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Wind protection for lavs


James Arnold
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I've recently been chasing my tail somewhat with wind noise on my lavs (Cos 11). Techniques I've happily used for some years (overcovers and the massive Rycot fluffies) seem suddenly useless. It all feels a bit like I'm 'back at school'!

 

Obviously with differing wardrobe and weather conditions there are no fix-all methods, but I'd appreciate some ideas to try out so I can try and maintain my sanity!

 

James

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sometimes all that is needed is the clothing they are hidden under...

sometimes the hiding needs to be coordinated with the wardrobe, and the wind direction...

I suddenly find myself agreeing with Michael Michaels' almost useful post.

I almost never find myself reaching for any wind protection when hiding... Maybe an UnderCover in certain situations.

Are you dealing with a particularly windy environment?

Cheers,

R

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Thank you lovely people. Yes it was hidden rigs I was asking about. It's been a bit blustery in the UK this year, but hardly typhoon weather. I just seem to have had a year of breezy microphones. Probably not helped by some of the talent I've been working with - Uk recordists will understand the fearful words PHIL SPENCER when it comes to wiring difficulties...

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I have used the KTMM very successfully. Just slip it over the cos11, and tape it inside the clothing.

I have used these in very high wind situations. Always have a couple with me for those times.

I love Phil Spencer.. what is the particular issue miking him up?

If it's hairy chest issues, the KTMM may indeed help.

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I have used the KTMM very successfully. Just slip it over the cos11, and tape it inside the clothing.

I have used these in very high wind situations. Always have a couple with me for those times.

I love Phil Spencer.. what is the particular issue miking him up?

If it's hairy chest issues, the KTMM may indeed help.

I think I'll get some!

I'm not sure if you've ever worked with Phil, but me and fellow recordists refer to him as the 'perfect storm' of troubles. Very hairy chest, very fitted shirts - often of highly starchy or otherwise noisy material - and then the jacket movement on top of it. Oh, and very high collars that he drags his chin across. One day you'll get it nailed perfectly and then it all goes to absolute pot the next with exactly the same rig. Plus you only get a few minutes to wire him, so faffing about is not much of an option!

To his credit he is very aware and generally good humoured of the struggles mixers go through with him, but it doesn't seem to result in him changing his bloody shirts!

I bow to the soundguys out there who have found an easy rig for him. That's pure skill!

The downside is that I've never found a wind proof rig for him that he can wear indoors, so it's either risking what you have in outdoor scenes or re-jigging the mic when it's windy.

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I have only seen Phil on the tele here in New Zealand, and like him as a presenter.

I have had to deal with similar challenging talent and wardrobes..You have my sympathy!

I know what you mean about the "perfect storm".. I think we have all had to deal to a few in our time!

Some are a real challenge, but maybe, just maybe, the KTMM will help. They are like a felted sleeping bag for the cos11. Taped into the wardrobe in the sternum area, it may just work. The material is thick enough to insulate against the chest hair, but obviously can't help fabric rubbing issues.

I will now be watching his programmes in a new light..I will be trying to spot the various rigs trying to see who is doing what to overcome the issues.

Good Luck. You must be doing alright though because I can't say I have ever heard Phil Rustling on air. It is one of my pet peeves too!

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My wife is a photographer, she does lots of newborns.  For her shoots, she has a remarkable collection of textiles, one day she showed up with a large piece of synthetic fur.  It's pretty enough but my instant thought was, wind protection.  I've cut it up into many small pieces and when I'm hurting for wind protection on the lavs, I fold a piece over the capsule and seal it around the capsule with topstick.  It works incredibly well.  

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I just finished a month long narrative shoot at the Jersey shore. We spent plenty of time on the beach or bay with high wind. Most of the time an over cover well placed was enough. Being a narrative, I had a boom op that was usually able to make it work with a CS3E in a zeppelin. I think the lack of rear lobe really helped on the beach a few times. Once we did have to double dead cat the blimp. There's probably a better solution than two dead cats, but it was what we had on hand for locations that were previously fairly calm.

It was a two camera shoot, so there were shots that had a camera on a second floor balcony. So wide the boom was a glorified slate mic, so on those shots I really wanted usable lavs. I do have the bumble bee cover, but it's kind of big to hide in most situations. The over covers were able to play because the clothes were the first line of wind deflection. I would have stressed more if it was boomless reality.

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