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Sennheiser mkh 8060 vs Rode ntg5


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Hi,

I am looking for a replacement for my rode ntg3 as it is too heavy and too long for me. 

I need to use it on a boom or attach it to my audio bag or sometimes even use it on a camera. So it should be very small.

Options to me are the Sennheiser mkh 8060 or the rode ntg5. Maybe the deity s-mic 2s but I think it's not directional enough. Do you think it's worth spending more for the Sennheiser 8060? Is it really better? More directionallity? Did anyone use one of the mics? Any other recommendations? Thanks for your help!

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Sometimes i use 8050 as a boom mic indoors. its quite directional and pulls the voice better then neumann km 150 or gefell m310 but has that sennheiser sound  which you may like or not...

 

as shotgun i use a dpa4017 and i am very pleased by size, weight and sound...

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Are you limiting yourself to those mics due to budget? If you don't set a budget parameter, your recommendations will be allover the place.  Also, tell us what you are mainly using it for.

 

The 8060 is a great mic.   The challenges I've had with it are finding a non-blimp shockmount I'm happy with, that can fit a furry or even just the foam.  Without the filter capsule (which isn't cheap), there isn't much mic for the mount to grab on to (the benefit and the challenge rolled into one). I built my own with different lyre strengths to get it right, but in the end I just bit the bullet and put it in a COSI (which I love... it never leaves the COSI). The smaller profile makes it more convenient to the superior sounding (and more expensive Cmit5u...the next step up in quality (and price) would be the miniCmit, and if I had to do it all over again I may have done the mini instead.  But I feel that I got the best in the price range I gave myself at the time. 

 

I use it outdoors, but often indoors on wide shots. 

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11 minutes ago, thenannymoh said:

Are you limiting yourself to those mics due to budget? If you don't set a budget parameter, your recommendations will be allover the place.  Also, tell us what you are mainly using it for.

 

The 8060 is a great mic.   The challenges I've had with it are finding a non-blimp shockmount I'm happy with, that can fit a furry or even just the foam.  Without the filter capsule (which isn't cheap), there isn't much mic for the mount to grab on to (the benefit and the challenge rolled into one). I built my own with different lyre strengths to get it right, but in the end I just bit the bullet and put it in a COSI (which I love... it never leaves the COSI). The smaller profile makes it more convenient to the superior sounding (and more expensive Cmit5u...the next step up in quality (and price) would be the miniCmit, and if I had to do it all over again I may have done the mini instead.  But I feel that I got the best in the price range I gave myself at the time. 

 

I use it outdoors, but often indoors on wide shots. 

Thanks!

i will look at reviews for the minicmit as well. As a shock mount I use the Rycote Invision INV-7-HG-Mark III Right now. Which holds part of the mic and part of the xlr plug, it isn't ideal but worked fine so far. But with the supersoftie on it gets quite front heavy and the ntg3 starts wobbling around when you walk. But you don't hear it. I hoped a smaller mic will not get that front heavy. I already received advertisements for the cosi as private message. It looks good but again makes the mic quite big for mounting on an audio bag or camera and you are limited to one single mic. Maybe a small blimp from rycote is a more versatile option.

Budget depends rather what you get for your money. If I see a massive improvement when I spend 2000 I would even spend that. But for now I have to find the difference between a ntg5 and an 8060. Off axis coloration seems a bit better on the Sennheiser. Maybe it has a tighter pickup pattern which would be good.

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1 hour ago, ProSound said:

For the price the Sanken CS-M1 at $895 would be a great choice similar in performance to a MKH 50 very small and robust. https://www.sankenmicrophones.com/production/shotgun/cs-m1/

Thanks!!!!

the sanken looks fantastic! Exactly what I need. Now I have to find some reviews an look for a mount and small wind shield. Maybe even just a small supersoftie will  be enough this time, as the tube is only five cm and I need a 

little weight for the mount..

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I found nothing about the weight of a cinella Cosi on any website, but if it's as heavy as a rycote cyclone s (kit with windjammer is 716g) then it seems counterintuitive to me to have a mic that lightweight with such a big blimp. For sure it's much more robust and has better wind protection but a supersoftie for 5cm tubes is only 65g. That's WAY less. And I guess it will work on my rycote mount with the supersoftie, so the mic is not too lightweight for the mount.

 

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7 minutes ago, Sound said:

I found nothing about the weight of a cinella Cosi on any website, but if it's as heavy as a rycote cyclone s (kit with windjammer is 716g) then it seems counterintuitive to me to have a mic that lightweight with such a big blimp. For sure it's much more robust and has better wind protection but a supersoftie for 5cm tubes is only 65g. That's WAY less. And I guess it will work on my rycote mount with the supersoftie, so the mic is not too lightweight for the mount.

 

Cosi is MUCH lighter than a cyclone. And the 8060 is a FANTASTIC microphone. You’ll be very happy with that combo.

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8 minutes ago, Trey LaCroix said:

Cosi is MUCH lighter than a cyclone. And the 8060 is a FANTASTIC microphone. You’ll be very happy with that combo.

But why don't they publish the weight anywhere?

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8 minutes ago, Trey LaCroix said:

It’s so light it doesn’t matter.

So light, I will fly away when I carry it...

Seriously, every manufacturer publishes the weight of these kind of products.

 

 

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My Rode ntg3 with the big supersoftie is 270g right now and very long and front heavy. The Sanken CS-M1 with the small softie for 120g seems like a great improvement. I asked cosi about the weight of their products, if it's less than a supersoftie I will definitely consider it. :)

 

One advantage of a blimp is that you can mount the microphone in the middle instead of at the rear end of the mic. But with a mic that small I don't think that's necessary at all.

 

Why is the Sennheiser better than the Sanken?

 

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My 8060 is my go to shotgun mic.  I like how forgiving it is yet still maintains being directional.  Great shotgun choice for unscripted / doc stuff where you don't know who's talking next because of its off axis forgiveness as you quickly change focus to another speaker.

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2 minutes ago, Trey LaCroix said:

There is no “better.” You should listen to both mics and pick the one you like best. I prefer the sound of the 8060 to any Sanken I’ve used. Some will feel differently.

 

But when trying to pick up one particular speaker while on a noisy street, a Sanken CS3e is mighty handy. And Trey, how many different mics do you own?

 

To the OP, is your goal to just have one mic for everything? Perhaps think about when you do want a lot of directionality and when you don't. Could you consider getting an additional mic for different situations? I reviewed the Rode NTG3 when it first came out and thought it was OK (as in professionally OK), though heavy as you're finding. Replacing that mic with something like an 8060 would be a serious upgrade. But maybe a better move for now would be to keep the NTG3 and get another mic for interiors and interviews. The two classics are a Sennheiser MKH50 and a Schoeps with a MK41 capsule. Or if you're thinking of eventually getting an 8060 anyway, perhaps you'd like the 8040 (which some people seem to like). I'm not really familiar with DPA's mics, though plenty of people like them. Maybe (=maybe=) consider some of the "poor-man Schoeps" options such as the Audix SCX1-HC... I say maybe because when I borrowed an Audix, I thought it sounded pretty good (though not great) on axis with a basically stationary speaker, it wasn't as great and/or forgiving when the speaker was moving around. The Audix didn't have the great and forgiving off-axis response of my Schoeps mics (but hey, it's a whole lot less expensive). 

 

I use my Schoeps mics all the time. Great for sit-down interviews and also for capturing unscripted/improvised/untrained dialog from people who move unpredictably. The Schoeps MK41 capsule handles those moves so I still get consistent sound. That's good if the mic's on a stand and the interviewee is moving, and also to smooth out my good but not world-class boom technique, or if I need to cover two people speaking at the same time. But it's not my only mic. If you only have an 8060, and you don't mainly work in scripted narrative, and your technique is still improving, you might get in situations where you wish you had less directionality.

 

 

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19 minutes ago, Jim Feeley said:

 

But when trying to pick up one particular speaker while on a noisy street, a Sanken CS3e is mighty handy. And Trey, how many different mics do you own?

 

To the OP, is your goal to just have one mic for everything? Perhaps think about when you do want a lot of directionality and when you don't. Could you consider getting an additional mic for different situations? I reviewed the Rode NTG3 when it first came out and thought it was OK (as in professionally OK), though heavy as you're finding. Replacing that mic with something like an 8060 would be a serious upgrade. But maybe a better move for now would be to keep the NTG3 and get another mic for interiors and interviews. The two classics are a Sennheiser MKH50 and a Schoeps with a MK41 capsule. Or if you're thinking of eventually getting an 8060 anyway, perhaps you'd like the 8040 (which some people seem to like). I'm not really familiar with DPA's mics, though plenty of people like them. Maybe (=maybe=) consider some of the "poor-man Schoeps" options such as the Audix SCX1-HC... I say maybe because when I borrowed an Audix, I thought it sounded pretty good (though not great) on axis with a basically stationary speaker, it wasn't as great and/or forgiving when the speaker was moving around. The Audix didn't have the great and forgiving off-axis response of my Schoeps mics (but hey, it's a whole lot less expensive). 

 

I use my Schoeps mics all the time. Great for sit-down interviews and also for capturing unscripted/improvised/untrained dialog from people who move unpredictably. The Schoeps MK41 capsule handles those moves so I still get consistent sound. That's good if the mic's on a stand and the interviewee is moving, and also to smooth out my good but not world-class boom technique, or if I need to cover two people speaking at the same time. But it's not my only mic. If you only have an 8060, and you don't mainly work in scripted narrative, and your technique is still improving, you might get in situations where you wish you had less directionality.

 

 

Wow. That's a long answer! :)

I am mainly using my lav mics - especially indoors. 

but for documentaries I need a very small mic for unexpected situations when somebody is coming around the corner and there is no time to give him a lav mic. 

so I am attaching the mic on the soundbag to have some ambient sound and if I need it I can use it with a very small boom pole (which I am still searching for..) 

but the ntg3 is too big and heavy for that. With the supersoftie mounted on my bag it's wobbling around.

So basically the situations when I need the extra mic are all outdoors. So it should be a very directional and very small mic that replaces the ntg3. I guess the Sanken should be perfect for that.

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24 minutes ago, Jim Feeley said:

And Trey, how many different mics do you own?

 

 

 

 

Microphones are my addiction. I own:

 

x2 Schoeps CMC641

Schoeps CMIT

Schoeps MiniCMIT

Sennheiser 416

x2 Sennheiser 8060

Sennheiser 8070

Sennheiser 70 (That I'm trying to sell if anyone is interested)

 

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6 hours ago, Sound said:

I found nothing about the weight of a cinella Cosi on any website, 

 

I have a Cinela COSI for my Mini CMIT and have used a friends Sanken CSM-1 it is the best thing for eng work period is just as good as a full blimp but the weight of a softee with an outstanding shockmount built in. 

If I didn't already Own to many mics I would but a CSM-1 

My addiction 

(2) MKH 416 

(2) MKH 50 

(1) MKH 40 

(1) Mini CMIT 

I used to also own 

(2) CMIT 

(1) CS3E 

(1) MKH 60 

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