Jump to content

Jim Feeley

Members
  • Posts

    2,693
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    24

Everything posted by Jim Feeley

  1. I'd guess SD makes a profit on their plugins. And that's good because it means they'll be able to keep making and selling plugins. But I'd guess Cedar, Dugan, and perhaps other companies are getting a decent licensing fee for each copy of the relevant plug-ins sold. And considering the cost to develop the plugins even with some licensed code, and especially the comparatively small market for their plugins, I'd guess their cost-per-customer is fairly high. I'd further guess this is all obvious. And I'd rather the tools I need cost less. But that's the way it is. And during these pandemic days, I'm cool with SD focusing efforts on producing face shields, which appears to be an ongoing effort. https://www.sounddevices.com/ppe/ A PR article from last year: https://www.sounddevices.com/sound-devices-face-shield-production-tops-30000-per-day/
  2. I could see public-affairs shows and newsmags getting into this. You know how some of them say they don't have time for separate audio but also like to fold in late-breaking developments on their stories (esp. when the development is the peg on which their story hangs)? Maybe stuff like C2C will let them more easily accept and handle stuff like this. Or the last-minute bits for corporate pieces, such as a large company's big conference with "humorous" On-The-Road bits showing the execs driving from HQ to the offsite location... We'll have most of the piece finished, but need to fold in a city-limits gag and the here's-them-arriving stuff that we shoot just a couple hours before showing. I've done that gig a few times (with a producer who actually does come up with funny stuff); would be happy to cut out another 30-60min between wrap and edit. But I'm just jawing. Looks like a pretty neat move.
  3. In case you didn't know it was a Wired article, this line will clue you in: "Here’s how it works: Let’s say you’ve got an 8K RED camera on set."
  4. Bike commuting doesn't work for everyone, but it does for lots of people. This is a pretty cool 10-min video:
  5. It's really worth rethinking that. Maybe think of it this way: Since you'll have actors, you won't be doing everything yourself. Expand that into a circle of other people to work with you on your film. Maybe you work on their films in exchange for their working on your film. Even if you're all beginners, you can break up tasks. One person focuses on sound, one or camera, one on editing, etc. And you all get to write and and/or direct when it's your turn. Maybe be clever and put your film at the end of the line so you all have a bit more experience making films. But so many things need to be done well to just finish a film, let alone make a film that -anyone- would want to watch, that trying to do everything yourself will (1) be painfully frustrating, (2) greatly increase the chances that you won't get the film finished, and (3) super-duper greatly increase the chance that the film won't come anywhere near where you want it to be. More important than knowledge is experience. And judgment. My favorite aphorism: Good judgment comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgment. Form a band of filmmakers and get some experience. Then you can take advantage of David's fantastic advice.
  6. Rado, there's been several studies on this. And many appear to be fairly carefully done and account for your concern (though of course, I'm not a scientist). One line from the abstract: "Therefore, even after taking the increased respiration rate of cyclists into consideration, car drivers seem to be more exposed to airborne pollution than cyclists." That's from this: Differences in cyclists and car drivers exposure to air pollution from traffic in the city of Copenhagen There was another study more recently that gets closer to your concern, but according to this news coverage of the study, "The cyclists were exposed to a total of 12m pollution particles during their journey, almost half the number encountered by those in buses and cars. Cyclists may breathe more rapidly as they exercise, which would bring the particles they inhale up to close to that of motorised transport users. But on routes with slow traffic, where car and bus commuters are forced to sit in clouds of pollution, cyclists fare best." The news story can be read here: Cyclists 'exposed to less air pollution than drivers' on busy routes And even though this is a sound forum, I'll include a visual from that article: And yes, when necessary, I ride with a mask. Not always N95 since I'm leaving those for first responders and others. But if I'm next to a bus or within about 50m of other people, I have a good mask on. It works out fine.
  7. Rado, I don't know how things are going in Nevada (though sounds like they're not going a lot better than here in Calif), but here in Calif, I think the current deal is 65+ qualify for immunization (as do some other specific categories of people), but underlying conditions are not currently factored in... But the specifics of who can get vaccinated and when is made at a county level... (ie some aren't yet immunizing 65 year olds, I think) In California, there's this somewhat useful state-run website: COVID-19 vaccination: Find out if it’s your turn And there's this GREAT!!! volunteer-built and run website that's constantly updated. It's really helpful: VaccinateCA: Find a COVID-19 vaccine for yourself or a loved one Maybe there's something similar in Nevada? Geez; good luck Rado! And good luck everyone!
  8. Larry (well, Gordon and Karl), that link 404s for me. And searching on SMWB on Lectro's site I can find that link, but it also 404s... Local 695 has a good guide to filling out the license application (everyone: please let me know if this page/info isn't up to date): https://www.local695.com/fcc-licensing/how-to-get/ And @Bill Ruck, a NorCal radio engineer, was offering to help people get licenses for a fairly low fee. A bunch of people here worked with him on that and were glad he did. But that was several years ago.
  9. More seriously, though, I think I understand Rado's hesitancy. Especially in the Las Vegas area (where I've ridden and long long ago raced). Not consistent bike-friendly roads or infrastructure there (there are some great roads to ride for fun; fewer to safely commute in my not-fully-informed opinion), and there was a horrific collision outside of LV a couple months ago (a friend worked for one of the people killed): Driver Who Killed 5 Cyclists Had Methamphetamine in His System, Prosecutors Say
  10. AirPods Max Leather Cases "The Airpods Max Leather Case by Pad & Quill offers luxury protection, great utility, and even includes a built-in stand for the headphones. The case has a 25 Year Leather Warranty and 30 Day Money Back Promise." https://www.padandquill.com/airpods-max-case.html
  11. I agree with Rado: Cars are dangerous and unhealthy. We need to get them off roadways, which became paved largely through the efforts of the League of American Wheelman. Maybe we could start implementing special car lanes and car paths. But until then, for the safety and health of everyone, cars need to be banned. Or we could pay attention to research like this: Why cities with high bicycling rates are safer for all road users I ride bikes less than I used to, but still ride 6000miles (~9500km) a year. With reasonable defensive cycling, I'm fairly safe. In my experience, its drivers of motorized vehicles looking at their smartphones, rolling through stop signs, crossing over double-yellow lines, and otherwise making dangerous maneuvers that creates the danger. This is a well-researched (but still fun to read) book: https://utpress.utexas.edu/books/guroff-mechanical-horse
  12. Congratulations everyone! From Deadline: Academy Awards Revealed For 17 Scientific And Technical Achievements; Virtual Ceremony Set For February
  13. There are some answers to that question in this discussion:
  14. Look into L-Mount batts on a sled, or one of the external battery systems. There's some good information in this SD tech note: https://www.sounddevices.com/mixpre-3-mixpre-6-powering-options/ And more info here if you search around...
  15. Such a cool band. Wayne rolled over me in his bubble once...
  16. I can't recall if you need recording in your device, but if you don't maybe look for a used Sound Devices 302 mixer. https://www.sounddevices.com/product/302/ Or if you want something a bit bigger and even more flexible, perhaps a used Sound Devices 442 mixer. https://cdn.sounddevices.com/download/lit/442-factsheet.pdf The recommendations for a Zoom F4 aren't so bad. Preamps aren't as nice as those in the 302 and 442, but they're OK and the F4 can record. I'm probably repeating what others have said. Looks like there are several good options for you.
  17. I like Johnny's reasoning for possibly avoiding 410 systems. And Lectrosonics, like most companies in our small space, tend to be really good at making their product information available, even for products they no longer sell. Here are some pages to start exploring: Quick Start Guides (back to 400 series, at least; not sure if 200-series stuff is on this page): https://www.lectrosonics.com/support/manuals-data-sheets/quick-start-guide.html?start=0 Legacy products manuals (since the systems we're talking about are no longer made...IIRC): https://www.lectrosonics.com/support/manuals-data-sheets/legacy-products.html Or just search for the model numbers (e.g., LMa, 411). Yes, you'll have to know the model numbers but those are all easy to discover. But as a few of us have said, finding frequency ranges that work for the locations where you want to use the wireless is SUPER DUPER important these days. Search here and you should be able to find recent local first-hand knowledge. Or ask. But let's roll back a bit. So you have or are considering the Sennheiser AVX? What are you looking for beyond what those offer? Better sound quality? More resistance to interference? More range? A "normal" works-in-a-bag receiver?
  18. Perhaps 411 receivers paired with LMa or LMb transmitters. All used, and all in appropriate blocks for your location. What do others here think about even older 211 receivers and 200c transmitters for Aragon? Mine still work (not that I break them out very often), but then I bought them a long time ago. Rather ancient tech; worth buying today if you're on a budget?
  19. Great lineup! The Fenders must have been fun. Unless Leo was playing lead guitar... Also: "and many others" could have been my band's name. 😉 So great that you kept and found that card.
  20. Damn autocorrect. Where David wrote "goofy" he clearly meant "elegant" 🙂
  21. Don't forget the TA3M tape out. Working from memory, but 15+ years ago, I would sometimes send the tape out to a little Marantz PDM620 set to MP3 for transcription or 24/48 WAV for backup (the master outs were either cabled to the camera or Lectro TX for a hop). Sounded pretty good and I'm =pretty sure= that I was bypassing the 620's preamps. However, I was using Sennheiser 416, Schoeps 541, and Sanken CS3e mics and Lectro wireless. Rick, is there no way to bypass the preamps on the Zoom H recorders? But that's all mists-of-time trivia and today if I were looking to record the sorts of stuff as Samuel is, I'd buy a MixPre II 3 or 6 or Zoom F4 (or bigger as Dave/IronFilm suggests) before buying a used 302. And Samuel, that 416P12 must be pretty old. As much as I like to save money, I'd probably not buy it (that said, my 416T still works, though I need to send it to Pete Verrando in Texas USA to get it modified to 48V phantom http://www.416tupgrade.com/416Tupgrade.com.html).
  22. So if you just get a mixer, such as a 302 (I still use mine), how will you record your sounds? Into your H4N? That can work, but if you go for a Zoom F4 or MixPre 3 or 6 (you could look for used ones of those), you'll have a recorder built in. That's handy. Are you planning on mainly recording voice for podcasts or other stuff? Do you want to be able to use the mixer/recorder in a bag over your shoulder, or have a transportable setup that you'd carry in a case and set up on location, or will it always or almost always be in your studio? And what mics are you planning on using? Mainly your Rode Procaster or others?
  23. Related, I think I see some wheels/casters under this, so it counts as a cart, right? #itsjustsocool
  24. Wow. I just googled up this article from July, 2020: Sennheiser Announces Layoffs Amidst Slowing Market With consumer and live sound sales heavily impacted by COVID-19, Sennheiser will cut 650 jobs worldwide by the end of 2022. Wedemark, Germany (July 14, 2020)—Having closed its fiscal year in June, the family-owned Sennheiser Group has announced its financial results for 2019, and while sales were only slightly down overall for the year, the company is preparing for the worst. Citing the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on its consumer and professional businesses, as well as a slowdown in the headphone market, Sennheiser will cut roughly 650 employees by the end of 2022, with about 300 of those jobs in Germany. Daniel Sennheiser, co-CEO of Sennheiser, noted in a statement, “In order to position the company for a successful future, we will adapt our organizational structure to the changing conditions and align it with the new requirements.” As a result, the company will be looking to make cuts in corporate functions such as Supply Chain and Operations. Aiming to enact the reduction in what it termed a “socially responsible manner,” Sennheiser will consider measures such as not filling open positions, a voluntary redundancy scheme and severance options in addition to offering partial and early retirement. Rest of the article: https://www.prosoundnetwork.com/business/sennheiser-announces-layoffs-amidst-slowing-market
  25. They used 1950s wireless technology, as shown in the picture: Wife-Eye.
×
×
  • Create New...