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BAFTA Sound Nominations


Richard Lightstone, CAS
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SOUND

THE ARTIST – Nadine Muse, Gérard Lamps, Michael Krikorian

HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS – PART 2 – James Mather, Stuart Wilson, Stuart Hilliker, Mike Dowson, Adam Scrivener

HUGO – Philip Stockton, Eugene Gearty, Tom Fleischman, John Midgley

TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY – John Casali, Howard Bargroff, Doug Cooper, Stephen Griffiths, Andy Shelley

WAR HORSE – Stuart Wilson, Gary Rydstrom, Andy Nelson, Tom Johnson, Richard Hymns

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There was one scene of foley, which was accentuated as part of the story, and one brief scene of a couple of lines of dialog at the end.

Other than that, it was musical score, which was fantastic, and deserving of a nomination.

A mixing or sound nomination is almost a tongue-in-cheek joke.

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Nominations for Achievements in Sound Mixing for the BAFTA, OSCAR and CAS are made on the overall sound track, that includes dialog, sound effects and music.

It shocks me when Production Sound Mixers have a myopic view of what is "Best Sound"; believing that it is only the dialog recording that rates.

A great soundtrack is the combination of the production dialog (if any), ADR, Sound Effects, Foley and Music Score all blended into an emotional experience that compliments the image.

That's how I judge when filling in my nominating ballot.

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Nominations for Achievements in Sound Mixing for the BAFTA, OSCAR and CAS are made on the overall sound track, that includes dialog, sound effects and music.

I know. But there were lots of films which involved a lot of "mixing" between dialog/FX/music/score. "The Artist" was basically score, and seems an odd choice. I very much enjoyed the film, but I just don't get this. And I bet there are post mixers (particularly those more deserving of the nod) who agree with me completely.

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" Why "The Artist"? "

It sounded great, that sound (and the lack of traditional sound -aka dialog) was a major contributor to the story-telling and viewing experience, and what RL said..

That, to me, is the score in this instance. For which it is rightly nominated.

http://static.bafta.org/files/longlist-1112-1256.pdf

FYI, the BAFTA long list shows that "Tintin", along with the other nominees, not "The Artist", received the asterisk for Sound from the Chapter (A Chapter is a group of over 80 members with specialist skills or experience in a particular craft area). Just saying.

But congrats to all nominees, nevertheless.

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The BAFTA Sound Nominations are selected by the Sound Branch. The final award is also decided by the Sound Branch as well. This differs from the Motion Picture Academy, where the Sound Branch nominates, however the entire (voting) Academy members vote on the final Awards as well.

Thanks for the clarification. Makes it even more odd that the Chapter selection differs from the nomination. Oh, well. Perhaps Kriky will be part of the anticipated sweep, and will have some trophies to show us at the next BBQ.

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Yes. Ok. The soundtrack is good but contrast to the image is an apathetic music.

Does not "comments" the picture in many cases.

In the middle of movie the director is playing with the sound very good and surprise me.

But the end of movie the only dialog is "My pleasure". And not good. Yeap the actor is dyslexic.

Is there a hint for this before in the movie?

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Just caught a screening of War Horse last night -- beautiful-sounding (and looking) picture. Very, very good dialog throughout. At the beginning of the film, I wondered if the levels were too low; by the time we hit the battle scenes, they were just right. Lots of dynamic range, but it works well in a big theater. The grand, sweeping John Williams score was great, too.

All five of these movies were stellar and deserved a nod. I gotta say, though, I'm puzzled as to why they didn't give Bernard Herrmann a credit for that one segment in The Artist. It's such a recognizable theme, and clearly the director was a huge fan. I wonder if there was at least a copyright credit at the end? Had to be.

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