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Logic Pro X and 32 Bit Float Files


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A Sound Design Mix Pre 3II can record 32 bit float files.

I use Logic Pro X for my sound editing and, as I understand things, it converts 32 bit float files to 24 bit while ingesting them.

If that is the case, is there any point in recording the original audio file as 32 bit float?

Thanks in advance for any information.

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Well 24 bit still has 144 dB of dynamic range are you going to need more than that?
Presumably Logic won't convert a 32 bit file in such a way that it's delivered with 24 bit clipping, if the dynamic range is less than 144db, will it?
The advantage of 32 bit is generally for lazy gain staging, and not for a dynamic range greater than 144db isn't it?
Unless of course you're recording rocket launches or heavy artillery, in which case dunnno, never done it...:)

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I think you‘ll have to go via an intermediary program, like Audacity, Audition, or whatever and convert the file to 24-bit after pulling the audio down so that it won’t seem distorted. It’s been some time since I worled with it, but Audition used to have a fairly powerful batch processor where you could assign a bunch of processes (like gaining down the audio a certain amount and then saving the file as something new with a new bitrate), to a folder of files and have them converted that way really quickly. Don’t know if it still does that. 
once converted you can of course load everything into Logic

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I think the OP asked if there is any point of recording at 32 bit, since Logic will automatically convert the files to 24 bit on import, not how to do it or whether you need another software to do the conversion.

 

I personally feel fine recording at 24 bit, but if , let’s say, you have to do a bag drop in a car for example and you know that the dialog will range from whisper to shouting.... then probably (?)

Assuming of course that it will not be converted in such a way that it ends up distorted. This would have to be tested. Especially if the whisperer steps out of the car to watch a rocket launch.

 

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5 hours ago, Johnny Karlsson said:

I think the OP asked if there is any point of recording at 32 bit, since Logic will automatically convert the files to 24 bit on import, not how to do it or whether you need another software to do the conversion.


I may have skipped ahead without explaining why you might need an in-between program, sorry. 
The advantage of 32-bit float over 24-bit is of course the huge dynamic range at the converter stage. That means you could have a file that would look and sound really distorted. In a 32-bit float-capable app you can simply gain this down and you‘d get a perfect representation of your audio and it would sound absolutely fine. If Logic were to convert to 24-bit without gaining down prior to conversion the audio would stay clipped and distorted forever. 
That‘s why I suggested adding something like Audition into the equation to retain the original audio‘s quality. 
And yes, there absolutely is an advantage of recording at 32-bit float as may have become clear by my above explanation 

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4 hours ago, Constantin said:


I may have skipped ahead without explaining why you might need an in-between program, sorry. 
The advantage of 32-bit float over 24-bit is of course the huge dynamic range at the converter stage. That means you could have a file that would look and sound really distorted. In a 32-bit float-capable app you can simply gain this down and you‘d get a perfect representation of your audio and it would sound absolutely fine. If Logic were to convert to 24-bit without gaining down prior to conversion the audio would stay clipped and distorted forever. 
That‘s why I suggested adding something like Audition into the equation to retain the original audio‘s quality. 
And yes, there absolutely is an advantage of recording at 32-bit float as may have become clear by my above explanation 


Ok, yes that makes sense. Thanks Constantin.

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I edit in Logic Pro X and have developed the following workflow if I am recording a highly dynamic or unpredictable source in 32-bit float:

1) Recording the 32bit poly WAV file on my MixPre and import the files on my mac laptop.
2) Split the 32bit poly WAV file in a free software called AudioMove (since Wave Agent will not split 32bit files currently)
3) Import the files into iZotope RX 7 Elements and adjust the clip gain or peak normalize and save as new files.  
4) Import the normalized files into Logic Pro X which automatically converts them to 24bit and edit.  

iZotope RX 7 Elements retails for $129, but they have sales all the time and I think i bought it for $30. If I am recording stereo or mid-side I make it a point to edit the file gain exactly the same way on both mono files.
 

(I should also say that I love 32bit recording for things like thunder and wind gusts. Explosions, like a gunshot for example, are usually repetitive and predictable so a good limiter can make a 24bit recording sound great after a few test shots. But a blustery hurricane with wild wind gusts or really rumbly thunder can cause your limiter to pump and ruin a 24bit recording. It's not like I can politely ask the thunderstorm to turn around and come back for a second take. )

 

 

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