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Lemo 3 pin connector for Zaxcom TX - Again


RadoStefanov
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Original? There are two Lemo models that fit Zax transmitters:

The screw-down type - FVB.00.303.(this bit can be NLA or CLADXX(z) )

The push pull type - FGB.00.303.CLADXX

In both cases, the XX after CLAD is the cable diameter.

The FVB claims that you need a special tool to screw down the cable clamp, but you can easily use needle nose pliers or jewellers screwdrivers.

There is an additional 'boot' part for either connector, which acts as a bend/strain relief:

GMF.00.018.DI

This document may be useful:

http://www.digikey.com/Web%20Export/Supplier%20Content/lemo-1124/pdf/lemo-avfb-microphone-connectors.pdf?redirected=1

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Copied from the Zaxcom manual for TRX:

NOTE: The following 3-pin micro-LEMO connectors mate with the microphone connector:

FGB.00.303.CLAD.22 – has a latch with a pull release. (HIGHLY recommended for RFI prevention)

FVB.00.303.NLA – has a latch with a twist release.

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I've wired up both style connectors and both work fine. The push-pull version is harder to find and is taller, so, in use, the screw-on type is a little less vulnerable to damage. You should be able to source them from your friendly, professional audio dealer.

The main tools I used to assemble both types were patience and care.

NOTE: I used a third-party four-pin push-pull version for a time code cable and it didn't assemble as smoothly as the real thing. It took some meticulous pin readjustment to get it to plug in to the Epic. It works okay now.

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I've wired up both style connectors and both work fine.

John, have you done this for lav wire? I tried to do a couple COS-11D's recently and gave up, after only succeeding in shortening the cable by about an inch. That freakin' polymer inside the cable drove me mental. It doesn't burn up terribly well, so I resorted to an Xacto knife to cut it away....is that the approach you take? Anyway, they're done now. :)

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Yes, I've done COS-11D as well as others. I don't remember the exact sequence, but I didn't have much issue. Keep in mind I've been soldering all kinds of things for a long, long time. Something this critical is where the years really pay off.

When I mentioned my main tools were patience and care I wasn't being at all flip. I hear the frustration from both of you and that's understandable (I've been down that road many times), but that's what I simply did not allow myself to feel when working with the tiny Lemos. I waited until I had plenty of time and then methodically took all the time I needed, reminding myself at every turn to take it slow and easy. I refused to let myself hurry or get frustrated (which would have been easy to do). Otherwise, I don't think they would have turned out well.

I don't recall exactly how I prepped the wires, I just used whatever worked. My usual approach with cables of this type is to carefully separate the wires and serving, then trim off the serving with little side-cutter nibblers, and sometimes burn away bits of silky-type serving, then I usually do a quick and careful burn to the tip of each conductor, or maybe scrape each really carefully with an Xacto knife -- often some of both.

Ironically (oh, a pun), I own a couple of portable soldering irons with micro tips, but didn't have them at hand so I did the soldering with a standard Weller SP-23, 25w iron with a standard tip. Timing and positioning is critical when doing it that way, otherwise you'll have a blob and a mess and a destroyed connector. A smaller iron with a micro tip would make it easier.

Oh, and I tin the end of each wire and also tin each terminal prior to actually soldering the connection -- that makes a huge difference.

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I've wired up both style connectors and both work fine. The push-pull version is harder to find and is taller, so, in use, the screw-on type is a little less vulnerable to damage.

John, did you notice any difference in performance between the 2 connectors? The manual has a note that the push pull connector, which is the larger one (FGB.00.303.) is "HIGHLY recommended for RFI prevention". The note below it states that they recommend that because making the ground connection to the shell is easier. Did you find it difficult to make the ground connection to the shell on the twist lock connectors (FVB.00.303.)?

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Did you find it difficult to make the ground connection to the shell on the twist lock connectors (FVB.00.303.)?

This is the part in attaching the connector that's actually pretty easy. Once you've got the shield/ground apart from the wires and serving, you can bend it back over the jacket, slide on the crimp sleeve and crimp it down. Easy.

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John, did you notice any difference in performance between the 2 connectors? The manual has a note that the push pull connector, which is the larger one (FGB.00.303.) is "HIGHLY recommended for RFI prevention". The note below it states that they recommend that because making the ground connection to the shell is easier. Did you find it difficult to make the ground connection to the shell on the twist lock connectors (FVB.00.303.)?

What Justin said.

No, I didn't find it terribly difficult. I wouldn't recommend this as someone's first cable-making foray, but for someone with experience and patience, it's okay.

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Thanks Justin & John.

I've made several tc cables for the epic and have a fair bit of experience soldering small stuff, so I'm not too worried. I have never seen the fvb.00 connectors, so I thought it would be helpfull to know what to expect. I have my first two zaxcom radios on thier way (trx900la & qrx100), so I'll be wiring my spare cos-11s in the next couple weeks.

Wandering Ear

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The FVB needs a crimper, not sure if the FGB does as well, I've never done one. Lemo say you need a special tool to screw the strain relief in on the FVB, but you can just use 'nippers' (right angle precision cutters), precision tweezers or even a set of jewellers screwdrivers. Available at all good electronic stores for a couple 'bucks.

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The FVB needs a crimper, not sure if the FGB does as well, I've never done one. Lemo say you need a special tool to screw the strain relief in on the FVB, but you can just use 'nippers' (right angle precision cutters), precision tweezers or even a set of jewellers screwdrivers. Available at all good electronic stores for a couple 'bucks.

Thanks for the photos. Is it a special crimper, or will a generic one of the correct size suffice?

The FGB series is a chuck style strain relief, so no crimping needed.

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