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Fisher 7 Goes Outside


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And Now The Rest Of The Story:

Three seasons on Mr. Young and the writers come up with a script that has two days of shooting outside on the old backlot next door to our studio. We had a concert scene with 8 cast members and 300 extras. Sure was nice to have that long reach with the Fisher as our cast were in the middle of the 300 extras. 4 studio camers plus the phoenix crane cam.

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I love seeing this but it makes me a little sad even just reading the title: "Fisher 7 Goes Outside". Not so long ago (well, I guess it really was quite a long time ago), the Fisher used to go with us everywhere --- inside on stage, outside on the back lot, inside a practical set on location and outside for exterior scenes wherever we were shooting. It was an indispensable tool, purpose built to do things you just cannot do any other way. So many things have changed with the way movies are made now, it is unlikely that Fisher Boom use can really have any significant comeback... it's sad.

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"So how did you end up solving that problem with the windscreen in the Fisher mike mount? And, was that windscreen enough for you? "

Laurence: I built my own XLR barrel extension (male to female) but didn't have to use it after all. I was able to mount the MKH 60 low enough in the tilt mount to allow the Rycote Softie to fit all the way on the mic clearing the phasing ports. The additional weight of the softie required a very slight adjustment to the balance of the arm. A light breeze did come up in the afternoon but it wasn't a problem.

Jeff: I did have visions in my head of some of the old pictures that have been posted on here of the Fishers working outside.

Phil

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It was an indispensable tool, purpose built to do things you just cannot do any other way.

What sort of things? I guess most under 35's haven't had much dealings with one of these. I do love the look of them, but struggle to think of a practical use over and above a normal boom for 99.99% of shots. Especially when considering transporting and rigging time etc.

..inside a practical set on location..

even, say, a 3rd floor apartment for a page of dialogue, this would be humphed up the stairs? Nice. :)

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What sort of things? I guess most under 35's haven't had much dealings with one of these. I do love the look of them, but struggle to think of a practical use over and above a normal boom for 99.99% of shots. Especially when considering transporting and rigging time etc.

even, say, a 3rd floor apartment for a page of dialogue, this would be humphed up the stairs? Nice. :)

No, we wouldn't hump it up a flight of stairs to a small room where there is hardly any room for any gear... I was just saying that we did have the Fisher Boom on location and did use it in practical interiors.

"Especially when considering transporting and rigging time etc." you have to remember that lots of things took considerable time and effort to transport and rig when making movies: camera was bigger and heavier, dollies were bigger and heavier, sets had to be larger to accommodate lighting, etc. It really wasn't that big a deal. As for "What sort of things?" can be accomplished, this is difficult to explain but most simply the Fisher provided the means to boom a scene that would not be boomable with a fishpole. There is actually a lot more to it than that but that's the simple answer.

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Laurence made a believer out of me recently. I was 2nd boom for a movie last week and found myself looking for places I could stick the model 2 in an office set. It would have been no problem, and we would have been able to rely less on radios.

At the very least, anywhere that there is a stage, a fisher boom should be found.

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This second photograph shows an accident waiting to happen as the boom op has not extendeded the wheels before getting on. There are two types of Fisher boom that are operated in this way. Those that have tipped over and those that are going to. This is the warning sign that is attached to mine.

Malcolm Davies. A.m.p.s

.Boom Warning.doc.doc

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it is unlikely that Fisher Boom use can really have any significant comeback... it's sad.

You said it. I posted mine for sale at one point and had "0" offers on it. Now, I've just decided to fix it up because I like restoring old things and I'm a bit nostalgic. Sure is sad though. If I had the choice I'd rather use the Fisher instead of wearing out my back and shoulders with a fishpole. Then again, I do have huge shoulders. haha

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This second photograph shows an accident waiting to happen as the boom op has not extendeded the wheels before getting on. There are two types of Fisher boom that are operated in this way. Those that have tipped over and those that are going to. This is the warning sign that is attached to mine.

Malcolm Davies. A.m.p.s

.Boom Warning.doc.doc

Malcolm, in that the boom is still upright, it tells us for sure that the right wheel is indeed "kicked out". Your advice is very well taken and I do not wish to diminish it... and I love your warning message... however I would add that while it's ALWAYS recommended to keep both wheels out, many guys will relax the rule for the left wheel in cases like this, where you're working indoors on flat ground with the platform relatively low. All the weight is on the right wheel and that's largely what keeps it from tipping.

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Indeed Malcolm, Laurence is speaking from a great deal of experience. I am extremely safety conscious when employing

JL Fisher Booms on the set and hound the boom operators to always be mindful when moving, using or storing.

I am a pain the neck for them sometimes, I'm sure, but I will not have one go down on my watch.

I can assure you that there is nothing unsafe happening in that photo, just another day at the "office".

I learned to operate them back in he very early 80's.

Cheers,

Kevin Sorensen

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Yes, the right wheel out always when standing on the platform. If you look carefully at the picture you will see a sand or two on the

base's frame for added safety. Which I would do when using an off set arm, in addition to pulling out the other wheel.

BTW, that is John jr. pushing dad :~)

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Back on season 1, our camera coordinator "Pat", was telling me a story of a show he worked on in LA where the operator decided to ride the model 2 between sets on a new setup. The rig tipped over and the operator ended up with a broken leg. Last week when I was outside there was a bit of a slope in the spot where I had to park, not so much a problem with the platform down but I knew I would would be at maximum platform hight to clear the HMI that was off to my left side. I got 2 pancakes from the grip dept and placed them under the wheel on the low side. With all the counterweights,monitor other gack plus myself the rig weights in close to 800 lbs. (no one touch the brake please !) Gravity can be your friend or worst enemy.

Phil

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WOW...what a great photo! Looks like the extension was just about enough to work a little 10mtr DX between takes:-)

cleve/W5CEM

Cleve, I would hate to think of what would happen to the mother ship when all the stray RF got back there via the mile or two of cables we ran. BTW, I've heard good openings into Califorina on 15 mtr.

Phil

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