Jump to content

Michael Kocab

Members
  • Posts

    6
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Profile Information

  • Location
    Prague
  • About
    Sound recordist, designer and student in Prague, CZ.
  • Interested in Sound for Picture
    Yes

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Yes, you need the PHA60 accessory. Tady jsou vlastnosti: MTP60 is a pocket transmitter specially designed for professional wireless microphone applications. FEATURES The multi-band MTP60 currently has the widest tuning range of any wireless transmitter on the market (470 to 1075MHz) Monitor & control with Bluetooth via Wisycom Manager software or mobile device apps to adjust parameters in real time Dedicated hardware allows accurate real time position monitoring with advanced user interface. Advanced linear technology (L20mW) eliminates intermodulation distortion for more robust signal Embedded recorder to record directly on the MTP60 memory card and integrated Linear Time Code decoding Enhanced robustness against self-interferences and antenna performances thru a proprietary “intermodulation cancellation” circuit An integrated haptic engine that gives tactile feedback with different vibration patterns FPGA based signal processing allows easy switching between wide and narrow band operation Miniature design with flexible PCB (no connectors) for extended reliability New ENS compander for a totally clear sound Powering with 2 x AA battery (Alkaline, NiMh, Lithium) or MPRLBP lithium battery (5.55 Wh) Bluetooth interface and mobile app allows full control from mobile or tablet Integrated low-pass audio filter eliminates ultrasonic interference from devices such as focus pullers Bluetooth 5 Long Range (Class 1, 100mW) with the MRK16 as a bridge allows remote control the MTP60 over hundreds of meters Front panel buttons to quickly enter menu thanks to its multiple shortcut combinations Max input level 26dBu (15.5 V clipping) to connect directly to mixers and instruments 48V phantom power to use wired mic thru the PHA60 accessory
  2. Exactly what I was looking for, thank you Larry !!
  3. I recently purchased the MCR54 receiver to go with my MixPre10T. When I scan frequencies with the recorder turned off, I get much lower RF noise levels than when I turn the recorder on. My receiver sits on top of the MixPre, I have a junior stingray bag and there isn't much of a way I could physically separate the two. I am an extreme RF noob, but I understand it wouldn't be proper to just "extend" my whips using two short SMA cables (ground plane issues?). Is there anything else I could do? Wrap the recorder in some sort of RF shielding material? Or just go ahead and buy the Betso Bowties? Do higher end mixer-recorders even have to deal with this issue (RF spray), or is it a MixPre thing? Sorry for the million questions and thank you! Michael
  4. Hi! I’m a sound for film student at FAMU in Prague. I’m writing my dissertation on how wireless microphones expanded possibilities for film making and am particularly interested in the period from around 1965 to 1975, when the technology first started being implemented. I have read George Groves’ account of first using wireless microphones in My Fair Lady and Ed Tise’s article about using wireless mics during the production of Full Metal Jacket, but would really appreciate more information about that period in sound recording. Any pointers would be greatly appreciated, and if any of you who have experienced this era would like to speak with me through a quick online call or chat, I would be incredibly grateful !! Cheers to jwsoundgroup, I really appreciate all of the information I have gained from this forum ! Michael
  5. Hi! I’m a sound for film student at FAMU in Prague. I’m writing my dissertation on how wireless microphones expanded possibilities for film making and am particularly interested in the period from around 1965 to 1975, when the technology first started being implemented. I have read George Groves’ account of first using wireless microphones in My Fair Lady and Ed Tise’s article about using wireless mics during the production of Full Metal Jacket, but would really appreciate more information about that period in sound recording. Any pointers would be greatly appreciated, and if any of you who have experienced this era would like to speak with me through a quick online call or chat, I would be incredibly grateful !! Cheers to jwsoundgroup, I really appreciate all of the information I have gained from this forum ! Michael
×
×
  • Create New...