Also, invest in a dry bag. I have 3, some for run bags, and one dedicated to my weather gear 

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Hot and Humid - loose, wicking T shirt (Patagonia Capilene is my jam), loose pants if it’s buggy, swampy, high grass. I only use bug spray when absolutely necessary. Comfortable shoes (you know your feet ) and extra change of socks helps for super swamp days.   And always, always look for shade and stay there if possible. Favorite hat if you can’t be in the shade. 

 

14CE1650-9019-41E0-87BB-3F47FBBC5006.jpeg

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