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AA lithiums on planes


Bob Marts
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  • 3 weeks later...

most TSA guys dont know the rules. read up on it on the IDX and Bauer and FAA sites.

Shipping Lithium Batteries:

Briefly: Carry most small lithium batteries into the cabin of aircraft, tape up the contacts, do not ship any in checked baggage. (And there are exceptions!!)

Warning: There is a rental company here in LA that got fined US$ 50,000.00 because one of their employees shipped consumer (AA) lithiums and 9V lithiums (as used in audio equipment) on aircraft in Checked baggage. They had hearings and lawyers got involved. No damage was claimed by anyone but they got fined anyway.

There are companies than can sell + ship 9V and AA that you buy from them via safe UPS. They have the proper licenses and know how to pack the Batteries they claim. http://revoltpromedia.com/ 818 904-0001. They will not ship the NP-1s that you own already.

LSC 1-818-980-9891 will do the same and claims no special permits are necessary.

From: http://safetravel.dot.gov/whats_new_batteries.html

For personal use, there is generally no restriction on the number of spare batteries allowed in carry-on baggage. This is the case for cell phone batteries, "hearing aid" button cells, and AA batteries/AAA batteries available in retail stores, as well as almost all standard laptop computer batteries.

For info on NP-1 on aircraft etc go to

http://www.idxtek.com/lithium-ion-transportation#carryon

Battery Lithium aircraft waiver for NP-1

Safety Declaration on the transporting of IDX Lithium-Ion Batteries on AIRLINERS:

Under the 44th Edition of the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations effective January 1, 2003: Product names: E-80S, E-50, E-50S, NP-L50, NP-L50S, NP-L46 and NP-L40 Lithium-Ion Battery Pack. IDX hereby declares that the battery pack models listed above have aggregate equivalent lithium content well below the 8g requirement: Acceptable without operator approval: The IATA 44th Edition on the TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS REGULATIONS states that lithium-ion batteries offered for transport are not subject to these regulations if the aggregate (total) equivalent lithium content per battery is not more than 8g. The aggregate equivalent lithium content in the IDX battery packs stipulated above is not more than 8g. Therefore, the E-80, E-80S, E-50, E-50S, NP-L50, NP-L7S, NP-L50S, NP-L46, NP-L40 when packed to prevent short circuit are NOT subject to transport control by these regulations. Signed: Barry Rubin General Manager IDX System

and : http://antonbauer.com/Support/TransportationInformation

http://safetravel.dot.gov/index_batteries.html

http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/airtravel/assistant/batteries.shtm

http://safetravel.dot.gov/definitions.html#lithium

This is the complete advice and it is internally contradictory:

safetravel.dot.gov/documents/airline_passengers_and_batteries.pdf

http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/ash/ash_programs/hazmat/passenger_info/

I know nothing. Don’t take anything I say or write as final word, you must inform yourself.

Though the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) enforces these rules in air transportation, the US

DOT Hazardous Materials Regulations (49 CFR, Parts 100-185) are written, issued, and officially

interpreted by the US DOT Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, Office of

Hazardous Materials Safety (http://hazmat.dot.gov). For questions or comments regarding these

hazardous materials regulations, please contact the Hazardous Materials Information Center

at: 1-800-467-4922 or infocntr@dot.gov

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most TSA guys dont know the rules. read up on it on the IDX and Bauer and FAA sites. Shipping Lithium Batteries: Briefly: Carry most small lithium batteries into the cabin of aircraft, tape up the contacts, do not ship any in checked baggage. (And there are exceptions!!) Warning: There is a rental company here in LA that got fined US$ 50,000.00 because one of their employees shipped consumer (AA) lithiums and 9V lithiums (as used in audio equipment) on aircraft in Checked baggage. They had hearings and lawyers got involved. No damage was claimed by anyone but they got fined anyway. There are companies than can sell + ship 9V and AA that you buy from them via safe UPS. They have the proper licenses and know how to pack the Batteries they claim. http://revoltpromedia.com/ 818 904-0001. They will not ship the NP-1s that you own already. LSC 1-818-980-9891 will do the same and claims no special permits are necessary. From: http://safetravel.dot.gov/whats_new_batteries.html For personal use, there is generally no restriction on the number of spare batteries allowed in carry-on baggage. This is the case for cell phone batteries, "hearing aid" button cells, and AA batteries/AAA batteries available in retail stores, as well as almost all standard laptop computer batteries. For info on NP-1 on aircraft etc go to http://www.idxtek.com/lithium-ion-transportation#carryon Battery Lithium aircraft waiver for NP-1 Safety Declaration on the transporting of IDX Lithium-Ion Batteries on AIRLINERS: Under the 44th Edition of the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations effective January 1, 2003: Product names: E-80S, E-50, E-50S, NP-L50, NP-L50S, NP-L46 and NP-L40 Lithium-Ion Battery Pack. IDX hereby declares that the battery pack models listed above have aggregate equivalent lithium content well below the 8g requirement: Acceptable without operator approval: The IATA 44th Edition on the TRANSPORT OF DANGEROUS GOODS REGULATIONS states that lithium-ion batteries offered for transport are not subject to these regulations if the aggregate (total) equivalent lithium content per battery is not more than 8g. The aggregate equivalent lithium content in the IDX battery packs stipulated above is not more than 8g. Therefore, the E-80, E-80S, E-50, E-50S, NP-L50, NP-L7S, NP-L50S, NP-L46, NP-L40 when packed to prevent short circuit are NOT subject to transport control by these regulations. Signed: Barry Rubin General Manager IDX System and : http://antonbauer.com/Support/TransportationInformation http://safetravel.dot.gov/index_batteries.html http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/airtravel/assistant/batteries.shtm http://safetravel.dot.gov/definitions.html#lithium This is the complete advice and it is internally contradictory: safetravel.dot.gov/documents/airline_passengers_and_batteries.pdf http://www.faa.gov/about/office_org/headquarters_offices/ash/ash_programs/hazmat/passenger_info/ I know nothing. Don’t take anything I say or write as final word, you must inform yourself. Though the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) enforces these rules in air transportation, the US DOT Hazardous Materials Regulations (49 CFR, Parts 100-185) are written, issued, and officially interpreted by the US DOT Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, Office of Hazardous Materials Safety (http://hazmat.dot.gov). For questions or comments regarding these hazardous materials regulations, please contact the Hazardous Materials Information Center at: 1-800-467-4922 or infocntr@dot.gov

Wolf- thanks for the great info:

we were told by Fed Ex & UPS that you cant ship any lithium batts P1 etc. however you can ship Ground.

but we really dont want to take a $50,000 chance (btw; it was not us who was fined)

PS- walkies can be shipped with the batteries attached & bubble wrapped. and NPI's as well in there original box with the contacts taped.

its been working so far.

Thanks again Wolf

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