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Will the EV RE320 work in a untreated bedroom space?

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Hi All!

Recently been in the market for a mic for my small 10x12 bedroom studio (carpet floor, bed, and wooden shelves in the space).

I'll be recording it into a Tascam DR60 dmkii. You could describe my voice as dark/bassy with not a lot of articulation in the mid range: https://soundcloud.com/herpinand-derpin/voice-007/s-JHkrcqYQOxQ 

Recorded on a Rode Smart Lav +

 

I'm trying to find something that makes me sound clearer, yet is warm and comfortable to hear for long periods of time. But I am open to a flat/less colored mic if its generally better for my voice. The format is in video, but I'd like it to have that podcast quality.

 

I've looked into the SM57 and Senn E835 but don't like how close I have to be to them. The At 2035 was another consideration but I worry it'll pick up background noise.

Small Condensor Mics like the Oktava Mk012 with the Cardioid capsule was looked into since films use it for indoor shoots, however I can't find any information if they are appropriate in a untreated environment, and how sensitive they are to picking up noise from the room across from me (thin walls).

 

My current approach is to compare the frequency charts of all the mics I've mentioned so far. This has landed me on the EV RE320  which seems like what I need for spoken word, and future voice overs if I pursue it.

 

Anyone have suggestions on whether this mic is appropriate for my voice and environment? Open to other suggestions as well.

 

Thanks all in advance for your helpful insights. The more I look into the audio the more confusing it gets, but I'm willing to learn.

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The first thing to learn is that acoustics are about the acoustic space, not the microphone. There are mics that perform better in a live acoustic environment but they don't change what's happening to the sound waves in the room, just how well they're picked up. An example is the Schoeps 641, you'll still hear the room, but it'll sound more natural with less off-axis coloration. 

 

If you want the room to sound good, treat the acoustic properties of that room. 

 

Realize that background noise comes from background noise, not the mic. While the mic's pattern can make some difference (not as much difference in an untreated room) how the mic is "worked" plays a huge role. 

 

Among other considerations, your mic choice depends on what it's going to be used for, how it's going to be used, and the voice it's going to be used on. 

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John's right, of course. To add to it, a lot depends on how loud you speak. I had a friend send me a file that he tried to submit to a production house. They told him there was some sort of phasing they didn't like. He didn't know hat that meant. He sent the file. Yes, you could hear the space in a very unflattering way. 

 

Why this time? Because he raised his voice. The more energy you put into a space, the more resonant it becomes. Think of a pool table and one cue ball. The harder you throw it the longer it will bounce around on the table. Same thing with voices and spaces. Speaking more quietly, you don't excite the room into resonance as much.

 

Regards,

 

Ty Ford

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On 3/27/2020 at 2:08 PM, Ty Ford said:

John's right, of course. To add to it, a lot depends on how loud you speak. I had a friend send me a file that he tried to submit to a production house. They told him there was some sort of phasing they didn't like. He didn't know hat that meant. He sent the file. Yes, you could hear the space in a very unflattering way. 

 

Why this time? Because he raised his voice. The more energy you put into a space, the more resonant it becomes. Think of a pool table and one cue ball. The harder you throw it the longer it will bounce around on the table. Same thing with voices and spaces. Speaking more quietly, you don't excite the room into resonance as much.

 

Regards,

 

Ty Ford

Yes experience bares something like this out. But I don't feel the difference is as linear as the speed of the Cue ball analogy would suggest - if it were, wouldn't the ratio of direct sound to reflected remain similar and therefor adjusting the recording level for the louder source be more effective than it is? I am just asking as I'm interested in the maths/physics around this and in no way trying to be contradictory, only more knowledgable. Or to put it another way, if I raise the issue with a colleague, I'd like to explain why just turning the gain down doesn't work. Perhaps, to use the Pool table analogy again, the speed of the cue ball remains the same (like the speed of sound wether it's quiet or loud) but the size of the Cue ball has got bigger and therefor bounces around a lot longer. resulting in not just a louder reflected sounds but reflected sounds arriving at the microphone much later. Regards, d

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Sorry to be the bearer of bad news but a typical bedroom is a horrible place to do a voice-over.  Just sayin'  Horrible!

 

D.

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I wrote this big long post with lots of suggestions, I went way overboard. 

 

I'm gonna wait and see how this plays out before I decide to jump in. 

 

Nobody else thinks the Pre amp on the Tascam is the biggest issue??? After all it is designed for DSLR's. 

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2 hours ago, tourtelot said:

Sorry to be the bearer of bad news but a typical bedroom is a horrible place to do a voice-over.

Usually better than a bathroom though.

Depends how much soft stuff is around to deaden the room and how quiet the household and outside environment is.

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On 3/29/2020 at 1:55 PM, Rick Reineke said:

Usually better than a bathroom though.

Depends how much soft stuff is around to deaden the room and how quiet the household and outside environment is.

They tend top be squarish.

 

D.

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Hi,

 

+1 for above comments

 

PS. If you don't have money to buy better microphone or acoustical treatments, then fill the room with staff, especially blankents etc. This will destroy early reflections, don't wait to be like pro studio. Search on Google (or your preferred search enginee) about pro voice over people how they make her/his own way.

 

🙂

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Yes that mic will work in a bedroom.  It will also work in a kitchen, a living room, a hallway, a bathroom, outside, inside and in a car, even in the dark or sunlight. The only place it may not work is underwater.

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“ It will also work in a kitchen, a living room, a hallway, a bathroom, outside, inside and in a car, even in the dark or sunlight.”

 

I’m disappointed. I was expecting a nice Dr. Seuss rhyme. 
 

David

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On 3/29/2020 at 12:57 PM, Johnny Karlsson said:

Google "room modes + reflections + standing waves + phase + nulls" and read away :)

 

Add "comb filtering" to that list!!

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