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Jonathan Reyes

Issue W/ Schoeps CMIT 5U

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Ive mainly been a reality mixer for the past year and a half now.  So my CMIT 5U has been in its wooden case that's in a pelican at my apartment since i mainly use my Senn. MKH 416 for run in gun type of shooting.

So I got a call for a short and I wanted to do it because I really rather do narrative work. But work is work.  

First scene of the day was a 2 people talking in a kitchen, so I decided to use my cmit 5u since they where starting with a wide.  My mic was about about 18inch away and it sounded off axes.  I was puzzled because I know for a fact I was right on the talent.  On the second take it happened again.  It sounded real boomy and I started to get a little mad.  So I switched to my 416 and it sounded fine.  

The next day I was doing a bed room scene, the actor gets out of the bed, speaks to himself and walks towards a door.  There was a lot of clutter in the room and there was carpet on the floor so I was thinking I would try my cmit 5u again and that maybe the first scene from yesterday in the kitchen was getting some reverb off of the floor and walls and making it sound off axes.  So I tried it again in the bedroom scene and yet again it sounded real boomy and off axes. So out of fusterations I ditched it and went with my 416 and my km 184 and the rest of the day everything sounded fine.  

My question is; has anyone ever heard of this issue? Im bringing it in to pro sound to have them take a look at it thought I would ask around to see if anyone has any input.  Thanks!!!

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As we all know, interference tube microphones are not the first choice for interiors, especially small and or reflective spaces...they tend to emphasize any reverberations.

How does yours sound outdoors??

and, of course, it certainly could need service...

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I also did a walk and talk outside on the streets of NYC. And it sounded A little bit better but not as good as my 416, plus it was a really noisy intersection. I use to rock my cmit all the time and I definitely have that gut feeling something is wrong. May be I'll post a take with the Schoeps vs the 416. Interior scenes.

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Neil duplicated his post so I'm copying my reply from the first version:

The CMIT 5 U has three settings that have confused many. The three buttons are +5dB at 10 kHz, 300 Hz, 6dB/oct. and 80 Hz, 18 dB/oct. Off is Green and on is Red. There is stenciling showing where the off position is, but many just use the color lights and assume "Green means Go". The most common setting is with only the 80 Hz cut on.

Of course taking the time to listen and experimenting with the various settings is the ideal method, but sometimes you just put the microphone into service and expect it to sound great -- it's a Schoeps right?

The CMIT manual says it this way:

The two low-frequency filters start working from 80 Hz and 300 Hz. However, even when these are both switched off, there is another low filter active below 40 Hz at a slope of 6 dB/oct. The steep low-cut filter below 80 Hz (18 dB/oct.) suppresses wind and boom noise. The filter below 300 Hz (6 dB/oct.) is a gentle roll-off that compensates for proximity effects (elevation of low frequencies by directional microphones in near-field use). They also protect against disturbing, inaudible (infra-)sound that can be caused by ventilation systems, track vehicles and wind. What is tricky about this is that although it is hardly noticeable, infrasound can cause strong audible distortions in the connected equipment when it leads to an overload. This would make it impossible to produce a useable record. A high-frequency emphasis compensates for high-frequency loss caused by windscreens and enhances speech intelligibility. Pairs of LEDs next to each pushbutton indicate the status of the filters. Green means “Filter is OFF”, which means constant frequency response curve. Red means “Warning, filter is ON”. The settings are retained when the microphone is switched off.

My experience is to use the 80 dB cut only. When you have a chance, give it a try and I know you will love the beautiful warm sound only a Schoeps can give as well as the increased pick up from the longer tube.

post-273-0-12802700-1315073945.jpg

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Was it humid at all? On the last feature I was on we mainly used a CMIT5U, but humidity could easily bog the mic down. It would often sound very muddy as you describe. We could usually warm it with a light and it would come back into it's own after a few minutes.

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If you are having issues of humidity with your Schoeps mics....take off the acoustifoam pop filters...I replaced them with something else on the MK41 and have gone without on the CMIT5U....problem gone...

BVS

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Did a night shoot last week at Griffith Park and both of my Schoeps CMIT's failed on the same scene for the first time, Temp changed and it got very damp very quick. In the 4 years plus have had them never had an issue with them the Schopes 41 sure but was surprised by it. Pulled out the 60 for only the second time in the last 4 years with no issues and all was well.

Steve

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So I took my CMIT-5U to Pro-Sound today and A and B my mic and one of their CMIT-5U's and mine was sounding fine today. My conclusion is the humidity that day. Because it was sounding A OKAY. I would like to thank everyone for their input and advise!!!

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Wanted to ask those CMIT owners if the issue described from this thread is still ongoing with the latest (serial #) makes? Are there any differences from early made CMIT vs. present ones?

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I haven't come across this situation with either of my CMITs - 4 years old and 2 years old.

I've been in some pretty wet/humid conditions (not extreme though) and the only problems I had was with my previous 442 mixer ingesting water.

To stop the wind on mic when swinging a long pole I use the Rycote Smoothie instead of the supplied foam that might help release any moisture better, maybe.

http://www.rycote.com/products/smoothie/

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Old thread I know, but I'm updating it: I had my new CMIT just fade away on a humid night, with only a foam cover. It was very still, so no need for a windscreen. I didn't notice a muddier signal, but just a slow fade of the signal to almost nothing. Got out the 50. Let the CMIT dry indoors for a few takes. Soon it was back. I put the CMIT in the full windscreen, and it was fine all night. 

 

 

 

 

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