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Blimp for 150-250mm mics (mkh50/mkh416) without dead space?


Aragorn
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Can anyone recommend a good blimp with softie that would be suitable for MKH 50 (153mm) and MKH 416 without dead space on the front with either of the mics? 

 

If I understand correctly, Roycote's Super-Shield Kit, Medium is for 200 to 250mm, so in case of MKH 50 (153mm) there will be nearly 50mm dead space on the front?

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5 hours ago, Karri said:

The empty space is included in the windshield specs, as in it is recommended for your mic that have that in front of it for the windshield to work as specced.

 

I got from a video that they recommend front end of mic not to recede into that rounding cup area.

 

Because I've never held an Roycote windshield in my hands, I don't understand whether that bar that holds two mic suspension clips can be moved towards the front, and if suspension clips in all of their windshields (WS4, Super Windshield and 416) can be moved into different positions on that bar. So I don't understand how close to front end a smaller mic (mkh50) can be moved in their WS4 or 416 kits. 

7 hours ago, ronmac said:

https://mymic.rycote.com/devices/

 

you can search for best fit here

 

I've been there, the MKH 50 page is not working :)) 

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Those are two mics that are very different in size. The general rule for mics and things like windshields and shockmounts is that you need a whole set for each mic you have. If you are getting into this business to save money, you are definitely in the wrong business. 

 

Regarding your questions about blimps: some of the clips can be moved around depending upon the model of the blimp that you have. You need dead space surrounding the mic in order for the blimp to work properly as a windshield. This is pure physics and common sense. You would want there to be a relatively equal amount space within the blimp for each mic, which is why the two mics would generally not work within the same blimp. Not to mention the spacing of the shock mounts and the types of lyres that you would be using. 

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13 hours ago, JonG said:

You need dead space surrounding the mic in order for the blimp to work properly as a windshield. This is pure physics and common sense. You would want there to be a relatively equal amount space within the blimp for each mic, which is why the two mics would generally not work within the same blimp. Not to mention the spacing of the shock mounts and the types of lyres that you would be using. 

I meant dead space in the front. The space that would have been used to get a mic 2 inches closer to sound source. I guess I'll have to call Roycote and ask them. 

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1 hour ago, Aragorn said:

I meant dead space in the front. The space that would have been used to get a mic 2 inches closer to sound source. I guess I'll have to call Roycote and ask them. 

 

In a zep the dead space in front of the mic should be about the same as to the sides with the mic centered in the basket.

 

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One thing for maximizing space inside is modifying the xlr to a right angle as compact as you can get it and factoring that into your measurements. With this i have had great success for mkh50’s and the rycote #10 but obviously would never work for a 416

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48 minutes ago, ncg said:

The "dead space' is there to allow the air time too slow down before hitting the diaphragm after coming through the basket and windjammer, You can easily push a mic up against the end but you will then get more problems with wind noise.

 

Not so, I'm afraid, in terms of the reason although the resultant advice is correct! The distance from the edge of the blimp needs to be as substantial as possible so that the interface, or boundary, where the noise is generated by the wind attenuation (i.e. the surface of the windshield) is as far from the diaphragm as possible (inverse cube law applying, of course). Don't take my word for it, but that of Chris Woolf (formerly designer at Rycote): some of his technical papers are available on-line. That's why cramming any mic (or MS pair) into too small a windshield is not good news. Indeed, acoustically mics benefit from much larger windshields, although this is impractical for boomed mics due to weight and manoeuvrability (though I do have one huge custom-made blimp - 240mm diam and 700mm long - for a stand-mounted MS LDC pair, which demonstrates the advantage of scale!).

 

But, coming back to shotgun mics with diaphragms away from the tip of the mic, you might think then that the mic could happily project well into the front cap, but, as many on this thread have said, this isn't the case: again, useful to defer to Chris Woolf on this - e.g. in this video at c.40secs in, where he specifically refers to the positioning of the front of the shotgun mic 

 

Cheers,

 

Roland

 

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Thanks Roland, I stand corrected (on at least the theory). 

 

Strangely, I thought It was Chris who had originally mentioned the dead space as a buffer zone, but cant seem find anything to reference that. I did in fact find this from Chris

"Please remember that the efficiency of a windshield is not the "still air volume" - it is the distance of the capsule from the perimeter, and closely follows a cube power of that distance. Even slightly smaller windshields are inevitably less good purely because of this - physics decrees it."

 

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